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hammock hanging question

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  • slowhike
    i just bought 10 yards of 1 webbing from wall mart. it`s grey & looks (& cost ) same as risk shows on his test hammock. anyway, i`ve been using 1 webbing i
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 30, 2005
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      i just bought 10 yards of 1" webbing from wall mart. it`s grey &
      looks (& cost ) same as risk shows on his test hammock. anyway, i`ve
      been using 1" webbing i got from the local outfitters (seems to be a
      little lighter weight). it goes from hammock to & around tree. a
      couple times i used trees that were a little farther apart than normal
      & had quite a bit of stretching going on. the new (slightly heaver)
      webbing may not stretch as much if i find myself needing to use two
      trees a little father apart, but i`m wondering if i could tye w/ more
      distance if need be, w/ rope going from hammock to tree hugger & have
      less stretch than webbing? and if so what size/type rope would yall
      suggest? thanks...slowhike
    • dlfrost_1
      ... i`ve ... a ... normal ... more ... have ... yall ... The poly webbing you got at WalMart should stretch out to it s final length after the first few
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "slowhike" <slowhike@y...>
        wrote:
        > i just bought 10 yards of 1" webbing from wall mart. it`s grey &
        > looks (& cost ) same as risk shows on his test hammock. anyway,
        i`ve
        > been using 1" webbing i got from the local outfitters (seems to be
        a
        > little lighter weight). it goes from hammock to & around tree. a
        > couple times i used trees that were a little farther apart than
        normal
        > & had quite a bit of stretching going on. the new (slightly heaver)
        > webbing may not stretch as much if i find myself needing to use two
        > trees a little father apart, but i`m wondering if i could tye w/
        more
        > distance if need be, w/ rope going from hammock to tree hugger &
        have
        > less stretch than webbing? and if so what size/type rope would
        yall
        > suggest? thanks...slowhike

        The poly webbing you got at WalMart should stretch out to it's final
        length after the first few hangings and stay that way. Nylon webbing
        will stretch gradually throughout the night and then recover after
        you exit the hammock ("memory stretch"). Which is why we avoid
        nylon. (It's also heavier.)

        Lots of folks are using the Spectra line along with straps just long
        enough to get around the most common trees in their areas. It sets
        up pretty much like the Hennessey. Garlington's Silk Hammock page
        shows one example.
        http://www.garlington.biz/Ray/SilkHammock/

        Keep in mind that the farther away the trees are from the hammock the
        higher up on the trunk you'll be tying the straps in order to
        maintain the same hanging angle. So how high you can practically
        reach imposes a limit there.

        Doug Frost
      • tim garner
        doug... good info & i hadn`t seen ray`s photos. yep i was begining to think that i would have less stretching w/ webbing just serving as tree huggers & rope
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
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          doug... good info & i hadn`t seen ray`s photos. yep i was begining to think that i would have less stretching w/ webbing just serving as tree huggers & rope to hammock. and i`m glad to hear that the poly webbing will stretch less. what size spectra rope do most people use? thanks...slowhike

          dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@...> wrote:--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "slowhike" <slowhike@y...>
          wrote:
          > i just bought 10 yards of 1" webbing from wall mart. it`s grey &
          > looks (& cost ) same as risk shows on his test hammock. anyway,
          i`ve
          > been using 1" webbing i got from the local outfitters (seems to be
          a
          > little lighter weight). it goes from hammock to & around tree. a
          > couple times i used trees that were a little farther apart than
          normal
          > & had quite a bit of stretching going on. the new (slightly heaver)
          > webbing may not stretch as much if i find myself needing to use two
          > trees a little father apart, but i`m wondering if i could tye w/
          more
          > distance if need be, w/ rope going from hammock to tree hugger &
          have
          > less stretch than webbing? and if so what size/type rope would
          yall
          > suggest? thanks...slowhike

          The poly webbing you got at WalMart should stretch out to it's final
          length after the first few hangings and stay that way. Nylon webbing
          will stretch gradually throughout the night and then recover after
          you exit the hammock ("memory stretch"). Which is why we avoid
          nylon. (It's also heavier.)

          Lots of folks are using the Spectra line along with straps just long
          enough to get around the most common trees in their areas. It sets
          up pretty much like the Hennessey. Garlington's Silk Hammock page
          shows one example.
          http://www.garlington.biz/Ray/SilkHammock/

          Keep in mind that the farther away the trees are from the hammock the
          higher up on the trunk you'll be tying the straps in order to
          maintain the same hanging angle. So how high you can practically
          reach imposes a limit there.

          Doug Frost






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        • Ray Garlington
          ... You d like to use something that has a tensile strength greater than about 1000 pounds. with spectra line, or equivalent, that is something greater than
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@y...>
            wrote:
            > what size spectra rope do most people use?

            You'd like to use something that has a tensile strength greater than
            about 1000 pounds. with spectra line, or equivalent, that is
            something greater than 2mm. 3mm cord gets you about 1600 pounds of
            tensile strength, which is about the size used on most of the
            Hennessey hammocks.
          • slowhike
            ... hammocks. thanks ray ...slowhike
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
              <rgarling@y...> wrote:
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > what size spectra rope do most people use?
              >
              > You'd like to use something that has a tensile strength greater than
              > about 1000 pounds. with spectra line, or equivalent, that is
              > something greater than 2mm. 3mm cord gets you about 1600 pounds of
              > tensile strength, which is about the size used on most of the
              > Hennessey
              hammocks.
              thanks ray ...slowhike
            • dlfrost_1
              ... than ... Been meaning to ask you a question about your silk hammock... Is silk any more prone to absorbing moisture than nylon or poly? Now that you ve
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 31, 2005
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
                <rgarling@y...> wrote:
                > You'd like to use something that has a tensile strength greater
                than
                > about 1000 pounds. with spectra line, or equivalent, that is
                > something greater than 2mm. 3mm cord gets you about 1600 pounds of
                > tensile strength, which is about the size used on most of the
                > Hennessey hammocks.

                Been meaning to ask you a question about your silk hammock... Is
                silk any more prone to absorbing moisture than nylon or poly? Now
                that you've been using it a while, how's it holding up to wear and
                tear?

                Doug Frost
              • Ray Garlington
                ... Yes, it seems to absorb some moisture; however, it dries very quickly and feels very nice against the skin. I notice this when packing early on a cool
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...>
                  wrote:
                  >... Is
                  > silk any more prone to absorbing moisture than nylon or poly?

                  Yes, it seems to absorb some moisture; however, it dries very
                  quickly and feels very nice against the skin. I notice this when
                  packing early on a cool morning and there is some condensation
                  inside the GI shell (I'm still using sil nylon for that).

                  >Now
                  > that you've been using it a while, how's it holding up to wear and
                  > tear?

                  The nylon is very light and strong. The only problem I've had is
                  that some substance dripped on the silk (bird droppings?) and looks
                  like it burned a couple of holes through the fabric. The fabric
                  darkened and the center portion disintegrated in a couple of spots.
                  I suppose it could also have been an actual burn, not sure...
                  Despite the holes the fabric has not torn. Since silk sews very
                  easily, it seems like this could be effectively patched.
                • Bill Fornshell
                  Hi Ray, To the question of a Silk Hammock. The silk hammock Ed Speer made for me (I think it must now be about 2 years ago) is still doing fine. Sorry to
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                    Hi Ray,

                    To the question of a Silk Hammock. The silk hammock
                    Ed Speer made for me (I think it must now be about 2
                    years ago) is still doing fine. Sorry to hear about
                    the mysterious hole in yours. I plan to make another
                    one out of lighter silk. My weight is down to under
                    150 pound so I will try some 4.5mm/0.57oz per sq yard
                    silk.

                    I made my first alcohol soda can stove a few days
                    ago. I went with your YACC stove. It was very easy
                    to make and burned OK. Since then however I have
                    changed to a different design idea and yesterday stove
                    #4 boiled 16oz of water to a rolling boil in less than
                    3 minutes. The stove weighed 0.25oz but used a wire
                    stove stand. The wire stand weighs 0.50oz. This boil
                    test was a more or less controlled boil on the floor
                    of my kitchen.

                    I am going back to the small wood stove I made a few
                    years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic design
                    idea. That stove was less than 8oz and really burned
                    great. The weight does not count the battery used for
                    the small fan.

                    Bill in Texas

                    --- Ray Garlington <rgarling@...> wrote:

                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1"
                    > <dlfrost@a...>
                    > wrote:
                    > >... Is
                    > > silk any more prone to absorbing moisture than
                    > nylon or poly?
                    >
                    > Yes, it seems to absorb some moisture; however, it
                    > dries very
                    > quickly and feels very nice against the skin. I
                    > notice this when
                    > packing early on a cool morning and there is some
                    > condensation
                    > inside the GI shell (I'm still using sil nylon for
                    > that).
                    >
                    > >Now
                    > > that you've been using it a while, how's it
                    > holding up to wear and
                    > > tear?
                    >
                    > The nylon is very light and strong. The only problem
                    > I've had is
                    > that some substance dripped on the silk (bird
                    > droppings?) and looks
                    > like it burned a couple of holes through the fabric.
                    > The fabric
                    > darkened and the center portion disintegrated in a
                    > couple of spots.
                    > I suppose it could also have been an actual burn,
                    > not sure...
                    > Despite the holes the fabric has not torn. Since
                    > silk sews very
                    > easily, it seems like this could be effectively
                    > patched.
                    >
                    >
                    >

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                  • Ray Garlington
                    ... Wow! that is really light stuff. It will be interesting to see how it holds up. ... how much fuel does it burn to do this? Any pictures of the stove? ...
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
                      <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
                      > I will try some 4.5mm/0.57oz per sq yard silk.

                      Wow! that is really light stuff. It will be interesting to see how
                      it holds up.
                      >
                      > ... stove #4 boiled 16oz of water to a rolling boil in less than
                      > 3 minutes. The stove weighed 0.25oz but used a wire
                      > stove stand. The wire stand weighs 0.50oz. This boil
                      > test was a more or less controlled boil on the floor
                      > of my kitchen.

                      how much fuel does it burn to do this? Any pictures of the stove?

                      >
                      > I am going back to the small wood stove I made a few
                      > years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic design
                      > idea.
                      be sure to take a look at Rick's web page about his wood stoves. He
                      had some really good ideas. I shouldn't admit this, but I have
                      purchased a JetBoil.
                    • dlfrost_1
                      ... He ... I ve caught the woodstove bug as well. It turns out that there s a small army of people out in the world working on how to make cheap, efficient
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
                        <rgarling@y...> wrote:
                        > > I am going back to the small wood stove I made a few
                        > > years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic design
                        > > idea.
                        > be sure to take a look at Rick's web page about his wood stoves.
                        He
                        > had some really good ideas. I shouldn't admit this, but I have
                        > purchased a JetBoil.

                        I've caught the woodstove bug as well. It turns out that there's a
                        small army of people out in the world working on how to make cheap,
                        efficient wood/biomass-fueled stoves, mostly for the third-world
                        poor. Huge amounts of info on the net too--lots of calculations
                        already worked out, plans, etcetera. The trick for backpackers is
                        getting the weight down while retaining the efficiency. (If I come
                        up with anything I'll put it online.) Anyone have any
                        recommendations as to which stove list/forum is the best?

                        Doug Frost
                      • Bill Fornshell
                        My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new design with some different materials and the new stove should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 1, 2005
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                          My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new
                          design with some different materials and the new stove
                          should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight does not
                          count the battery for the small fan I use. I also use
                          the battery for my LED.

                          My wood stove's like my new alcohol stoves are
                          designed to use modern combustion theory and
                          techniques.

                          Bill in Texas

                          --- dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@...> wrote:

                          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray
                          > Garlington"
                          > <rgarling@y...> wrote:
                          > > > I am going back to the small wood stove I made a
                          > few
                          > > > years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic
                          > design
                          > > > idea.
                          > > be sure to take a look at Rick's web page about
                          > his wood stoves.
                          > He
                          > > had some really good ideas. I shouldn't admit
                          > this, but I have
                          > > purchased a JetBoil.
                          >
                          > I've caught the woodstove bug as well. It turns out
                          > that there's a
                          > small army of people out in the world working on how
                          > to make cheap,
                          > efficient wood/biomass-fueled stoves, mostly for the
                          > third-world
                          > poor. Huge amounts of info on the net too--lots of
                          > calculations
                          > already worked out, plans, etcetera. The trick for
                          > backpackers is
                          > getting the weight down while retaining the
                          > efficiency. (If I come
                          > up with anything I'll put it online.) Anyone have
                          > any
                          > recommendations as to which stove list/forum is the
                          > best?
                          >
                          > Doug Frost
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >

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                        • zippydooda
                          Would it be practical to use the inflater for your DAM as a bellows for the stove, and save the weight of the battery? Bill in Houston
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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                            Would it be practical to use the inflater for your DAM as a bellows
                            for the stove, and save the weight of the battery?

                            Bill in Houston


                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
                            <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
                            > My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new
                            > design with some different materials and the new stove
                            > should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight does not
                            > count the battery for the small fan I use. I also use
                            > the battery for my LED.
                            >
                            > My wood stove's like my new alcohol stoves are
                            > designed to use modern combustion theory and
                            > techniques.
                            >
                            > Bill in Texas
                            >
                            > --- dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@a...> wrote:
                            >
                            > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray
                            > > Garlington"
                            > > <rgarling@y...> wrote:
                            > >
                          • quiltpatti
                            Hi wood burners, My dual fuel stove is pretty light and gets the job done. It s similar to Rick s coffee can wood stove but uses a 10 oz chix can with 9 air
                            Message 13 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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                              Hi wood burners,
                              My dual fuel stove is pretty light and gets the job done. It's
                              similar to Rick's coffee can wood stove but uses a 10 oz chix can
                              with 9 air holes around the bottom. It contains the wood fire under
                              and holds my water pot. I use my platypus drinking tube for a
                              bellows. The can and coat hanger wires weigh 1.8 oz. A small pleated
                              piece of heavy foil(1gm) holds an esbit tab closer to the pan and I
                              put the short ends of the wires in the rim holes so there is a small
                              air gap at top(won't burn without)and pan is close enough to esbit.
                              Wood fire for supper and esbit for breakfast or in the rain. A 5 oz
                              chicken can or 6oz COS salmon can stove weighs 1.1 oz and is just
                              the right size for a 26oz beer can pot. Cans do rust and on a long
                              hike might need to be replaced periodically.
                              Patti


                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...>
                              wrote:
                              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
                              > <rgarling@y...> wrote:
                              > > > I am going back to the small wood stove I made a few
                              > > > years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic design
                              > > > idea.
                              > > be sure to take a look at Rick's web page about his wood
                              stoves.
                              > He
                              > > had some really good ideas. I shouldn't admit this, but I have
                              > > purchased a JetBoil.
                              >
                              > I've caught the woodstove bug as well. It turns out that there's
                              a
                              > small army of people out in the world working on how to make
                              cheap,
                              > efficient wood/biomass-fueled stoves, mostly for the third-world
                              > poor. Huge amounts of info on the net too--lots of calculations
                              > already worked out, plans, etcetera. The trick for backpackers is
                              > getting the weight down while retaining the efficiency. (If I
                              come
                              > up with anything I'll put it online.) Anyone have any
                              > recommendations as to which stove list/forum is the best?
                              >
                              > Doug Frost
                            • Sandy Kramer
                              about 6 years ago i arrived in oregon with the screw-on (propane butane) stove but the KOA didn t carry them and i had to drive around portland til i finally
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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                                about 6 years ago i arrived in oregon with the screw-on (propane butane) stove but the KOA didn't carry them and i had to drive around portland til i finally found an outfitters.

                                so i jumped when sportsmansguide had an alcohol and a wood-burning stove at really cheap prices. but, true to most of their stuff, lightweight is not a feature.

                                the alcohol is a cute little cup with a lid - the legs twist out - and it comes in a "leather" bag/

                                the wood one is really neat since it folds flat like a narrow paperback and also has a bag... i believe both have "loops" so you can hang onto belt or pack.

                                but i haven't had to use them...and am concerned about availability of denatured alcohol...I will take them on my next fly 'n camp trip, where weight is not an issue.

                                i tried a brief google but couldn't find them...i'm going kayak camping next weekend so i'll take them along to try them out.

                                Bill Fornshell <bfornshell@...> wrote:
                                My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new
                                design with some different materials and the new stove
                                should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight does not
                                count the battery for the small fan I use. I also use
                                the battery for my LED.

                                My wood stove's like my new alcohol stoves are
                                designed to use modern combustion theory and
                                techniques.

                                Bill in Texas



                                Sandy Kramer
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                              • zippydooda
                                HEET in the yellow bottle from an auto parts store or WalMart. Bill in Houston
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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                                  HEET in the yellow bottle from an auto parts store or WalMart.

                                  Bill in Houston

                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@y...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >and am concerned about availability of denatured alcohol...
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