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Re: just a small thanks

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  • dlfrost_1
    ... What did the Japanese think of hammock camping? Hopefully you ll have taken pictures of this trip and will post an account/journal. It d be interesting to
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 28, 2005
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ekunitz" <everettkunitz@h...>
      wrote:
      > I just finished an incredibly successful two week trip through the
      > mountains and coasts of Shikoku, Japan, and I`d like to take this
      > chance to thank everybody in this message group. My Hammock (HH
      > ulasym) became much more than just a shelter at the end of a day.


      What did the Japanese think of hammock camping? Hopefully you'll
      have taken pictures of this trip and will post an account/journal.
      It'd be interesting to see.

      Doug Frost
    • ekunitz
      doug, I unfortunately didn`t get any pictures whatsoever (I spent the last of my money on the hammock (no joke), and the planned purchase of a digital camera
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 29, 2005
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        doug,

        I unfortunately didn`t get any pictures whatsoever (I spent the last of
        my money on the hammock (no joke), and the planned purchase of a
        digital camera will have to wait). The hammock turned out to be quite a
        conversation opener. If I was setting up camp somewhere inhabited, I
        usally like to ask permission from the first person I meet. My Japanese
        is horrible, but when I mention "Hammock", everybodys eyes got really
        big. Most of the people who saw me setting up waited around until I
        invited them to try it out- in my experience the Japanese love anything
        new, gimmicky and even remotely useful. In fact, now that I think of
        it, I was turned down a prime camping spot until I mentioned that I`d
        be sleeping in a hammock and without making a fire. Turns out the guy
        was a sailor who spoke some english. He talked about how he used to
        have to sleep in a hammock in the big offshore fishing boats, stacked
        like "sakana" (fish). He layed down for all of five secods in my HH,
        and a smooth and heartfelt "sugoi!" (Amazing!) was all he had to say.
        Not only did he tell me I was more than welcome to sleep there, but he
        returned a bit later with some fruit from his wife`s garden. It was
        then that I understood the true potential of the hammock...


        everett

        p.s.- I would love to be able to get my journal online, but I don`t
        have anywhere to post. Where might one do that?

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...> wrote:
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ekunitz" <everettkunitz@h...>
        > wrote:
        > > I just finished an incredibly successful two week trip through the
        > > mountains and coasts of Shikoku, Japan, and I`d like to take this
        > > chance to thank everybody in this message group. My Hammock (HH
        > > ulasym) became much more than just a shelter at the end of a day.
        >
        >
        > What did the Japanese think of hammock camping? Hopefully you'll
        > have taken pictures of this trip and will post an account/journal.
        > It'd be interesting to see.
        >
        > Doug Frost
      • ekunitz
        Bill, I also read Mr. Weiss`s book, Echoes of Inscence . I read it after I`d decided that this was where I would be headed, and it was a great primer for what
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 29, 2005
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          Bill,

          I also read Mr. Weiss`s book, "Echoes of Inscence". I read it after
          I`d decided that this was where I would be headed, and it was a
          great primer for what to look out for. Unfortuatly, I couldn`t help
          but feel slightly misled. While road walking is mentioned in the
          book, I should warn anybody to expect at least 80% of the journey to
          be paved. As I understand it, it wasn`t always this way, and in fact
          many of today`s roadways follow the ancient routes path, but it is
          roads none the less. With cars. And convenience stores. A benefit in
          some ways, but it kind of completely destroys the whole esoteric
          part of the walk. I`m not sure I would have undertaken the adventure
          had I know this beforehand, but it is immpossible to get ahold of
          anything like a guidebook or topographical maps of the area from
          outside of Japan (where I planned as best I could without maps!) I
          speak a smattering of Japanese, mostly profanity and I can name most
          of what I ate. I hope.

          I undertook this first section of the walk in "Nojuku" style, which
          means sleeping outside unless offered shelter. Of the 13 days, I was
          offered 3 accomadations, ranging from a bell tower in the entrance
          gate of a temple to a cockroach infested all-night-prayer shack. I
          much preferred my hammock. I tied my HH to anything I could find,
          which included between a lampost and a pickup truck on a seawall,
          between the supporting pillars of a "Torii" (those famous japanese
          gateways) and in a bamboo thicket (I woke up in a rather saggy
          hammock, and thought maybe I`d missed a hitch or something. To my
          dismay, I discovered that both anchoring bamboo stalks (each must
          have been at least 10cm in diameter) were bent over and almost
          touching eachother. This was once I`d gotten OUT of the hammock.
          Apparently Bamboo doesn`t really have firm routing. Let this be a
          lesson to us all!). One night I tied up to what I thought was an
          electrical pole and a tree. When it got dark out, it turns out that
          I probably should have looked up and checked because I was stationed
          directly under a lampost. Not so stealthy; which could be a bad idea
          considering I was walking through a No Illegal camping area and had
          already been stopped once by the police that day. Luckily I was only
          woken up by a man practicing some sort of verbal and bodily taichi
          next to me. I guess I must have been in his favorite spot, because
          as I was packing up he kept casting nasty looks at between the
          threatening looking jab motions he was making with his hands. But it
          could have been just part of the excercise...

          Everett

          did it twice. Once in the winter (1993) in
          > reverse order like as he says most "Priest" do and
          > once during the spring same year. I always thought I
          > would like to do it.
          >
          > Last year I thought about a long AT hike. I planned
          > my 88 Shelter Pilgrimage. It turned out to be about
          > 1200 Kilometers just like the Shikoku walk. Springer
          > Mt to Catawba Mt Shelter 695.4 miles, 88 Shelters.
          >
          > When will you go back for the next part? Do you speak
          > Japanese? Did you sleep out each night?
          >
          > Bill in Texas
          >
          >
          > --- ekunitz <everettkunitz@h...> wrote:

          > > Yes, that exactly. Although, I deviated from the
          > > marked route as
          > > much as possible- I didn`t feel like walking next to
          > > highways!
          > > Although the 88 temples pilgrimage is really more of
          > > a walking
          > > journey, it does involve some fairly difficult and
          > > overgrown
          > > mountain paths and contending with the weather in
          > > Shikoku makes the
          > > journey difficult enough! I completed my first leg
          > > of the circular
          > > route, walking 330km from temple 1 to temple 29
          > > (basically ending in
          > > Kochi, at the first possible train station- there
          > > was a supposed 11
          > > force typhoon on my heels).
          > >
          > > everett
          > >
          > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill
          > > Fornshell
          > > <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
          > > > Evereet, Did you do part of the route of the 88
          > > > Temples of Shikoku?
          > > >
          > > > Bill in Texas
          > > >
          > > > --- ekunitz <everettkunitz@h...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > Hello!
          > > > >
          > > > > I just finished an incredibly successful two
          > > week
          > > > > trip through the
          > > > > mountains and coasts of Shikoku, Japan, and I`d
          > > like
          > > > > to take this
          > > > > chance to thank everybody in this message group.
          > > My
          > > > > Hammock (HH
          > > > > ulasym) became much more than just a shelter at
          > > the
          > > > > end of a day. It
          > > > > rocked me to sleep, provided a writing chair,
          > > and
          > > > > not to mention
          > > > > quick escape from rain (and rain there was.
          > > > > Everything from a happy
          > > > > sun shower to gumball size drops of water). It
          > > was
          > > > > such a breeze
          > > > > setting up everytime, that I no longer had to
          > > look
          > > > > for camp two ours
          > > > > before sun down like I usually like to. I was so
          > > > > excited the first
          > > > > few times I used it before I set out, and was
          > > sure
          > > > > that the novelty
          > > > > would wear off once I had to do a rain setup
          > > after a
          > > > > 30km day, but I
          > > > > found myself actually looking forward to
          > > pitching
          > > > > the hammock and
          > > > > making camp- half of the fun of this shelter is
          > > > > working it into a
          > > > > desired space. I`m so used to using a tent that
          > > I
          > > > > just figured that
          > > > > the old square peg and round hole rule would
          > > apply
          > > > > with the hammock
          > > > > as well. To my delight, the hammock seems to
          > > operate
          > > > > more like a
          > > > > fluid than a solid- it will pretty much just
          > > conform
          > > > > to any place
          > > > > you can string it up (and I was afraid this
          > > would be
          > > > > a problem- but
          > > > > once you figure out how much distance you need,
          > > > > potential hammock
          > > > > `anchors` are everywhere) and rock you gently to
          > > > > sleep OFF THE
          > > > > GROUND! Once again thank you to all who have
          > > posted,
          > > > > asked
          > > > > questions, answered questions, and especially
          > > those
          > > > > who have
          > > > > speculated about hammocking possibilities. I
          > > think
          > > > > that my mobility
          > > > > has almost doubled with this shelter, while
          > > cutting
          > > > > my shelter
          > > > > weight in half!
          > > > >
          > > > > everett
          >
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        • J J
          ... www.trailjournals.com __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 29, 2005
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            > p.s.- I would love to be able to get my journal online, but I don`t
            > have anywhere to post. Where might one do that?

            www.trailjournals.com


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          • dlfrost_1
            ... last of ... You mean to tell me that you could not find a cheepie film camera anywhere in Japan ? ;-) Darned shame tho... ... he ... Hey, I ll have to
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 29, 2005
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ekunitz" <everettkunitz@h...>
              wrote:
              > I unfortunately didn`t get any pictures whatsoever (I spent the
              last of
              > my money on the hammock (no joke), and the planned purchase of a
              > digital camera will have to wait).

              You mean to tell me that you could not find a cheepie film camera
              anywhere in Japan ? ;-) Darned shame tho...

              > Not only did he tell me I was more than welcome to sleep there, but
              he
              > returned a bit later with some fruit from his wife`s garden. It was
              > then that I understood the true potential of the hammock...

              Hey, I'll have to try this... heh.

              Doug Frost
            • ekunitz
              Doug, This trip was also my first experiment into the realm of the lightweight. I was trying to leave EVERYTHING out of my pack. In retrospect, I probably
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 30, 2005
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                Doug,

                This trip was also my first experiment into the realm of the
                lightweight. I was trying to leave EVERYTHING out of my pack. In
                retrospect, I probably could have traded the four extra stakes I was
                carrying for a disposable camera, as the stakes don`t really have
                anything relevant to say about the trip (they didn`t once come out of
                my pack). It is a darned shame I didn`t get any photos.
                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...> wrote:
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ekunitz" <everettkunitz@h...>
                > wrote:
                > > I unfortunately didn`t get any pictures whatsoever (I spent the
                > last of
                > > my money on the hammock (no joke), and the planned purchase of a
                > > digital camera will have to wait).
                >
                > You mean to tell me that you could not find a cheepie film camera
                > anywhere in Japan ? ;-) Darned shame tho...
                >
                > > Not only did he tell me I was more than welcome to sleep there, but
                > he
                > > returned a bit later with some fruit from his wife`s garden. It was
                > > then that I understood the true potential of the hammock...
                >
                > Hey, I'll have to try this... heh.
                >
                > Doug Frost
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