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9946Re: [Hammock Camping] new intro with a few questions

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  • Dick Matthews
    Aug 4, 2005
      Bruce,

      Life is about choices.

      I applaud the choice to get into the backcountry rather than hang around
      on the couch.

      For those that need help getting into the backcountry a pack goat is a
      very good choice.

      Everything you said is 100% on the mark.

      My mother was allergic to cow's milk so I grew up around goats. They
      make excellent pets and are a lot of fun. We gave our milk goats about
      a pound of sweet grain a day. Those goofy goats could be standing hock
      deep in blue grass and still climb over a fence to get to a thistle - go
      figure.

      The family of my daughter's best friend has llamas. I have been invited
      to take them out anytime I want, but I never do for exactly the reasons
      you state. They give their llamas sweet grain.

      Black bears would not be a problem, but goats would make great mountain
      lion chow.

      Dick Matthews



      Bruce W. Calkins wrote:

      >>In my opinion a goat makes a better pack option then any other species.
      >>
      >>
      >Quite possible, for moderate loads and rough trails. The rougher the
      >trail, the lighter the pack needs to be. Also the heaver the pack the
      >less the goat enjoys the hike. And when a goat digs in it's heels, you
      >aren't going anywhere.
      >
      >
      >
      >>Dessert goats can go days without watter if nessesary so they can easally
      >>go all day drinking from the only avalable creek once that day.
      >>
      >>
      >Dessert goats, perhaps. Normal breeds WILL need water more often.
      >Especially while working. You will need to keep them away from the
      >water source too, they are as sloppy in their toilet as any other pack
      >animal.
      >
      >
      >
      >>As far as feed they get all they nead with the ocational bite wile packing.
      >>They nead total (for my area) about 2 15 minite
      >>grazing periods easally done after camp is made.
      >>
      >>
      >A working pack goat WILL need some grain/prepared feed. Browsing will
      >not provide enough for the HIGH energy output of packing.
      >
      >
      >
      >>They are like deer, they have feet like deer so they don't erode the trails.
      >>
      >>
      >Apparently you have not seen a busy game trail.
      >
      >
      >
      >>They don't trample vegitation like other pack animals.
      >>
      >>
      >Less perhaps, still they have feet.
      >
      >
      >
      >>Basically a goat is a great "leave no trace" pack alternitive.
      >>
      >>
      >I've tracked goats when they got out of the paddock. They do leave traces.
      >
      >
      >
      >>Well trained pck goats never nead to be tied they won't stray from camp
      >>
      >>
      >And might attract bears and/or large cats.
      >
      >
      >
      >>Pack goats rock ;)
      >>
      >>
      >True, as long as you stay within their limitations.
      >
      >IMHO; Taking any animal increases my work load. While I might be able
      >to reduce a 20 pound weekend pack load a bit, I'm constantly picking up
      >after, checking pack condition, fetching water, taking extra breaks and
      >so on. And that's just with 1 dog. A pack animal would be more work
      >for me than hiking without.
      >
      >Bruce W.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >



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