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6451Re: 3/32" Hammock Hanging Rope?

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  • Ralph Oborn
    Aug 4, 2004
      To engineer the straps/ropes how big of a safety factor do you plan
      on?
      If I weigh 200 lbs. and hang at 40°. then my static load on each
      rope is 155 lbs. is a rope with 5oo lbs. breaking strength enough?
      1000 lbs? 1500 lbs?




      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
      <rgarling@y...> wrote:
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...>
      wrote:
      > This is what I have evolved to. I found the bulk and weight of the
      > 30 ft of webbing rather too much for my tastes. I used what I had
      > to make two 10' "tree huggers" (rather long, but some trees here in
      > the PNW really require it).
      >
      > One thing about ropes & trees. I've noticed that most of the
      > rubbing/friction is in the first 1/4 turn of the rope around the
      > tree. By the time you get to ropes about 5/16" diameter there is
      no
      > significant damage (but some slight cosmetic scraping). I made
      some
      > pads to protect this 1/4 turn, and a similar idea might work on
      the
      > thinner cords. You might try some thick wall tubing for that
      area
      > to act as a pad.
      >
      > Concerning breaking strength: I found the following rule of thumb
      > for nylon rope on the Internet. (I have observed that woven
      > polyester rope seems to have slightly higher breaking strength
      than
      > predicted by this formula.)
      >
      > breaking strength = <circumference of line in inches> x 2,400
      >
      > so
      > 1/8" cord - .3927" in circumference = 942 pounds breaking strength
      > 3/16" cord - .589" C = 1413
      > 1/4" rope - .75" C = 1809 pounds breaking strength
      > 5/16" rope - .98" C = 2356
      > 3/8" rope - 1.18" C = 2827 pounds breaking strength
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