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Re: Cement Ball of Weight and WISGEN diagrams

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  • Justin Szymanek
    Hi Mike! ... plate! Thanks! I finally figured out how to make materials reflect properly in 3d max. It looks good I think. ... only ... Otherwise, ... Nothing
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 5, 2000
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      Hi Mike!

      > Justin,
      >
      > Really nice rendering! I like the reflection in the upper base
      plate!


      Thanks! I finally figured out how to make materials reflect properly
      in 3d max. It looks good I think.


      > I was checking out the hamel drawings on Dan's site. 17.JPG was the
      > one...I like that you are using magnets at the cone rims instead of
      > the 'cone riders'. But by having the small butterfly cone get it's
      > rim support from the large butterfly, I think the riders are the
      only
      > way. If you want to use magnets, the small butterfly needs to get
      > it's own magnetic support from the wall, just like a 3CD.
      Otherwise,
      > I don't think you will get the break in the cones.


      Nothing is written in stone yet, and if it doesn't break into the
      isotope line properly I will change it. Chris and I have discussed
      it,
      and this is the intial design I plan to go by. I have not been able
      to
      make the cone riders work, so I am using magnets to center the cones.
      The ball is very heavy, and it will not have to move very much off
      center to create a strong push down to one side. I am pretty sure the
      cones will vibrate out of phase with this setup.

      I am using magnets to hold the ball centered instead of a inverted
      cone. Sorta like the super-mini. This will allow the ball to spin and
      move around the top of the butterfly. The isotope line will compress,
      and since the vibration is out of phase, as the wave comes back up it
      will make the area in front of the ball lower, since it is ahead of
      the itself when it was going down. The ball falls downwards
      (vertically) continuously by moving in elliptical patterns, and the
      isotope line twisting out from under it. So as it dances around the
      center line, it falls, forward, but in a since, also downward.
      Falling down, but never getting any closer to the ground. It is hard
      to describe, but I can see how it works in my head. I will describe
      more later. I should get my homework due today done. Thrus. is my
      "easy" day. I have lots of spares to catch up for the week.
      -Justin-
    • Mike Morrissey
      ... I noticed that! I m glad the discovery isn t going to waste! Justin, I have to add my notes to your sphere/cement discussion: One more idea for a good
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 5, 2000
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        --- In hameltech@egroups.com, "Justin Szymanek" <jszymanek2000@y...>
        > I am using magnets to hold the ball centered instead of a inverted
        > cone. Sorta like the super-mini.

        I noticed that! I'm glad the discovery isn't going to waste!

        Justin,

        I have to add my notes to your sphere/cement discussion:

        One more idea for a good Weight Ball is one of those decorative
        gazing balls that people put in their yards. You can get them for 10-
        20 bucks at 1/2 price store, or maybe Hobby Lobby. If you take it off
        the stand, it looks like a huge christmas tree ball, with a little
        nipple opening about the size of a milk gallon lid. You can spoon in
        your cement, and then just leave the plastic ball on it! That way,
        you won't have to sand the cement smooth. Also, keep your eye on the
        classified ads for used bowling balls, or maybe ebay!

        About the cement, I will have to break out my notes from college. As
        a civil engineer, I took several courses on concrete design. We even
        built a canoe out of concrete and raced them with the Big 8 schools!
        Custom mix properties are easy to calculate, when you know what your
        desired result is. For you, you want as strong as possible using
        standard cement, and no rocks. Really, rocks help the strength, and
        if you are using a good form, they wont hurt the smoothness. The only
        bad thing is a uniform mix. So I would suggest a peagravel-sand-
        cement-water mix. I can calculate the ratios for whatever you want to
        use, though. I need to brush up on it anyways, since my licensing
        exam is coming up! Let me know.

        About the water content, you are right---too much water weakens the
        final set. But not enough water will cause your set to crumble
        because the chemical reaction needs the water (that's why your hands
        hurt like hell after you work with it a while---it reacts with the
        moisture in your hands). So the RIGHT amount of water is perfect.
        (that sounds redundant). Once you mix it with the right amount, you
        can increase the strength even more with a slow,damp set. Standard
        cement from the store has full strength (99%)in 7 days, and about 85%
        in 5 days. But you can handle it in like a single day. It will
        continue to get stronger over the years for that last 1%. Wraping it
        in wet cloth and misting the cloth periodically is a good way to keep
        the water from evaporating out before it reacts with the cement. My
        point is, cement is a chemical reaction, not a drying sort of thing
        like glue. It's more like epoxy....if you don't have the right amount
        of A and B it won't set right. A 'soupy' mix is best. Imagine
        builting a sand castle out of it, but not quite being able to,
        because it is just a bit too wet. There's a thing called 'slump'. You
        pack your mix in a tower shaped mold about 12" tall and 6" wide at
        the bottom, and 4" wide at the top. Then you slip the mold off. If
        the cement slumps 2"-3" down at the top, your are on the right track.
        (I know you don't own a slump cone equipment set, but that may give
        you a bit of an idea of the consistency)

        Good Luck, it looks very promising!

        Mike Mo.
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