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how to draw the measurement of the cone

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  • curious4567890
    I have a hard time understanding the explanation of the hamel plans regarding the drawing of the measurement to the aluminum flashing and where to cut the
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 9, 2005
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      I have a hard time understanding the explanation of the hamel plans
      regarding the drawing of the measurement to the aluminum flashing and
      where to cut the cones , especially the bisecting lines .
      Kindly explain to me in step by step in illustration on how to draw
      the measurement with a big compass and where to cut the aluminum
      flashing for making the cones .
    • Matt Rock
      If you are building according the MPM or Star Of David, you have to use mathematics to figure out the angles which will sweep out onto the surface of the
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 9, 2005
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        If you are building according the MPM or Star Of David, you have to
        use mathematics to figure out the angles which will sweep out onto
        the surface of the aluminum. Example:

        One cone, MPM, with 60 degrees in the cone cross section.

        If your cones are 10 inches in diameter, therefore keep in mind, 10
        inches.
        10 " = 31.415926 " circumference
        Length on side of cone = 10 "

        The 10" on lenght of side can be seen as a radius. Therefore, to keep
        things equal, 10" x 2 = 20"
        20" X PI = 62.831853"

        You now have two parameters for the outside skin, one being the top
        edge of 31.41...." and the other 62.831852"

        To get to an appropriate angle for cutting, you would take these
        numbers and do some basic math:

        (62.83 - 31.41)/62.83 X 360 = 180 degrees

        this would be the amount that isn't required in the cone, but since
        it is 180, subtracting 180 from 360 = 180 still.

        Therefore, scribe the circle to your desired radius, and use 180
        degrees of the material.

        To get the inner cone, some knowledge of sacred geometry or a
        drawing handy would help.
        For this example, if the diameter is 10, then the height of the cone,
        based upon MPM, would be 1.154...times smaller or 8.66 inches.

        The inner cone's apex must rest at 2/3rds from the tip of the outer
        cone or 1/3rd from the top outer cone edge.

        Taking the known height of the cone as being 8.66, multiply by
        2/3rds, and get 5.77. The inner cone apex must be positioned 5.77
        inches above outer cone tip. This 5.77 is also being reflected in the
        inner cones sides. Therefore, this number has importance. 5.77 is a
        radius for the inner cone. 5.77 X 2 = 11.54 X PI = 36.25 circum

        already knowing the 10" diameter, as being about 31.41:
        we need to subtract and divide and multiply:

        (36.25-31.41)/36.25 X 360 = 48 degrees

        This will have to subtracted from 360 to yield: 312

        Your inner cone would then be using a radius of 5.77, you'd sweep out
        a circle and remove 48 degrees. The remainder of 312 is used to build
        the cone.

        Hope that helps

        Matt








        --- In hameltech@yahoogroups.com, "curious4567890"
        <curious4567890@y...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I have a hard time understanding the explanation of the hamel
        plans
        > regarding the drawing of the measurement to the aluminum flashing
        and
        > where to cut the cones , especially the bisecting lines .
        > Kindly explain to me in step by step in illustration on how to
        draw
        > the measurement with a big compass and where to cut the aluminum
        > flashing for making the cones .
      • Clifford Shearer
        HI! Some time ago I made a handy tool for making a cone pattern. I don t know if it s original but it works without math. I started with a disk made from thin
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 9, 2005
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          HI!
          Some time ago I made a handy tool for making a cone pattern.
          I don't know if it's original but it works without math.
          I started with a disk made from thin cardboard (like that on the back
          of a note pad)...the diameter of the disk is the same as the wide
          diameter of you cone.
          You can use a protractor to mark any special degree positions on the
          disk...you will want to make at least one mark which will be the
          Start/Finish of your cone arc.
          Next, fasten a wood dowel through the center of the disk (make sure
          the disk can rotate freely and put a small "brad" through it next to
          the free end...it will be the same distance from the brad to the disk
          as the desired "height" of the cone.
          You now have "cliff's Cone (Cone-Head?) Compass"
          To use it, the brad point becomes the compass pivot and the wheel
          will roll around in an arc which you trace along with a pencil or
          scribe, starting and endig at your "stat/finish" mark. If you had any
          special degree markings they can also be transferred at the same time.
          By the way, you can add a overlap tab for fastening, if needed.

          Cliff Shearer

          --- In hameltech@yahoogroups.com, "curious4567890"
          <curious4567890@y...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > I have a hard time understanding the explanation of the hamel
          plans
          > regarding the drawing of the measurement to the aluminum flashing
          and
          > where to cut the cones , especially the bisecting lines .
          > Kindly explain to me in step by step in illustration on how to
          draw
          > the measurement with a big compass and where to cut the aluminum
          > flashing for making the cones .
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