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HAL on Macintosh computers

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  • peter_andersonstewart
    Hi, Peter Hopford has asked if I ll post an e-mail I sent to him earlier today relating a few points on the use of HAL in virtual machines on Macs and on HAL
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 9, 2011
      Hi, Peter Hopford has asked if I'll post an e-mail I sent to him earlier today relating a few points on the use of HAL in virtual machines on Macs and on HAL running on a Mac started up running Microsoft Windows (via Boot Camp).

      The below is just a cut and paste from the original e-mail, so please feel free to ask any questions.

      I made some screenshots of of HAL being run in emulation, but I'm unsure of how to post them other than in the Photos folder here;

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/halsraceresults/photos/album/834286036/pic/list

      Cheers, Peter

      ....................................

      Dear Peter, hi,

      I am, primarily an Apple person, been using them since the late 1970s in nuclear medicine and medical research, the first time I've ever owned an IBM is when I put HAL into the RPEYC after working it up on the Mac.

      There are a number of programs and ways of running HAL (or any Windows program) on a Mac and they depend on what sort of Mac you have.

      The Macs from 1995 up until around 2005 used what is known as the Power PC processor (developed by the consortium of Apple IBM and Motorola which IBM still use for their mainframes and super-computers Big Blue et al) use a program called Virtual PC which is what I used when originally investigating HAL prior to putting it into the RPEYC.

      Virtual PC was once an independent developer, but it proved too big a threat to Microsoft so it was bought out by MS about five or six years ago and I'm not sure whether it is being further developed (but is easily available via eBay).

      It comes bundled generally with whatever iteration of Windows was going around at the time (anything from Windows 95 to Vista from memory).

      Virtual PC can be adequately run on anything from the original iMac (1998) through to the last of the Power PC processor Macs (the G5 iMacs, the G5 towers or the G4 PowerBooks).

      To run Virtual PC relatively quickly, you need to have a Mac with around 1 GB or more RAM.

      The next step up the ladder is the Macs using the Intel processors (2006 to the present). Whilst you can use Virtual PC on these machines, it is far better to use one of the emulation programs or direct boot into Windows on the Mac.

      I have only used the one emulation program, Parallels, which runs at the native speed of the processor. There are no real "wrinkles" to running this (or any other) emulation program as it links to all the printers, networks, peripherals and the internet via the Mac and shares all the Mac folders and disks.

      If you wish, you can "sandbox" it so that it doesn't share, but that kind of defeats the point.

      In addition, it has a number of modes which changes how the "window" containing Windows is seen.

      It can either appear as a discrete window containing Windows and whatever program is running in Windows in it, or HAL (or whatever other Windows program) running within the Mac environment.

      The other main emulation program, VMware Fusion, I have had no experience of, but from all accounts, it seems to be fine.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_VMware_Fusion_and_Parallels_Desktop

      The final method is to direct boot into Windows at start-up. This is achieved merely by selecting which operating system (it appears as two hard disks) you wish to start up in by holding down the Option (Alt) key at start-up when the start-up chime sounds.

      The only cost here is the cost of whatever version of Windows you care to run (Boot Camp, the Apple program that allows this, is free with the computer).

      Once started in Windows, it for all intents and purposes, an IBM machine, no different to any other running Windows.

      I'll attach some screenshots to show the various arrangements.

      Overall, there really are no problems installing and using HAL via either emulation or via directly booting into Windows at start-up via Boot Camp on the Mac.

      However, bear in mind my experience has only been with Windows 98, 2000 and XP Pro, I really cannot comment on things like Vista and Windows 7.

      In the final reduction, there are a number of methods of running HAL on a Mac:

      For the older Macs (Power PCs) Virtual PC http://www.microsoft.com

      For post-2006 Macs, Parallels http://www.parallels.com

      or VMware Fusion http://www.vmware.com

      Boot Camp, allowing the Mac to boot directly into Windows is the final alternative:

      http://www.apple.com/macosx/compatibility

      http://www.apple.com/support/bootcamp

      Any Mac made since 2006 will have adequate resources to run Parallels, VMware Fusion or Windows via Boot Camp without too much of a hiccough.

      I hope that this information is of some use to the others considering running HAL on Macs.
    • phopford
      Thanks for posting this, Peter. An increasing number of people want to run HAL on Macs, so this is very timely.
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 9, 2011
        Thanks for posting this, Peter.
        An increasing number of people want to run HAL on Macs, so this is very timely.

        --- In halsraceresults@yahoogroups.com, "peter_andersonstewart" <nucmed@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, Peter Hopford has asked if I'll post an e-mail I sent to him earlier today relating a few points on the use of HAL in virtual machines on Macs and on HAL running on a Mac started up running Microsoft Windows (via Boot Camp).
        >
        > The below is just a cut and paste from the original e-mail, so please feel free to ask any questions.
        >
        > I made some screenshots of of HAL being run in emulation, but I'm unsure of how to post them other than in the Photos folder here;
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/halsraceresults/photos/album/834286036/pic/list
        >
        > Cheers, Peter
        >
        > ....................................
        >
        > Dear Peter, hi,
        >
        > I am, primarily an Apple person, been using them since the late 1970s in nuclear medicine and medical research, the first time I've ever owned an IBM is when I put HAL into the RPEYC after working it up on the Mac.
        >
        > There are a number of programs and ways of running HAL (or any Windows program) on a Mac and they depend on what sort of Mac you have.
        >
        > The Macs from 1995 up until around 2005 used what is known as the Power PC processor (developed by the consortium of Apple IBM and Motorola which IBM still use for their mainframes and super-computers Big Blue et al) use a program called Virtual PC which is what I used when originally investigating HAL prior to putting it into the RPEYC.
        >
        > Virtual PC was once an independent developer, but it proved too big a threat to Microsoft so it was bought out by MS about five or six years ago and I'm not sure whether it is being further developed (but is easily available via eBay).
        >
        > It comes bundled generally with whatever iteration of Windows was going around at the time (anything from Windows 95 to Vista from memory).
        >
        > Virtual PC can be adequately run on anything from the original iMac (1998) through to the last of the Power PC processor Macs (the G5 iMacs, the G5 towers or the G4 PowerBooks).
        >
        > To run Virtual PC relatively quickly, you need to have a Mac with around 1 GB or more RAM.
        >
        > The next step up the ladder is the Macs using the Intel processors (2006 to the present). Whilst you can use Virtual PC on these machines, it is far better to use one of the emulation programs or direct boot into Windows on the Mac.
        >
        > I have only used the one emulation program, Parallels, which runs at the native speed of the processor. There are no real "wrinkles" to running this (or any other) emulation program as it links to all the printers, networks, peripherals and the internet via the Mac and shares all the Mac folders and disks.
        >
        > If you wish, you can "sandbox" it so that it doesn't share, but that kind of defeats the point.
        >
        > In addition, it has a number of modes which changes how the "window" containing Windows is seen.
        >
        > It can either appear as a discrete window containing Windows and whatever program is running in Windows in it, or HAL (or whatever other Windows program) running within the Mac environment.
        >
        > The other main emulation program, VMware Fusion, I have had no experience of, but from all accounts, it seems to be fine.
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_VMware_Fusion_and_Parallels_Desktop
        >
        > The final method is to direct boot into Windows at start-up. This is achieved merely by selecting which operating system (it appears as two hard disks) you wish to start up in by holding down the Option (Alt) key at start-up when the start-up chime sounds.
        >
        > The only cost here is the cost of whatever version of Windows you care to run (Boot Camp, the Apple program that allows this, is free with the computer).
        >
        > Once started in Windows, it for all intents and purposes, an IBM machine, no different to any other running Windows.
        >
        > I'll attach some screenshots to show the various arrangements.
        >
        > Overall, there really are no problems installing and using HAL via either emulation or via directly booting into Windows at start-up via Boot Camp on the Mac.
        >
        > However, bear in mind my experience has only been with Windows 98, 2000 and XP Pro, I really cannot comment on things like Vista and Windows 7.
        >
        > In the final reduction, there are a number of methods of running HAL on a Mac:
        >
        > For the older Macs (Power PCs) Virtual PC http://www.microsoft.com
        >
        > For post-2006 Macs, Parallels http://www.parallels.com
        >
        > or VMware Fusion http://www.vmware.com
        >
        > Boot Camp, allowing the Mac to boot directly into Windows is the final alternative:
        >
        > http://www.apple.com/macosx/compatibility
        >
        > http://www.apple.com/support/bootcamp
        >
        > Any Mac made since 2006 will have adequate resources to run Parallels, VMware Fusion or Windows via Boot Camp without too much of a hiccough.
        >
        > I hope that this information is of some use to the others considering running HAL on Macs.
        >
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