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Re: [hackers-il] Is Capitalism the Ideal or the State of the Art?

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  • Oleg Goldshmidt
    Allow me to re-arrange your posting a bit to put the following two statements together: ... ;-) I wholeheartedly agree with both statements. Having studied
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 3, 2001
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      Allow me to re-arrange your posting a bit to put the following two
      statements together:

      "Nadav Har'El" <nyh@...> writes:

      > Of course, there are several technical issues I didn't mention because I
      > thought that everybody knows about them and they are straightforward to
      > think about

      > Thermodynamics is actually a very interesting subject, but quite difficult
      > to comprehend at first (I still don't think I fully understand it all).

      ;-)

      I wholeheartedly agree with both statements. Having studied physics
      for quite a few years, and worked in the area, 10% I tend to think that
      everybody knows everything relevant, and 90% of the time I am baffled
      by things I can't understand...

      > course), and how to actually manufacture the object in question (this is
      > a seperate issue all together - see for example the best-seller "Nano" about
      > nanotechnology).

      By Ed Regis? Is it worth reading? The Amazon reviews are mixed at
      best...

      > if you don't like to use the E=MC^2 theory for that

      No, I don't. I don't know how to handle antimatter that is implicitly
      involved in this formula... ;-)

      > So you if you have mass you have plenty of energy - it's getting rid of all
      > that entropy which is the problem.

      I just mentioned another one, a purre technicality, of course.

      > > Check the subject - we have wandered very far from it, haven't we?
      >
      > Not really!

      I forgot to put a smiley there.

      > The thermodynamic issue was only one of the issues I raised.

      Maintaining income gap as a means of keeping the world's entropy in
      check? [NB: no smiley here]

      > P.S. If you consider this only as a philosphical question, not a question
      > with physical issues, it becomes a pointless question.

      <troll> That's true about any question, isn't it? </troll>

      --
      Oleg Goldshmidt | ogoldshmidt@...
      "I'd rather write programs to write programs than write programs."
    • Nadav Har'El
      ... Yes, it s by Ed Regis. It s mostly a biography of Eric Drexler (see www.foresight.org), some guy who dabbled in the issues of nanotechnology (mostly
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 3, 2001
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        On Tue, Apr 03, 2001, Oleg Goldshmidt wrote about "Re: [hackers-il] Is Capitalism the Ideal or the State of the Art?":
        > > course), and how to actually manufacture the object in question (this is
        > > a seperate issue all together - see for example the best-seller "Nano" about
        > > nanotechnology).
        >
        > By Ed Regis? Is it worth reading? The Amazon reviews are mixed at
        > best...

        Yes, it's by Ed Regis. It's mostly a biography of Eric Drexler (see
        www.foresight.org), some guy who dabbled in the issues of nanotechnology
        (mostly talking, in my opinion). It isn't one of the greatest books I've
        read, I have to admit. A lot more talk and politics than actual technical
        details. You might say it was _slightly_ interesting, not more than that.

        >
        > > if you don't like to use the E=MC^2 theory for that
        >
        > No, I don't. I don't know how to handle antimatter that is implicitly
        > involved in this formula... ;-)

        Ooops... You're right... I forgot about the other laws of conservation,
        like conservation of baryonic number (or whatever it called, you know
        that quantatity that protons and neutrons have 1 of and electrons or
        photons have 0) and spin (bosons like photons have whole numbers, fermions
        like protons and neutrons have half numbers) and charge. So that I guess if
        these laws of conservation are not overruled by the "grand unified theory",
        whatever that will be, you'll need to either keep the same numbers and types
        of elementary particles in your original "raw" material, or be prepared to
        handle the extra matter (or anti-matter).

        Sounds complicated, but seems a lot better than keeping seperate stocks
        of chemical elements lying around. "Damn, I ran out of chloride. Now all
        my food will taste bland." :)

        --
        Nadav Har'El | Tuesday, Apr 3 2001, 11 Nisan 5761
        nyh@... |-----------------------------------------
        Phone: +972-53-245868, ICQ 13349191 |Early bird gets the worm, but the second
        http://nadav.harel.org.il |mouse gets the cheese.
      • Oleg Goldshmidt
        ... As I said earlier, keep a star around (a yellow G-type would do quite nicely, thank you), point the remote at it, and press the fast forward button... ;-)
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 4, 2001
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          "Nadav Har'El" <nyh@...> writes:

          > Sounds complicated, but seems a lot better than keeping seperate stocks
          > of chemical elements lying around.

          As I said earlier, keep a star around (a yellow G-type would do quite
          nicely, thank you), point the remote at it, and press the fast forward
          button... ;-)

          --
          Oleg Goldshmidt | ogoldshmidt@...
          "I'd rather write programs to write programs than write programs."
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