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Re: [hackers-il] The dream retinue for star programmers

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  • Gilad Ben-Yossef
    ... To comment on some previous comments regarding how does one knows whether she is a star programer? then I guess my answer would be: If you happen to work
    Message 1 of 23 , Dec 10, 2000
      Omer Zak wrote:

      > Here is a question to the real star programmers among us:

      To comment on some previous comments regarding "how does one knows
      whether she is a star programer?" then I guess my answer would be:

      If you happen to work for a multinational corporation and you happen to
      drive back to your (company supplied) home in a Southern California
      "gated community" (3 pools, tennis courts, electric gates) by the
      wonderful (Really!) road going between Malibu and Thousand Oaks, and
      while driving the (company supplied) car you happen to hit a car going
      the other way and totally trash your and the other drivers car (but no
      one gets hurt) and the company simply sends you a new car and have their
      lawyers take care of everything for you, without you having to to pay a
      penny, display insurance papers etc. then you must be a star programer :-)

      <sigh> Yes, I was once that good... ;-))

      Now seriously, you seem to describe something very similar to the
      "Surgical Team" that Fred Brooks describes in chapter 3 of the now
      famous "The Mythical Man-Month". Since I can't quote the entire chapter
      I'd advice you to go read the book. It's boring as hell, but still very
      important.

      Besides it (the book) makes a hell of a crushing answer when some dumb
      ass pointy haired manager tries to convince you to take in new team
      members to try and make a late project deliver on time and you go:
      "That will only make the project *MORE* late, not less!" and he goes:
      "Says who?". At this point I simply send them the title and the ISBN of
      the book and a link to it on Amazon.. ;-)

      I always thought the Surgical Team idea is very good except of the
      social implications but never heard of any place this actually got tried
      out in.

      Interestingly, once can think of the Open Source development model
      presented by Linux and ilk as a sort of Surgical Team development:
      The developers write code, someone else tests, yet someone else
      documents (well, maybe... ;-) This in addition to many of the
      "communication and administration" functions becoming unnecessary
      because of the extremely low cost of communication.
      Well, maybe I'm stretching it too far...

      Gilad.

      --
      Gilad Ben-Yossef <gilad@...>
      http://benyossef.com :: +972(54)756701
      "Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong, while interrupts are disabled. "
      -- Murphey's law of kernel programing.
    • Shlomi Fish
      ... Then subscribe to shlomif-tpdos-subscribe@vipe.technion.ac.il and I ll send notices there whenever I update it. God bless ezmlm. Regards, Shlomi Fish ...
      Message 2 of 23 , Dec 11, 2000
        On Sun, 10 Dec 2000, Chen Shapira wrote:

        >
        > >
        > > Well, I decided to maintain a list of addresses of people who are
        > > interested in daily or even more frequent updates to when the story is
        > > updated. E-mail me if you wish to be added.
        >
        > I'm interested.
        >

        Then subscribe to shlomif-tpdos-subscribe@... and I'll
        send notices there whenever I update it. God bless ezmlm.

        Regards,

        Shlomi Fish

        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > hackers-il-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        >



        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        Shlomi Fish shlomif@...
        Home Page: http://t2.technion.ac.il/~shlomif/
        Home E-mail: shlomif@...

        The prefix "God Said" has the extraordinary logical property of
        converting any statement that follows it into a true one.
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