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Re: [hackers-il] New Essay: "Why Closed Books are So 19th Century"

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  • Shlomi Fish
    ... Doesn t seem like something I d approve of. Books should be made available online soon after the publication. It is possible to give some time for the book
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 19, 2008
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      On Thursday 19 June 2008, Amit Aronovitch wrote:
      > Did not read the whole thing, but what are your opinions regarding
      > "temporarily closed" books, like the "World Price" method used by
      > Travis Oliphant for the numpy book?
      >
      > http://www.tramy.us
      > http://www.tramy.us/FAQ.html

      Doesn't seem like something I'd approve of. Books should be made available
      online soon after the publication. It is possible to give some time for the
      book to be successful commercially (a few months or so) before making it
      publically available. But the "temporarily" closed model that Travis Oliphant
      proposes (while carrying licence restrictions) is not much better than
      all-the-way closed books.

      Regards,

      Shlomi Fish

      >
      > On Thu, Jun 19, 2008 at 5:57 PM, Shlomi Fish <shlomif@...> wrote:
      > > Hi all!
      > >
      > > See:
      > >
      > > http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/philosophy/closed-books-are-so-19th-
      > >century/
      > >
      > > for a new essay I've written that tries to convince authors to make
      > > everything they write publically available online (without registration,
      > > payment, etc.).
      > >
      > > I mention Perl and Ruby there specifically.
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > >
      > > Shlomi Fish



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      Shlomi Fish http://www.shlomifish.org/
      "The Human Hacking Field Guide" - http://xrl.us/bjn8q

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