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Re: Java [was Re: [hackers-il] In need of Guidens]

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  • Shlomi Fish
    ... Hmmm... OK. Is JPackage as comprehensive as CPAN? How easy is it to submit packages there. Can I use it to install cross-platform packages? yum is an RPM
    Message 1 of 44 , Dec 14, 2004
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      On Wednesday 15 December 2004 00:11, Evgeny Gesin wrote:
      > Shlomi,
      > with yum tool and right JPackage repositories you can search and
      > install, remove, upgrade third party java software as easy as you do
      > in CPAN.

      Hmmm... OK. Is JPackage as comprehensive as CPAN? How easy is it to submit
      packages there. Can I use it to install cross-platform packages?

      yum is an RPM tool. It installs binary pre-compiled packages. In CPAN, you can
      install everything from source, which will run on any problem. And what about
      JNI code?

      You can probably do the same with apt and urpmi. Mandrake has a JPackage
      repository.

      >
      > By the way, I used CPAN when installed Razor and Spamassasin for
      > QMail. Can you tell me please, how to remove some unnecessary modules
      > in CPAN?

      The CPANPLUS module has an uninstall option.

      Regards,

      Shlomi Fish

      ---------------------------------------------------------------------
      Shlomi Fish shlomif@...
      Homepage: http://www.shlomifish.org/

      Knuth is not God! It took him two days to build the Roman Empire.
    • guy keren
      ... i only had the pleasure of programming in java for about half a year, but i can say the following: 1. it is indeed faster to develope working code in java
      Message 44 of 44 , Dec 25, 2004
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        On Fri, 24 Dec 2004, Nadav Har'El wrote:

        > Java, on the other hand, usually fits look a boot to the hand :) I mean,
        > many of its supposed reasons for being used are mere illusions. Java isn't
        > much more portable than other languages, it doesn't really make code easier to
        > reuse (than in other modern languages), and worse of all (and this, in my
        > opinion, is the single thing that makes Java worse than C++) - it too often
        > generates codethat is completely impossible to use, let alone reuse,
        > because of an uncontrollable memory appetite.

        i only had the pleasure of programming in java for about half a year, but
        i can say the following:

        1. it is indeed faster to develope working code in java then in C or C++.
        2. due to the nature of the language (mostly the dynamic class-loading
        eature), it has errupted an open-source environment that did things i
        did not saw done with C or C++. some of these things are now being
        ported back to C and C++. the very fact that the open-source community
        around java developed things that weren't done (or were done not as
        good as) for C/C++, suggests that there is someting to learn from java.

        true, for someone like me, who'se used to having control on the
        environment, it is hard to let go and give java the power - that's why i
        originally ruled out any job offerings that had to do with java. however,
        after the fact, i don't think it was a mistake using java.

        do note that not everyone developes CPU-intensive applications. and in
        those situations, it's easier to get the coding done in java, then in C++.

        and i'm not talking about the scripted languages here - as much as i find
        it even more fun to program with them - i don't want to touch large
        code-bases created with them. and i'll ignore any attempts to argue about
        this point with certain people....

        > Moreover, Java is a very big language, perhaps even bigger than Perl (if you
        > don't use any CPAN stuff), so most people I know cannot program Java on paper,
        > and need a special editor (namely "eclipse") to help them edit. This is what
        > I think Shlomi referred to in his "Hello world" complaint.

        judging a language by 'hello world' is naive. it shows how people tend to
        do all of their "evaluations" of new tools - they try to write something
        trivial, find the tool too complicated for something trivial, and conclude
        its no good.

        by the way, i looked at eclipse and at IntelliJ (a commercial product
        that's quite stronger then eclipse) - and i resorted to coding in Java
        with vi, and compiling the code with the command-line ant interface.
        indeed, i needed to use an html reference in order to work with various
        classes - but the language itself is not more complex then C++ - it's
        the standard library that is very large. you'll have the same problem if
        you work in C++ - for collections you need to remember STL, the same for
        strings, for files you need the standard I/O, for threads you need a
        3rd-party library, and so on. the fact that this is not considered part of
        the language does not mean that the actualy material you need in order to
        write _real_ code, isn't as large as in java. it just _looks_ smaller.

        and i'll admit this - it was quite a relief not to need to use valgrind or
        a similar tool in order to find where all my memory leaks to, or how i
        managed to smear a pointer. it wasn't 100% the case, ofcorse - you can
        still have segmentation faults in java (i saw one such nasty thing, which
        was due to a bug in the java virtual machine implemnentation) - but still
        a relief on day-to-day programming.

        --
        guy

        "For world domination - press 1,
        or dial 0, and please hold, for the creator." -- nob o. dy
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