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Web Navigation on a Remote server and in the hard-disk

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  • Shlomi Fish
    I wrote a script that converted an HTML tree from served-on-the-server mode to browsed on the hard-disk mode. The only change I implemented is for relative
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 17, 2003
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      I wrote a script that converted an HTML tree from served-on-the-server
      mode to browsed on the hard-disk mode. The only change I implemented is
      for relative URLs that end with a slash to have index.html appended to
      them.

      Is it still good enough to enable browsing the tree on the hard disk (it
      seems so).

      Regards,

      Shlomi Fish



      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      Shlomi Fish shlomif@...
      Home Page: http://t2.technion.ac.il/~shlomif/

      An apple a day will keep a doctor away. Two apples a day will keep two
      doctors away.

      Falk Fish
    • Beni Cherniavsky
      ... wget can already do more-or-less that (--convert-links, see ) ... Agh, that s what you mean.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 17, 2003
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        Shlomi Fish wrote on 2003-06-17:

        > I wrote a script that converted an HTML tree from served-on-the-server
        > mode to browsed on the hard-disk mode.

        wget can already do more-or-less that (--convert-links, see
        <http://www.gnu.org/manual/wget/html_node/wget_11.html#SEC11>)

        > The only change I implemented is for relative URLs that end with a
        > slash to have index.html appended to them.
        >
        Agh, that's what you mean. You have access to the server itself and
        you don't mind non-relative links to access the net. But if you
        browse from the server and it's up, why don't you simply browse
        through local HTTP?

        If that's not your situatuation, how do you handle non-relative links?
        Or do you know that all links inside this HTML tree are relative?

        > Is it still good enough to enable browsing the tree on the hard disk (it
        > seems so).
        >
        The ``index.html`` behaivor on directory URLs can be customized in the
        server's config (or by .htaccess), so this is not bullet-proof. But
        if it's your server, you know whether this applies ;-).

        --
        Beni Cherniavsky <cben@...>
        If I don't hack on it, who will? And if I don't GPL it, what am I?
        And why not now?
      • Shlomi Fish
        ... That s not what I have to do. ... I want to create an archive that can be packed into a hard-disk and allow local browsing using a browser, without having
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 17, 2003
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          On Tue, 17 Jun 2003, Beni Cherniavsky wrote:

          > Shlomi Fish wrote on 2003-06-17:
          >
          > > I wrote a script that converted an HTML tree from served-on-the-server
          > > mode to browsed on the hard-disk mode.
          >
          > wget can already do more-or-less that (--convert-links, see
          > <http://www.gnu.org/manual/wget/html_node/wget_11.html#SEC11>)
          >

          That's not what I have to do.

          > > The only change I implemented is for relative URLs that end with a
          > > slash to have index.html appended to them.
          > >
          > Agh, that's what you mean. You have access to the server itself and
          > you don't mind non-relative links to access the net. But if you
          > browse from the server and it's up, why don't you simply browse
          > through local HTTP?
          >
          > If that's not your situatuation, how do you handle non-relative links?
          > Or do you know that all links inside this HTML tree are relative?
          >

          I want to create an archive that can be packed into a hard-disk and allow
          local browsing using a browser, without having to set up a web-server.

          I ignore non-relative links. Let's assume that all links are either
          relative or completely external.

          > > Is it still good enough to enable browsing the tree on the hard disk (it
          > > seems so).
          > >
          > The ``index.html`` behaivor on directory URLs can be customized in the
          > server's config (or by .htaccess), so this is not bullet-proof. But
          > if it's your server, you know whether this applies ;-).
          >

          Let's assume I have a tree that can run on the server, and I want to
          convert it into a tree that will run server-less.

          Regards,

          Shlomi Fish



          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
          Shlomi Fish shlomif@...
          Home Page: http://t2.technion.ac.il/~shlomif/

          An apple a day will keep a doctor away. Two apples a day will keep two
          doctors away.

          Falk Fish
        • Beni Cherniavsky
          ... With these assumptions, it should definitely work. IMHO, it would be more convenient if *browsers* automatically picked up ``index.html`` files on file://
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 18, 2003
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            Shlomi Fish wrote on 2003-06-17:

            > On Tue, 17 Jun 2003, Beni Cherniavsky wrote:
            >
            > > Shlomi Fish wrote on 2003-06-17:
            > >
            > > > I wrote a script that converted an HTML tree from served-on-the-server
            > > > mode to browsed on the hard-disk mode.
            > >
            > > wget can already do more-or-less that (--convert-links, see
            > > <http://www.gnu.org/manual/wget/html_node/wget_11.html#SEC11>)
            > >
            > That's not what I have to do.
            >
            > > > The only change I implemented is for relative URLs that end with a
            > > > slash to have index.html appended to them.
            > > >
            > > Agh, that's what you mean. You have access to the server itself and
            > > you don't mind non-relative links to access the net. But if you
            > > browse from the server and it's up, why don't you simply browse
            > > through local HTTP?
            > >
            > > If that's not your situatuation, how do you handle non-relative links?
            > > Or do you know that all links inside this HTML tree are relative?
            > >
            > I want to create an archive that can be packed into a hard-disk and allow
            > local browsing using a browser, without having to set up a web-server.
            >
            > I ignore non-relative links. Let's assume that all links are either
            > relative or completely external.
            >
            > > > Is it still good enough to enable browsing the tree on the hard disk (it
            > > > seems so).
            > > >
            > > The ``index.html`` behaivor on directory URLs can be customized in the
            > > server's config (or by .htaccess), so this is not bullet-proof. But
            > > if it's your server, you know whether this applies ;-).
            > >
            > Let's assume I have a tree that can run on the server, and I want to
            > convert it into a tree that will run server-less.
            >
            With these assumptions, it should definitely work. IMHO, it would be
            more convenient if *browsers* automatically picked up ``index.html``
            files on file:// links pointing to directiories.

            --
            Beni Cherniavsky <cben@...>
            If I don't hack on it, who will? And if I don't GPL it, what am I?
            And why not now?
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