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Re: [hackers-il] USMC reading list

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  • Orna Agmon
    ... When I was in the army we did not exactly get a reading list, but there were certain books that we were made to feel that if we did not read them, we are
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 12, 2002
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      On Tue, 12 Nov 2002, Muli Ben-Yehuda wrote:

      > As seen on another list:
      >
      > The US Marine Corps reading list:
      > http://www.usmc.mil/cmcalmars.nsf/f9c9e7a1fe55fe42852564280078b406/39da7ce39611249e8525645e00755e1d?OpenDocument
      >
      > Notable notices:
      >
      > - HEINLEIN, STARSHIP TROOPERS (TRAINING)
      >
      > - CARD, ENDER'S GAME (TACTICS)
      >
      > Anyone knows of an equivalnet IDF list?
      >

      When I was in the army we did not exactly get a reading list, but there
      were certain books that we were made to feel that if we did not read them,
      we are rather ignorant.

      Alvin Toffler, the third wave

      TILIM MUNHIM VENESHEK RAKETI, AZRIEL K LORBER

      TZAYADEY HAHELKIKIM , PROF YUVAL NE'EMAN

      Machiavelli: The Prince

      Principles of War, by Carl von Clausewitz

      Blood, Tears and Folly. An Objective Look at World War II. by Len
      Deighton.
      --
      Orna. | http://tx.technion.ac.il/~agmon

      A cat has claws at the end of its paws.
      A sentence has a pause at the end of its clause.
    • Nadav Har'El
      ... This is an ok book, but won t teach anything new to someone with a degree in physics ;) ... Instead of reading this old thing, I would recommend John
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 12, 2002
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        On Tue, Nov 12, 2002, Orna Agmon wrote about "Re: [hackers-il] USMC reading list":
        > TZAYADEY HAHELKIKIM , PROF YUVAL NE'EMAN

        This is an ok book, but won't teach anything new to someone with a
        degree in physics ;)

        > Principles of War, by Carl von Clausewitz

        Instead of reading this old thing, I would recommend John Keegan's "A History
        of Warefare" (writen in 1993, right after the Gulf War).
        It covers the entrire history of warfare, from prehistory and various
        tribes all over the world, through chariots, legions, horses, muskets, and
        so on, to mutual assured distruction, the Gulf War and the U.N. It talks
        about war technology, waring people, soldiers and the history of wars, but
        also discusses the question of why wars have been a part of the human
        experience since prehistory.

        Keegan's basic thesis is that von Clausewitz was wrong: not only is war
        not a continuation of policy with other means (and Keegan gives plenty of
        examples to prove this), but he claims that von Clausewitz-ian thought is
        what caused the militirization of Europe in the 19th century, the idea of
        mandatory army serice for every man (which never existed in earlier
        centuries - soldiers were always a small minority) and brought on "the great
        war" (the first world war). Keegan would argue that von Clausewitz's book
        should never be taught to officers today.

        It is available for only 20 shekels in Zomet Sfarim, by the way.


        --
        Nadav Har'El | Tuesday, Nov 12 2002, 8 Kislev 5763
        nyh@... |-----------------------------------------
        Phone: +972-53-245868, ICQ 13349191 |I considered atheism but there weren't
        http://nadav.harel.org.il |enough holidays.
      • Muli Ben-Yehuda
        ... While we re at it, on my personal list: Sun Tzu s The Art of War, and Musashi s Five Rings. Both available online, but I m too lazy to google. ... Didn t
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 12, 2002
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          On Tue, Nov 12, 2002 at 06:19:49PM +0200, Orna Agmon wrote:

          > Machiavelli: The Prince
          >
          > Principles of War, by Carl von Clausewitz

          While we're at it, on my personal list:

          Sun Tzu's The Art of War, and

          Musashi's Five Rings.

          Both available online, but I'm too lazy to google.

          > Blood, Tears and Folly. An Objective Look at World War II. by Len
          > Deighton.

          Didn't know he wrote non fiction. Interesting.

          --
          Muli Ben-Yehuda http://www.mulix.org/
          mulix@...:~$ sctrace strace /bin/foo http://syscalltrack.sf.net/
          Quis custodes ipsos custodiet? http://www.mulix.org/cv.html
        • Gilad Ben-Yossef
          ... Indeed, that s one of the best books i ever read about the subject, especially once you learn to not take it at surface level . ... I like this one much
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 13, 2002
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            On Wed, 2002-11-13 at 00:23, Muli Ben-Yehuda wrote:

            > Sun Tzu's The Art of War, and

            Indeed, that's one of the best books i ever read about the subject,
            especially once you learn to not take it "at surface level".

            >
            > Musashi's Five Rings.

            I like this one much less for some reason and couldn't connect to it.

            Gilad

            --
            Gilad Ben-Yossef <gilad@...>
            http://benyossef.com
            "Denial really is a river in Eygept."
          • Muli Ben-Yehuda
            ... it. Did you do any martial arts? I read Musashi s Five Rings in one sitting, a few hours before Ninjitsu practice. During the practice, I found myself
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 13, 2002
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              On Wed, Nov 13, 2002 at 11:04:09AM +0200, Gilad Ben-Yossef wrote:

              > > Musashi's Five Rings.
              >
              > I like this one much less for some reason and couldn't connect to
              it.

              Did you do any martial arts?

              I read Musashi's Five Rings in one sitting, a few hours before
              Ninjitsu practice. During the practice, I found myself assessing
              situations and behaving subtly different than I usually did. Perhaps
              it was the book, perhaps cosmic radiation, perhaps some other thing.
              --
              Muli Ben-Yehuda http://www.mulix.org/
              mulix@...:~$ sctrace strace /bin/foo http://syscalltrack.sf.net/
              Quis custodes ipsos custodiet? http://www.mulix.org/cv.html
            • Oleg Goldshmidt
              ... Given that his fiction is very poorly researched (it was so annoying to me that I have not touched his books for years after reading a few titles), I
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 17, 2002
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                Muli Ben-Yehuda <mulix@...> writes:

                > > Blood, Tears and Folly. An Objective Look at World War II. by Len
                > > Deighton.
                >
                > Didn't know he wrote non fiction. Interesting.

                Given that his fiction is very poorly researched (it was so annoying
                to me that I have not touched his books for years after reading a few
                titles), I wonder what his non-fiction looks like.

                I'd like to see what Tom Clancy, or, better yet, Frederick Forsyth
                have to say on the matter.

                --
                Oleg Goldshmidt | ogoldshmidt@...
                ========================================================
                First binary search algorithm - J. Mauchly, 1946
                First correct binary search algorithm - D.H.Lehmer, 1960
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