Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Region of being

Expand Messages
  • u6c2699
    I am not sure this is exactly a habermas region of being, but I was wondering what psychological objections that people have to idea that mind and brain are
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 4, 2003
      I am not sure this is exactly a habermas region of being, but I was
      wondering what psychological objections that people have to idea that
      mind and brain are epistemologically different. I have had people
      say if mind and brain are different then somehow we must believe in
      god, that all neurological research should be abandoned among other
      things, and all sorts of other erroneous conclusions. What thoughts
      does the group have on this sort of anti-philosophy?
    • gedavis1
      I don t think that Habermas work can be very helpful here, though a Habermas scholar could find passages here and there that are relevant (It would be a
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 4, 2003
        I don't think that Habermas' work can be very helpful here, though a Habermas
        scholar could find passages here and there that are relevant (It would be a tedious
        search). This reply is just to let others know that Phil and I are pursuing this off list.

        Gary

        --- In habermas@yahoogroups.com, "u6c2699" <u6c2699@y...> wrote:
        > I am not sure this is exactly a habermas region of being, but I was
        > wondering what psychological objections that people have to idea that
        > mind and brain are epistemologically different. I have had people
        > say if mind and brain are different then somehow we must believe in
        > god, that all neurological research should be abandoned among other
        > things, and all sorts of other erroneous conclusions. What thoughts
        > does the group have on this sort of anti-philosophy?
      • Tom
        I believe Habermas, like Hegel, means by mind something more sophisticated than either a transcendental concept or the mere grey matter sitting in our
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 12, 2003
          I believe Habermas, like Hegel, means by "mind" something more
          sophisticated than either a transcendental concept or the mere grey
          matter sitting in our skulls. This 'continental' way of understanding
          mind (or 'spirit') lies where Americans seem to have most difficulty
          grasping - in social relation 'itself' which is not a material
          'object' but action. In other words, though we must certainly grant
          that the brain 'gives' us some natural developmental impulses, once we
          enter the social stage of human being our 'mind' becomes an
          interactive, interpersonal project, in an absolutely real sense it is
          something that exists 'beyond' or 'outside' the brain. This is what
          lead Hegel to his developmental theory of mind as 'becoming' itself,
          as both self-conscious reflection and transformation of natural being.
          Becoming is the synthesis of positivity (i.e.; natural being) and
          negation (i.e.; transformation). Thus, there will always be an aspect
          of 'mind' that is in fact non-material.

          -tom

          --- In habermas@yahoogroups.com, "u6c2699" <u6c2699@y...> wrote:
          > I am not sure this is exactly a habermas region of being, but I was
          > wondering what psychological objections that people have to idea that
          > mind and brain are epistemologically different. I have had people
          > say if mind and brain are different then somehow we must believe in
          > god, that all neurological research should be abandoned among other
          > things, and all sorts of other erroneous conclusions. What thoughts
          > does the group have on this sort of anti-philosophy?
        • u6c2699
          Casuality and teleology ARE different and will ALWAYS be different. Americans do seem to have an extremely difficult time understanding it. Mind is teleology,
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 27, 2003
            Casuality and teleology ARE different and will ALWAYS be different.
            Americans do seem to have an extremely difficult time understanding
            it. Mind is teleology, brain is casuality. I really have a tough
            time believing how stupid neurological researchers are, they
            certainly get a lot more research funding than philosophers. If I
            have one hope before I die, it is that we do away with the nonsense
            of comte, skinner, the logical positivists and psychologists who have
            infected mankind like a plague.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.