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On real isomorphism between developmental & social-evolutionary processes

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  • Gary Davis
    Theorized isomorphism between developmental and social-evolutionary processes imply that what happens in modernization may be a maturation tying genuine
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2006
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      Theorized isomorphism between developmental and social-evolutionary processes imply that what happens in modernization may be a maturation tying genuine modernity to admirable adulthood---a "mature autonomy" applicable to both, in separate-but-kindred ways, such that facilitating adulthood may facilitate modernization.

      This may apply to Hamas as much as to teaching 13 year-olds, in overtly Habermasian terms---but also in the context of someone teaching early teens (analogizing world leadership with teaching high school? YES).

      "on really bridging personal and social growth"
      http://blog.360.yahoo.com/therebeing?p=84

      Gary



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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Matthew Piscioneri
      Hello Gary, the link to your blog essay is one I can thoroughly recommend to those on the List who haven t clicked yet. To be honest, your dialogue with the
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2006
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        Hello Gary,

        the link to your blog essay is one I can thoroughly recommend to
        those on the List who haven't clicked yet. To be honest, your
        dialogue with the respondent is so rich that it almost excludes
        reasonable comment. A *meisterwerk* no less!

        Of course, tangents are stimulated. The normative justification of
        the teacher's role should also come under critical scrutiny. There
        is such a productive dynamic at work in any classroom, whereby the
        teacher-student-teacher matrix emerges. As far as i am concerned,
        any *teacher* worth his or her salt is also a student of the
        wonderful opportunity to engage with the perspectives of other minds.

        I suppose it is one of the primary hermeneutical relationships that
        is made available...likewise with the parent-child-parent
        relationship. Can the teacher be taught? Can the speaker, listen?
        Can the parent *share* power? Axel Honneth's "ethic of respect"
        springs to mind as a distillation of Habermas' programme. For me,
        Habermas' humanistic credibility stems from the affective basis of
        authentic dialogue. It is a giving and giving that is inevitably a
        receiving and receiving that is inevitably a giving and giving.

        The actual dynamic of social evolution (and probably *biological*
        evolution -- although I don't make any distiction between the two
        except begrudgingly at the level of description) is one of symbiosis.

        Unifying the presently distributed capacities of the global brain
        augurs productive (mind-blowing - in the nicest possible sense!)
        outcomes. Mars by 2025! Who's up for the challenge? The baby-boomers
        have lasted the generational distance...tough stuff IMO. Time to
        reconcile the historical legacy of the Depression and WW2. Maybe
        even time to dream again of the future.

        MattP
      • Matthew Piscioneri
        Dear List, ... A post post thought struck me relative to Gary s discussion of the Great Refusal relative to current ideological tensions between Western
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 8, 2006
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          Dear List,

          I hope the List will indulge me on this whimsy:

          > Unifying the presently distributed capacities of the global brain
          > augurs productive outcomes.

          A "post" post thought struck me relative to Gary's discussion of the
          Great Refusal relative to current ideological tensions between Western
          modernity and some aspects of Islamic culture.

          The question arose: Has a representative of the Muslim world had the
          extraordinary experience of extraterrestial vision?

          In terms of developing a pan-human appreciation of just how incredible
          our planet is and how *we* as people of so many different creeds and
          ethnic backgrounds share this planet *together* [with ALL I'd like to
          think that entails], it seemed important that the privilege of an
          extraterrestial vision also be shared.

          And yes, it has and will be!

          http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,193274,00.html

          [try entering *muslims in space* at answers.com]

          Indeed, next year, a number of Malaysian Muslims (and a Hindu) will
          travel with the Russians to the International Space Station.

          And, in fact, in 1985, a Saudi Arabian was a member of a U.S space
          shuttle flight...the first Muslim in space. Quite incredible.

          Why? Well i think it extends the hermeneutical boundaries of our
          global conversation about *our* futures together. This is why I
          believe the exploration of space is SO important to our futures. It
          could be, perhaps, the origins of the Great Embrace.

          best,

          MattP
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