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Re: [h_t_rex] Race Report, Jay Challenge, July 28

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  • Larry Teeter
    Congratulations Tim!! You picked a tough one for your first 50K; what an adventure! What s next??? Larry tjflynn2003 wrote: Race
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 30, 2007
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      Congratulations Tim!!
      You picked a tough one for your first 50K; what an adventure!
       
      What's next???
       
      Larry

      tjflynn2003 <tjflynn2003@...> wrote:


      Race Report, Jay Mountain Marathon, July 28, Jay, Vermont.

      Ventured up to Vermont for my first 50k last weekend with my Dad and
      Brother in tow. Been working in Boston but hope to see everyone in
      Houston soon.

      This was the race director's last minute update about the course.

      "Once again some adjustment had to be made on the course in order to
      remain off-road and avoid running through the golf course that is
      now completed and operational. . Consequently you will be running
      approximately an extra 15 minutes in the brook before reaching the
      base of Jay Peak (Aid Station # 2). As you will be coming down Jay
      Peak, the lower part of the trail has also been changed by a
      bushwack/Dan special in order to avoid the golf course again. Take
      note that this will NOT bring you back to the base of Jay Peak at
      aid station 4 but in the middle of nowhere

      As I was setting up the Swamp section, the "BEAVER" have completely
      changed the landscape and I was force to re-route the course in
      order to give you a COMPLETE swamp/beaver dam experience.

      With those changes, the ½ marathon should now be 19.5 miles as
      oppose to 18.5 and 33 miles instead of 31.6 for the full Marathon.
      My estimation is that the course is 30 minutes slower this year and
      I will consequently increase the cutoff time to 6.00 hours from 5.30
      at the ½ point or mile 19.5."

      I was quite intimidated by the hype, the sight of the mountain and
      the start line, which lead right up into a steep hill.

      The night before we went to the swimming hole, a perfect 10 ft
      waterfall surrounded by 25 ft rocks, perfect for jumping into the
      cool pool below and a serious upgrade from the pool at the Inn. We
      met a young man, Chris, at the swimming hole who had run the course
      last year. Chris advised me to sprint the first four miles up to
      the ropes section because it gets all backed up and the last thing
      you want to do is have someone's ass in your face as your trying to
      race. Had to ask him what "sprint" means. Oh and he said that is
      was "pretty flat" once you come off the mountain.

      The first four miles were up a bit of logging trail but mostly heavy
      woods with a nice carpet of mulch, a bit of mud and old trees across
      the trail. Chris was right about the ropes section, it was steep,
      the footing was bad the ropes must have been there because the
      backup was so heavy the one slip could cause a domino effect. There
      were plenty of other spots on the course just as steep without
      ropes.

      After the ropes came mud, mud and more mud, ankle deep, knee deep,
      go back and get your shoe deep, which would be a recurring theme.
      Not to worry the first run-in-the brook section was next. Clean
      shoes, wet feet, slippery moss covered ankle twisting rocks and
      boulders everywhere. This was the easy brook section. Everyone had
      to slow down picking through the best route some had more trouble
      than others.

      Race director Dan had advised everyone to send a dry pair of shoes
      out to aid station #2, mile 7 at the base of the mountain so we
      wouldn't have to carry all the mud up with us. Ahh, what a great
      feeling, dry shoes, dry socks, Vaseline for the toes, gummy bears
      and power bars and a wonderful fan with a "Free Hugs" sign, I told
      her after my shower.

      Up the mountain 4,000 ft, sure no problem, feet feel great. It was
      cooler higher up on the mountain and I had some great views of the
      Vermont countryside before the mist moved in and cooled the air
      nicely near the top. On the top half of the mountain I stopped for
      30 seconds every 5 minutes or so to let my heart rate come down. It
      was amazing how much better it felt after just a small rest.

      Aid station #3, top of the mountain, tired but encouraged, felt
      great, time to head down. The path up the mountain was moderated by
      turns and short flat sections followed by steep ascent. The path
      down was steep, covered with slippery wet grass and rocks. I had to
      shuffle step down most of the way and it was actually easier to go
      backwards on some portions of the descent. The bottom of the ski
      area came quickly but the descent down logging trails seemed to go
      on forever and everyone paid the price later.

      Feeling good about getting the mountain out of the way, the tough
      part right, the rest is "pretty flat", I came to the "bushwack". I
      don't know how they cut this path through the underbrush, high grass
      and thick black mud. It was designed so that runners had to look
      for the pink flagging tape with the black polka dots to figure out
      where to go next. I'm sure the lead runners had to do just that but
      fortunately I was right in the middle of the pack and the path was
      somewhat more defined by that time.

      After the bushwack we ran up and down logging roads for an hour or
      so before slipping back into the woods onto a deer trail. Again,
      you could only tell it was a trail because of the flagging tape. It
      went up and down over fallen trees, squeezing between other trees,
      sometimes on a foot deep carpet of forest mulch, sometimes in ankle
      deep mud. Finally the dear train ended and we went into the stream
      again for a few more miles of slippery rock jumping, falling
      sometimes catching myself, sometimes splashing down in the water.

      Coming out of the stream, aid station #5, mile 19, my Dad and
      brother were there to offer encouragement, a life saver at this
      point. Had some boiled red potatoes dipped in salt, gu, bananas,
      oranges, power bar and stuffed a bunch of gummy bears into a plastic
      back in my shorts with the electrolyte capsules. Up to this point
      it hadn't been too hot but the cloud cover lifted a bit and it
      started to warm up. I could really feel the energy shot from the
      food, water and a bit of rest, but the sugar was spiking the energy
      so I cut back on the gu and gummy bears a bit and tried to eat a bit
      more of the protein power bar.

      My brother ran with me for a few minutes, which was a nice boost as
      we crossed into a field of head high grass with a path cut to about
      6 inches. The path ran for a few miles through farms and fields,
      beautiful country, until a river crossing. The river was waist deep
      but so I took the opportunity to defeat gravity for a minute or so
      and cool off, wonderful! Out of the stream an up a long gradual
      hill then down into another section of stream, the most difficult so
      far. About a three-mile stretch up razor sharp most strewn rocks to
      navigate as went back and forth across the fast running stream and
      climbed up and down the rocky banks. At one point we came to a
      large waterfall, had to climb up the bank and back down a man-
      made "staircase" of rocks and back across the lower portion of the
      waterfall. I figured it would be a good opportunity to take a load
      of and get wet so I went down the small waterfall and swam across
      the nice cool pool. The runners behind cheered and started going
      over the falls as everyone else was picking their way across the
      sharp rocks on the other side.

      Finally we came out of the stream and up into the forest right
      around the swimming hole waterfall. Up and down on the dear trail
      we went, then down into a swamp. The swamp had a narrow trail of
      head high grass pushed to the side, blind corners with holes, mud
      and swampy water. The trail went back and forth across the swamp
      until I could see and opening an realized that this was beaver
      territory. The trail crossed up onto the beaver dam, out the other
      side of the swamp, up another steep hill and onto a logging road,
      which lead down to the river crossing.

      The river had a rope across it but it was just as easy, probably
      easier and more refreshing to swim the 30 yards to the other side.
      A ladder lead up the far bank and a group of volunteer firemen were
      sitting there in comfy chairs surrounded by empty water bottles and
      beer bottles? I was praying that this was aid station #6 but the
      said no, the aid station was about a mile up the hill through the
      woods.

      Aid station #6, blueberry hill, fresh blueberrys, "don't eat to
      many", fresh socks and shoes, big blister under big callous on big
      toe. Could have used some coke at this point but someone handed me
      a Pepsi, a Diet Pepsi, no thanks. More bananas, gummy bears, power
      bars and boiled potatoes and another gu and power bar for the road.
      I had been running without a water bottle or camelback to this point
      but it was a long way between aid stations and as luck would have it
      I had place a water bottle in my second drop bag, thank goodness.

      Ahh, mile 24, almost there, what could be next? Started out down
      the hill, finally 200 yards, flat dirt road, turn up into a gravel
      driveway, down to a gully and up a gas line right of way trail cut
      to 6 inches or maybe just pushed down by the four wheeler. I looked
      up and saw runners? Walkers just above going over the rise in a
      fairly step and long incline. Ahh, just getting over the rise,
      what? Walkers, strung out, going up hill for another 2 miles, have
      to be kidding me!

      Ok top of the hill, winding down through 2 miles of logging trail,
      quads are killing me, would rather go backwards. Next River
      crossing, sandy trail, then 30 feet straight up a sand dune. Top of
      the sand dune, oh, it's a sand pit and we have to go down into it
      then 40 feet up the wall on the other side. Out of the sand pit, up
      through the forest again, through a head high cornfield, approaching
      aid station #7 people cheering, better start shuffling my feet
      again.

      My support team has made it to Station #7, great boost, food, etc.
      I walked and talked with John from Maryland through the farm fields
      in a daze for a few miles. Talked about Htrex, John knew Larry
      Teeter from Runners World, also John's first 50ish K. At this point
      I caught a glimpse of Jay Peak off in the distance where I had been,
      oh 6 hours ago. Had a sip of water at 30 miles and headed for the
      last mud pit.

      I ran the last mile or so and a thunder shower broke out just as I
      crossed the finish line 8 hours and 34 minutes after starting. What
      a great adventure! Thanks to the family for support, Dan (I don't
      know how he even marked the course) the race director, the
      volunteers and the free hugs girl who was at every aid station
      cheering the whole day.

      After my show, attempted nap and massage, I caught the last three
      finishers. The last guy from Kentucky came in at exactly 11 hours
      and was thrilled to finish because he had been cut off the last two
      years at the half.

      Loved Vermont, next time I'll get a room at the Inn that isn't over
      the bar with a window to the pool where the band played until 1:00
      am the night of the race.

      http://www.jaychall enge.com/ Html/Jaymountain marathon. htm


    • Miles Klaff
      Great job and entertaining report, Tim! See, all that mud training paid off... Miles ... From: tjflynn2003 To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 31, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Great job and entertaining report, Tim!  See, all that mud training paid off... 

        Miles

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: tjflynn2003 <tjflynn2003@...>
        To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, July 30, 2007 10:04:25 PM
        Subject: [h_t_rex] Race Report, Jay Challenge, July 28



        Race Report, Jay Mountain Marathon, July 28, Jay, Vermont.

        Ventured up to Vermont for my first 50k last weekend with my Dad and
        Brother in tow. Been working in Boston but hope to see everyone in
        Houston soon.

        This was the race director's last minute update about the course.

        "Once again some adjustment had to be made on the course in order to
        remain off-road and avoid running through the golf course that is
        now completed and operational. . Consequently you will be running
        approximately an extra 15 minutes in the brook before reaching the
        base of Jay Peak (Aid Station # 2). As you will be coming down Jay
        Peak, the lower part of the trail has also been changed by a
        bushwack/Dan special in order to avoid the golf course again. Take
        note that this will NOT bring you back to the base of Jay Peak at
        aid station 4 but in the middle of nowhere

        As I was setting up the Swamp section, the "BEAVER" have completely
        changed the landscape and I was force to re-route the course in
        order to give you a COMPLETE swamp/beaver dam experience.

        With those changes, the ½ marathon should now be 19.5 miles as
        oppose to 18.5 and 33 miles instead of 31.6 for the full Marathon.
        My estimation is that the course is 30 minutes slower this year and
        I will consequently increase the cutoff time to 6.00 hours from 5.30
        at the ½ point or mile 19.5."

        I was quite intimidated by the hype, the sight of the mountain and
        the start line, which lead right up into a steep hill.

        The night before we went to the swimming hole, a perfect 10 ft
        waterfall surrounded by 25 ft rocks, perfect for jumping into the
        cool pool below and a serious upgrade from the pool at the Inn. We
        met a young man, Chris, at the swimming hole who had run the course
        last year. Chris advised me to sprint the first four miles up to
        the ropes section because it gets all backed up and the last thing
        you want to do is have someone's ass in your face as your trying to
        race. Had to ask him what "sprint" means. Oh and he said that is
        was "pretty flat" once you come off the mountain.

        The first four miles were up a bit of logging trail but mostly heavy
        woods with a nice carpet of mulch, a bit of mud and old trees across
        the trail. Chris was right about the ropes section, it was steep,
        the footing was bad the ropes must have been there because the
        backup was so heavy the one slip could cause a domino effect. There
        were plenty of other spots on the course just as steep without
        ropes.

        After the ropes came mud, mud and more mud, ankle deep, knee deep,
        go back and get your shoe deep, which would be a recurring theme.
        Not to worry the first run-in-the brook section was next. Clean
        shoes, wet feet, slippery moss covered ankle twisting rocks and
        boulders everywhere. This was the easy brook section. Everyone had
        to slow down picking through the best route some had more trouble
        than others.

        Race director Dan had advised everyone to send a dry pair of shoes
        out to aid station #2, mile 7 at the base of the mountain so we
        wouldn't have to carry all the mud up with us. Ahh, what a great
        feeling, dry shoes, dry socks, Vaseline for the toes, gummy bears
        and power bars and a wonderful fan with a "Free Hugs" sign, I told
        her after my shower.

        Up the mountain 4,000 ft, sure no problem, feet feel great. It was
        cooler higher up on the mountain and I had some great views of the
        Vermont countryside before the mist moved in and cooled the air
        nicely near the top. On the top half of the mountain I stopped for
        30 seconds every 5 minutes or so to let my heart rate come down. It
        was amazing how much better it felt after just a small rest.

        Aid station #3, top of the mountain, tired but encouraged, felt
        great, time to head down. The path up the mountain was moderated by
        turns and short flat sections followed by steep ascent. The path
        down was steep, covered with slippery wet grass and rocks. I had to
        shuffle step down most of the way and it was actually easier to go
        backwards on some portions of the descent. The bottom of the ski
        area came quickly but the descent down logging trails seemed to go
        on forever and everyone paid the price later.

        Feeling good about getting the mountain out of the way, the tough
        part right, the rest is "pretty flat", I came to the "bushwack". I
        don't know how they cut this path through the underbrush, high grass
        and thick black mud. It was designed so that runners had to look
        for the pink flagging tape with the black polka dots to figure out
        where to go next. I'm sure the lead runners had to do just that but
        fortunately I was right in the middle of the pack and the path was
        somewhat more defined by that time.

        After the bushwack we ran up and down logging roads for an hour or
        so before slipping back into the woods onto a deer trail. Again,
        you could only tell it was a trail because of the flagging tape. It
        went up and down over fallen trees, squeezing between other trees,
        sometimes on a foot deep carpet of forest mulch, sometimes in ankle
        deep mud. Finally the dear train ended and we went into the stream
        again for a few more miles of slippery rock jumping, falling
        sometimes catching myself, sometimes splashing down in the water.

        Coming out of the stream, aid station #5, mile 19, my Dad and
        brother were there to offer encouragement, a life saver at this
        point. Had some boiled red potatoes dipped in salt, gu, bananas,
        oranges, power bar and stuffed a bunch of gummy bears into a plastic
        back in my shorts with the electrolyte capsules. Up to this point
        it hadn't been too hot but the cloud cover lifted a bit and it
        started to warm up. I could really feel the energy shot from the
        food, water and a bit of rest, but the sugar was spiking the energy
        so I cut back on the gu and gummy bears a bit and tried to eat a bit
        more of the protein power bar.

        My brother ran with me for a few minutes, which was a nice boost as
        we crossed into a field of head high grass with a path cut to about
        6 inches. The path ran for a few miles through farms and fields,
        beautiful country, until a river crossing. The river was waist deep
        but so I took the opportunity to defeat gravity for a minute or so
        and cool off, wonderful! Out of the stream an up a long gradual
        hill then down into another section of stream, the most difficult so
        far. About a three-mile stretch up razor sharp most strewn rocks to
        navigate as went back and forth across the fast running stream and
        climbed up and down the rocky banks. At one point we came to a
        large waterfall, had to climb up the bank and back down a man-
        made "staircase" of rocks and back across the lower portion of the
        waterfall. I figured it would be a good opportunity to take a load
        of and get wet so I went down the small waterfall and swam across
        the nice cool pool. The runners behind cheered and started going
        over the falls as everyone else was picking their way across the
        sharp rocks on the other side.

        Finally we came out of the stream and up into the forest right
        around the swimming hole waterfall. Up and down on the dear trail
        we went, then down into a swamp. The swamp had a narrow trail of
        head high grass pushed to the side, blind corners with holes, mud
        and swampy water. The trail went back and forth across the swamp
        until I could see and opening an realized that this was beaver
        territory. The trail crossed up onto the beaver dam, out the other
        side of the swamp, up another steep hill and onto a logging road,
        which lead down to the river crossing.

        The river had a rope across it but it was just as easy, probably
        easier and more refreshing to swim the 30 yards to the other side.
        A ladder lead up the far bank and a group of volunteer firemen were
        sitting there in comfy chairs surrounded by empty water bottles and
        beer bottles? I was praying that this was aid station #6 but the
        said no, the aid station was about a mile up the hill through the
        woods.

        Aid station #6, blueberry hill, fresh blueberrys, "don't eat to
        many", fresh socks and shoes, big blister under big callous on big
        toe. Could have used some coke at this point but someone handed me
        a Pepsi, a Diet Pepsi, no thanks. More bananas, gummy bears, power
        bars and boiled potatoes and another gu and power bar for the road.
        I had been running without a water bottle or camelback to this point
        but it was a long way between aid stations and as luck would have it
        I had place a water bottle in my second drop bag, thank goodness.

        Ahh, mile 24, almost there, what could be next? Started out down
        the hill, finally 200 yards, flat dirt road, turn up into a gravel
        driveway, down to a gully and up a gas line right of way trail cut
        to 6 inches or maybe just pushed down by the four wheeler. I looked
        up and saw runners? Walkers just above going over the rise in a
        fairly step and long incline. Ahh, just getting over the rise,
        what? Walkers, strung out, going up hill for another 2 miles, have
        to be kidding me!

        Ok top of the hill, winding down through 2 miles of logging trail,
        quads are killing me, would rather go backwards. Next River
        crossing, sandy trail, then 30 feet straight up a sand dune. Top of
        the sand dune, oh, it's a sand pit and we have to go down into it
        then 40 feet up the wall on the other side. Out of the sand pit, up
        through the forest again, through a head high cornfield, approaching
        aid station #7 people cheering, better start shuffling my feet
        again.

        My support team has made it to Station #7, great boost, food, etc.
        I walked and talked with John from Maryland through the farm fields
        in a daze for a few miles. Talked about Htrex, John knew Larry
        Teeter from Runners World, also John's first 50ish K. At this point
        I caught a glimpse of Jay Peak off in the distance where I had been,
        oh 6 hours ago. Had a sip of water at 30 miles and headed for the
        last mud pit.

        I ran the last mile or so and a thunder shower broke out just as I
        crossed the finish line 8 hours and 34 minutes after starting. What
        a great adventure! Thanks to the family for support, Dan (I don't
        know how he even marked the course) the race director, the
        volunteers and the free hugs girl who was at every aid station
        cheering the whole day.

        After my show, attempted nap and massage, I caught the last three
        finishers. The last guy from Kentucky came in at exactly 11 hours
        and was thrilled to finish because he had been cut off the last two
        years at the half.

        Loved Vermont, next time I'll get a room at the Inn that isn't over
        the bar with a window to the pool where the band played until 1:00
        am the night of the race.

        http://www.jaychall enge.com/ Html/Jaymountain marathon. htm




        Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.
      • Tim Flynn
        Thanks Mack, Still Having a lot of trouble going down stairs but working it out. I m ready to put the next event on the calender, thinking about SunMart.
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 31, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks Mack, 
          Still Having a lot of trouble going down stairs but working it out.  I'm ready to put the next event on the calender, thinking about SunMart.
           
          Regards,
           
          Tim

          Mack Miller <millermack@...> wrote:
          Hey Tim,

          Great report and it sounded like a seriously awesome Adventure run
          as opposed to your ordinary trail ultra.

          Reading your report--I felt like I was in the land of the hobbits!
          Great story! How do the legs feel today? I've never run one that
          fun before--I think I dodged a skunk on my last run...

          Mack

          P.S.--seriously- -you should mail this report to Marathon and Beyond
          magazine--odds are they would publish it!

          --- In h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com, "tjflynn2003" <tjflynn2003@ ...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Race Report, Jay Mountain Marathon, July 28, Jay, Vermont.
          >
          > Ventured up to Vermont for my first 50k last weekend with my Dad
          and
          > Brother in tow. Been working in Boston but hope to see everyone in
          > Houston soon.
          >
          > This was the race director's last minute update about the course.
          >
          > "Once again some adjustment had to be made on the course in order
          to
          > remain off-road and avoid running through the golf course that is
          > now completed and operational. . Consequently you will be running
          > approximately an extra 15 minutes in the brook before reaching the
          > base of Jay Peak (Aid Station # 2). As you will be coming down Jay
          > Peak, the lower part of the trail has also been changed by a
          > bushwack/Dan special in order to avoid the golf course again. Take
          > note that this will NOT bring you back to the base of Jay Peak at
          > aid station 4 but in the middle of nowhere
          >
          > As I was setting up the Swamp section, the "BEAVER" have
          completely
          > changed the landscape and I was force to re-route the course in
          > order to give you a COMPLETE swamp/beaver dam experience.
          >
          > With those changes, the ½ marathon should now be 19.5 miles as
          > oppose to 18.5 and 33 miles instead of 31.6 for the full
          Marathon.
          > My estimation is that the course is 30 minutes slower this year
          and
          > I will consequently increase the cutoff time to 6.00 hours from
          5.30
          > at the ½ point or mile 19.5."
          >
          > I was quite intimidated by the hype, the sight of the mountain and
          > the start line, which lead right up into a steep hill.
          >
          > The night before we went to the swimming hole, a perfect 10 ft
          > waterfall surrounded by 25 ft rocks, perfect for jumping into the
          > cool pool below and a serious upgrade from the pool at the Inn.
          We
          > met a young man, Chris, at the swimming hole who had run the
          course
          > last year. Chris advised me to sprint the first four miles up to
          > the ropes section because it gets all backed up and the last thing
          > you want to do is have someone's ass in your face as your trying
          to
          > race. Had to ask him what "sprint" means. Oh and he said that is
          > was "pretty flat" once you come off the mountain.
          >
          > The first four miles were up a bit of logging trail but mostly
          heavy
          > woods with a nice carpet of mulch, a bit of mud and old trees
          across
          > the trail. Chris was right about the ropes section, it was steep,
          > the footing was bad the ropes must have been there because the
          > backup was so heavy the one slip could cause a domino effect.
          There
          > were plenty of other spots on the course just as steep without
          > ropes.
          >
          > After the ropes came mud, mud and more mud, ankle deep, knee deep,
          > go back and get your shoe deep, which would be a recurring theme.
          > Not to worry the first run-in-the brook section was next. Clean
          > shoes, wet feet, slippery moss covered ankle twisting rocks and
          > boulders everywhere. This was the easy brook section. Everyone
          had
          > to slow down picking through the best route some had more trouble
          > than others.
          >
          > Race director Dan had advised everyone to send a dry pair of shoes
          > out to aid station #2, mile 7 at the base of the mountain so we
          > wouldn't have to carry all the mud up with us. Ahh, what a great
          > feeling, dry shoes, dry socks, Vaseline for the toes, gummy bears
          > and power bars and a wonderful fan with a "Free Hugs" sign, I told
          > her after my shower.
          >
          > Up the mountain 4,000 ft, sure no problem, feet feel great. It
          was
          > cooler higher up on the mountain and I had some great views of the
          > Vermont countryside before the mist moved in and cooled the air
          > nicely near the top. On the top half of the mountain I stopped
          for
          > 30 seconds every 5 minutes or so to let my heart rate come down.
          It
          > was amazing how much better it felt after just a small rest.
          >
          > Aid station #3, top of the mountain, tired but encouraged, felt
          > great, time to head down. The path up the mountain was moderated
          by
          > turns and short flat sections followed by steep ascent. The path
          > down was steep, covered with slippery wet grass and rocks. I had
          to
          > shuffle step down most of the way and it was actually easier to go
          > backwards on some portions of the descent. The bottom of the ski
          > area came quickly but the descent down logging trails seemed to go
          > on forever and everyone paid the price later.
          >
          > Feeling good about getting the mountain out of the way, the tough
          > part right, the rest is "pretty flat", I came to the "bushwack".
          I
          > don't know how they cut this path through the underbrush, high
          grass
          > and thick black mud. It was designed so that runners had to look
          > for the pink flagging tape with the black polka dots to figure out
          > where to go next. I'm sure the lead runners had to do just that
          but
          > fortunately I was right in the middle of the pack and the path was
          > somewhat more defined by that time.
          >
          > After the bushwack we ran up and down logging roads for an hour or
          > so before slipping back into the woods onto a deer trail. Again,
          > you could only tell it was a trail because of the flagging tape.
          It
          > went up and down over fallen trees, squeezing between other trees,
          > sometimes on a foot deep carpet of forest mulch, sometimes in
          ankle
          > deep mud. Finally the dear train ended and we went into the
          stream
          > again for a few more miles of slippery rock jumping, falling
          > sometimes catching myself, sometimes splashing down in the water.
          >
          > Coming out of the stream, aid station #5, mile 19, my Dad and
          > brother were there to offer encouragement, a life saver at this
          > point. Had some boiled red potatoes dipped in salt, gu, bananas,
          > oranges, power bar and stuffed a bunch of gummy bears into a
          plastic
          > back in my shorts with the electrolyte capsules. Up to this point
          > it hadn't been too hot but the cloud cover lifted a bit and it
          > started to warm up. I could really feel the energy shot from the
          > food, water and a bit of rest, but the sugar was spiking the
          energy
          > so I cut back on the gu and gummy bears a bit and tried to eat a
          bit
          > more of the protein power bar.
          >
          > My brother ran with me for a few minutes, which was a nice boost
          as
          > we crossed into a field of head high grass with a path cut to
          about
          > 6 inches. The path ran for a few miles through farms and fields,
          > beautiful country, until a river crossing. The river was waist
          deep
          > but so I took the opportunity to defeat gravity for a minute or so
          > and cool off, wonderful! Out of the stream an up a long gradual
          > hill then down into another section of stream, the most difficult
          so
          > far. About a three-mile stretch up razor sharp most strewn rocks
          to
          > navigate as went back and forth across the fast running stream and
          > climbed up and down the rocky banks. At one point we came to a
          > large waterfall, had to climb up the bank and back down a man-
          > made "staircase" of rocks and back across the lower portion of the
          > waterfall. I figured it would be a good opportunity to take a
          load
          > of and get wet so I went down the small waterfall and swam across
          > the nice cool pool. The runners behind cheered and started going
          > over the falls as everyone else was picking their way across the
          > sharp rocks on the other side.
          >
          > Finally we came out of the stream and up into the forest right
          > around the swimming hole waterfall. Up and down on the dear trail
          > we went, then down into a swamp. The swamp had a narrow trail of
          > head high grass pushed to the side, blind corners with holes, mud
          > and swampy water. The trail went back and forth across the swamp
          > until I could see and opening an realized that this was beaver
          > territory. The trail crossed up onto the beaver dam, out the
          other
          > side of the swamp, up another steep hill and onto a logging road,
          > which lead down to the river crossing.
          >
          > The river had a rope across it but it was just as easy, probably
          > easier and more refreshing to swim the 30 yards to the other
          side.
          > A ladder lead up the far bank and a group of volunteer firemen
          were
          > sitting there in comfy chairs surrounded by empty water bottles
          and
          > beer bottles? I was praying that this was aid station #6 but the
          > said no, the aid station was about a mile up the hill through the
          > woods.
          >
          > Aid station #6, blueberry hill, fresh blueberrys, "don't eat to
          > many", fresh socks and shoes, big blister under big callous on big
          > toe. Could have used some coke at this point but someone handed
          me
          > a Pepsi, a Diet Pepsi, no thanks. More bananas, gummy bears,
          power
          > bars and boiled potatoes and another gu and power bar for the
          road.
          > I had been running without a water bottle or camelback to this
          point
          > but it was a long way between aid stations and as luck would have
          it
          > I had place a water bottle in my second drop bag, thank goodness.
          >
          > Ahh, mile 24, almost there, what could be next? Started out down
          > the hill, finally 200 yards, flat dirt road, turn up into a gravel
          > driveway, down to a gully and up a gas line right of way trail cut
          > to 6 inches or maybe just pushed down by the four wheeler. I
          looked
          > up and saw runners? Walkers just above going over the rise in a
          > fairly step and long incline. Ahh, just getting over the rise,
          > what? Walkers, strung out, going up hill for another 2 miles,
          have
          > to be kidding me!
          >
          > Ok top of the hill, winding down through 2 miles of logging trail,
          > quads are killing me, would rather go backwards. Next River
          > crossing, sandy trail, then 30 feet straight up a sand dune. Top
          of
          > the sand dune, oh, it's a sand pit and we have to go down into it
          > then 40 feet up the wall on the other side. Out of the sand pit,
          up
          > through the forest again, through a head high cornfield,
          approaching
          > aid station #7 people cheering, better start shuffling my feet
          > again.
          >
          > My support team has made it to Station #7, great boost, food,
          etc.
          > I walked and talked with John from Maryland through the farm
          fields
          > in a daze for a few miles. Talked about Htrex, John knew Larry
          > Teeter from Runners World, also John's first 50ish K. At this
          point
          > I caught a glimpse of Jay Peak off in the distance where I had
          been,
          > oh 6 hours ago. Had a sip of water at 30 miles and headed for the
          > last mud pit.
          >
          > I ran the last mile or so and a thunder shower broke out just as I
          > crossed the finish line 8 hours and 34 minutes after starting.
          What
          > a great adventure! Thanks to the family for support, Dan (I don't
          > know how he even marked the course) the race director, the
          > volunteers and the free hugs girl who was at every aid station
          > cheering the whole day.
          >
          > After my show, attempted nap and massage, I caught the last three
          > finishers. The last guy from Kentucky came in at exactly 11 hours
          > and was thrilled to finish because he had been cut off the last
          two
          > years at the half.
          >
          > Loved Vermont, next time I'll get a room at the Inn that isn't
          over
          > the bar with a window to the pool where the band played until 1:00
          > am the night of the race.
          >
          >
          > http://www.jaychall enge.com/ Html/Jaymountain marathon. htm
          >


        • Tim Flynn
          Thanks Larry, definitely need to get something on the calender soon. SunMart for sure but need something in between. Larry Teeter wrote:
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Larry, definitely need to get something on the calender soon.  SunMart for sure but need something in between.

            Larry Teeter <larathon@...> wrote:
            Congratulations Tim!!
            You picked a tough one for your first 50K; what an adventure!
             
            What's next???
             
            Larry

            tjflynn2003 <tjflynn2003@ yahoo.com> wrote:


            Race Report, Jay Mountain Marathon, July 28, Jay, Vermont.

            Ventured up to Vermont for my first 50k last weekend with my Dad and
            Brother in tow. Been working in Boston but hope to see everyone in
            Houston soon.

            This was the race director's last minute update about the course.

            "Once again some adjustment had to be made on the course in order to
            remain off-road and avoid running through the golf course that is
            now completed and operational. . Consequently you will be running
            approximately an extra 15 minutes in the brook before reaching the
            base of Jay Peak (Aid Station # 2). As you will be coming down Jay
            Peak, the lower part of the trail has also been changed by a
            bushwack/Dan special in order to avoid the golf course again. Take
            note that this will NOT bring you back to the base of Jay Peak at
            aid station 4 but in the middle of nowhere

            As I was setting up the Swamp section, the "BEAVER" have completely
            changed the landscape and I was force to re-route the course in
            order to give you a COMPLETE swamp/beaver dam experience.

            With those changes, the ½ marathon should now be 19.5 miles as
            oppose to 18.5 and 33 miles instead of 31.6 for the full Marathon.
            My estimation is that the course is 30 minutes slower this year and
            I will consequently increase the cutoff time to 6.00 hours from 5.30
            at the ½ point or mile 19.5."

            I was quite intimidated by the hype, the sight of the mountain and
            the start line, which lead right up into a steep hill.

            The night before we went to the swimming hole, a perfect 10 ft
            waterfall surrounded by 25 ft rocks, perfect for jumping into the
            cool pool below and a serious upgrade from the pool at the Inn. We
            met a young man, Chris, at the swimming hole who had run the course
            last year. Chris advised me to sprint the first four miles up to
            the ropes section because it gets all backed up and the last thing
            you want to do is have someone's ass in your face as your trying to
            race. Had to ask him what "sprint" means. Oh and he said that is
            was "pretty flat" once you come off the mountain.

            The first four miles were up a bit of logging trail but mostly heavy
            woods with a nice carpet of mulch, a bit of mud and old trees across
            the trail. Chris was right about the ropes section, it was steep,
            the footing was bad the ropes must have been there because the
            backup was so heavy the one slip could cause a domino effect. There
            were plenty of other spots on the course just as steep without
            ropes.

            After the ropes came mud, mud and more mud, ankle deep, knee deep,
            go back and get your shoe deep, which would be a recurring theme.
            Not to worry the first run-in-the brook section was next. Clean
            shoes, wet feet, slippery moss covered ankle twisting rocks and
            boulders everywhere. This was the easy brook section. Everyone had
            to slow down picking through the best route some had more trouble
            than others.

            Race director Dan had advised everyone to send a dry pair of shoes
            out to aid station #2, mile 7 at the base of the mountain so we
            wouldn't have to carry all the mud up with us. Ahh, what a great
            feeling, dry shoes, dry socks, Vaseline for the toes, gummy bears
            and power bars and a wonderful fan with a "Free Hugs" sign, I told
            her after my shower.

            Up the mountain 4,000 ft, sure no problem, feet feel great. It was
            cooler higher up on the mountain and I had some great views of the
            Vermont countryside before the mist moved in and cooled the air
            nicely near the top. On the top half of the mountain I stopped for
            30 seconds every 5 minutes or so to let my heart rate come down. It
            was amazing how much better it felt after just a small rest.

            Aid station #3, top of the mountain, tired but encouraged, felt
            great, time to head down. The path up the mountain was moderated by
            turns and short flat sections followed by steep ascent. The path
            down was steep, covered with slippery wet grass and rocks. I had to
            shuffle step down most of the way and it was actually easier to go
            backwards on some portions of the descent. The bottom of the ski
            area came quickly but the descent down logging trails seemed to go
            on forever and everyone paid the price later.

            Feeling good about getting the mountain out of the way, the tough
            part right, the rest is "pretty flat", I came to the "bushwack". I
            don't know how they cut this path through the underbrush, high grass
            and thick black mud. It was designed so that runners had to look
            for the pink flagging tape with the black polka dots to figure out
            where to go next. I'm sure the lead runners had to do just that but
            fortunately I was right in the middle of the pack and the path was
            somewhat more defined by that time.

            After the bushwack we ran up and down logging roads for an hour or
            so before slipping back into the woods onto a deer trail. Again,
            you could only tell it was a trail because of the flagging tape. It
            went up and down over fallen trees, squeezing between other trees,
            sometimes on a foot deep carpet of forest mulch, sometimes in ankle
            deep mud. Finally the dear train ended and we went into the stream
            again for a few more miles of slippery rock jumping, falling
            sometimes catching myself, sometimes splashing down in the water.

            Coming out of the stream, aid station #5, mile 19, my Dad and
            brother were there to offer encouragement, a life saver at this
            point. Had some boiled red potatoes dipped in salt, gu, bananas,
            oranges, power bar and stuffed a bunch of gummy bears into a plastic
            back in my shorts with the electrolyte capsules. Up to this point
            it hadn't been too hot but the cloud cover lifted a bit and it
            started to warm up. I could really feel the energy shot from the
            food, water and a bit of rest, but the sugar was spiking the energy
            so I cut back on the gu and gummy bears a bit and tried to eat a bit
            more of the protein power bar.

            My brother ran with me for a few minutes, which was a nice boost as
            we crossed into a field of head high grass with a path cut to about
            6 inches. The path ran for a few miles through farms and fields,
            beautiful country, until a river crossing. The river was waist deep
            but so I took the opportunity to defeat gravity for a minute or so
            and cool off, wonderful! Out of the stream an up a long gradual
            hill then down into another section of stream, the most difficult so
            far. About a three-mile stretch up razor sharp most strewn rocks to
            navigate as went back and forth across the fast running stream and
            climbed up and down the rocky banks. At one point we came to a
            large waterfall, had to climb up the bank and back down a man-
            made "staircase" of rocks and back across the lower portion of the
            waterfall. I figured it would be a good opportunity to take a load
            of and get wet so I went down the small waterfall and swam across
            the nice cool pool. The runners behind cheered and started going
            over the falls as everyone else was picking their way across the
            sharp rocks on the other side.

            Finally we came out of the stream and up into the forest right
            around the swimming hole waterfall. Up and down on the dear trail
            we went, then down into a swamp. The swamp had a narrow trail of
            head high grass pushed to the side, blind corners with holes, mud
            and swampy water. The trail went back and forth across the swamp
            until I could see and opening an realized that this was beaver
            territory. The trail crossed up onto the beaver dam, out the other
            side of the swamp, up another steep hill and onto a logging road,
            which lead down to the river crossing.

            The river had a rope across it but it was just as easy, probably
            easier and more refreshing to swim the 30 yards to the other side.
            A ladder lead up the far bank and a group of volunteer firemen were
            sitting there in comfy chairs surrounded by empty water bottles and
            beer bottles? I was praying that this was aid station #6 but the
            said no, the aid station was about a mile up the hill through the
            woods.

            Aid station #6, blueberry hill, fresh blueberrys, "don't eat to
            many", fresh socks and shoes, big blister under big callous on big
            toe. Could have used some coke at this point but someone handed me
            a Pepsi, a Diet Pepsi, no thanks. More bananas, gummy bears, power
            bars and boiled potatoes and another gu and power bar for the road.
            I had been running without a water bottle or camelback to this point
            but it was a long way between aid stations and as luck would have it
            I had place a water bottle in my second drop bag, thank goodness.

            Ahh, mile 24, almost there, what could be next? Started out down
            the hill, finally 200 yards, flat dirt road, turn up into a gravel
            driveway, down to a gully and up a gas line right of way trail cut
            to 6 inches or maybe just pushed down by the four wheeler. I looked
            up and saw runners? Walkers just above going over the rise in a
            fairly step and long incline. Ahh, just getting over the rise,
            what? Walkers, strung out, going up hill for another 2 miles, have
            to be kidding me!

            Ok top of the hill, winding down through 2 miles of logging trail,
            quads are killing me, would rather go backwards. Next River
            crossing, sandy trail, then 30 feet straight up a sand dune. Top of
            the sand dune, oh, it's a sand pit and we have to go down into it
            then 40 feet up the wall on the other side. Out of the sand pit, up
            through the forest again, through a head high cornfield, approaching
            aid station #7 people cheering, better start shuffling my feet
            again.

            My support team has made it to Station #7, great boost, food, etc.
            I walked and talked with John from Maryland through the farm fields
            in a daze for a few miles. Talked about Htrex, John knew Larry
            Teeter from Runners World, also John's first 50ish K. At this point
            I caught a glimpse of Jay Peak off in the distance where I had been,
            oh 6 hours ago. Had a sip of water at 30 miles and headed for the
            last mud pit.

            I ran the last mile or so and a thunder shower broke out just as I
            crossed the finish line 8 hours and 34 minutes after starting. What
            a great adventure! Thanks to the family for support, Dan (I don't
            know how he even marked the course) the race director, the
            volunteers and the free hugs girl who was at every aid station
            cheering the whole day.

            After my show, attempted nap and massage, I caught the last three
            finishers. The last guy from Kentucky came in at exactly 11 hours
            and was thrilled to finish because he had been cut off the last two
            years at the half.

            Loved Vermont, next time I'll get a room at the Inn that isn't over
            the bar with a window to the pool where the band played until 1:00
            am the night of the race.

            http://www.jaychall enge.com/ Html/Jaymountain marathon. htm



          • Larry Teeter
            Congratulations Tim!! You picked a tough one for your first 50K; what an adventure! What s next??? Larry tjflynn2003 wrote: Race
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Congratulations Tim!!
              You picked a tough one for your first 50K; what an adventure!
               
              What's next???
               
              Larry

              tjflynn2003 <tjflynn2003@...> wrote:


              Race Report, Jay Mountain Marathon, July 28, Jay, Vermont.

              Ventured up to Vermont for my first 50k last weekend with my Dad and
              Brother in tow. Been working in Boston but hope to see everyone in
              Houston soon.

              This was the race director's last minute update about the course.

              "Once again some adjustment had to be made on the course in order to
              remain off-road and avoid running through the golf course that is
              now completed and operational. . Consequently you will be running
              approximately an extra 15 minutes in the brook before reaching the
              base of Jay Peak (Aid Station # 2). As you will be coming down Jay
              Peak, the lower part of the trail has also been changed by a
              bushwack/Dan special in order to avoid the golf course again. Take
              note that this will NOT bring you back to the base of Jay Peak at
              aid station 4 but in the middle of nowhere

              As I was setting up the Swamp section, the "BEAVER" have completely
              changed the landscape and I was force to re-route the course in
              order to give you a COMPLETE swamp/beaver dam experience.

              With those changes, the ½ marathon should now be 19.5 miles as
              oppose to 18.5 and 33 miles instead of 31.6 for the full Marathon.
              My estimation is that the course is 30 minutes slower this year and
              I will consequently increase the cutoff time to 6.00 hours from 5.30
              at the ½ point or mile 19.5."

              I was quite intimidated by the hype, the sight of the mountain and
              the start line, which lead right up into a steep hill.

              The night before we went to the swimming hole, a perfect 10 ft
              waterfall surrounded by 25 ft rocks, perfect for jumping into the
              cool pool below and a serious upgrade from the pool at the Inn. We
              met a young man, Chris, at the swimming hole who had run the course
              last year. Chris advised me to sprint the first four miles up to
              the ropes section because it gets all backed up and the last thing
              you want to do is have someone's ass in your face as your trying to
              race. Had to ask him what "sprint" means. Oh and he said that is
              was "pretty flat" once you come off the mountain.

              The first four miles were up a bit of logging trail but mostly heavy
              woods with a nice carpet of mulch, a bit of mud and old trees across
              the trail. Chris was right about the ropes section, it was steep,
              the footing was bad the ropes must have been there because the
              backup was so heavy the one slip could cause a domino effect. There
              were plenty of other spots on the course just as steep without
              ropes.

              After the ropes came mud, mud and more mud, ankle deep, knee deep,
              go back and get your shoe deep, which would be a recurring theme.
              Not to worry the first run-in-the brook section was next. Clean
              shoes, wet feet, slippery moss covered ankle twisting rocks and
              boulders everywhere. This was the easy brook section. Everyone had
              to slow down picking through the best route some had more trouble
              than others.

              Race director Dan had advised everyone to send a dry pair of shoes
              out to aid station #2, mile 7 at the base of the mountain so we
              wouldn't have to carry all the mud up with us. Ahh, what a great
              feeling, dry shoes, dry socks, Vaseline for the toes, gummy bears
              and power bars and a wonderful fan with a "Free Hugs" sign, I told
              her after my shower.

              Up the mountain 4,000 ft, sure no problem, feet feel great. It was
              cooler higher up on the mountain and I had some great views of the
              Vermont countryside before the mist moved in and cooled the air
              nicely near the top. On the top half of the mountain I stopped for
              30 seconds every 5 minutes or so to let my heart rate come down. It
              was amazing how much better it felt after just a small rest.

              Aid station #3, top of the mountain, tired but encouraged, felt
              great, time to head down. The path up the mountain was moderated by
              turns and short flat sections followed by steep ascent. The path
              down was steep, covered with slippery wet grass and rocks. I had to
              shuffle step down most of the way and it was actually easier to go
              backwards on some portions of the descent. The bottom of the ski
              area came quickly but the descent down logging trails seemed to go
              on forever and everyone paid the price later.

              Feeling good about getting the mountain out of the way, the tough
              part right, the rest is "pretty flat", I came to the "bushwack". I
              don't know how they cut this path through the underbrush, high grass
              and thick black mud. It was designed so that runners had to look
              for the pink flagging tape with the black polka dots to figure out
              where to go next. I'm sure the lead runners had to do just that but
              fortunately I was right in the middle of the pack and the path was
              somewhat more defined by that time.

              After the bushwack we ran up and down logging roads for an hour or
              so before slipping back into the woods onto a deer trail. Again,
              you could only tell it was a trail because of the flagging tape. It
              went up and down over fallen trees, squeezing between other trees,
              sometimes on a foot deep carpet of forest mulch, sometimes in ankle
              deep mud. Finally the dear train ended and we went into the stream
              again for a few more miles of slippery rock jumping, falling
              sometimes catching myself, sometimes splashing down in the water.

              Coming out of the stream, aid station #5, mile 19, my Dad and
              brother were there to offer encouragement, a life saver at this
              point. Had some boiled red potatoes dipped in salt, gu, bananas,
              oranges, power bar and stuffed a bunch of gummy bears into a plastic
              back in my shorts with the electrolyte capsules. Up to this point
              it hadn't been too hot but the cloud cover lifted a bit and it
              started to warm up. I could really feel the energy shot from the
              food, water and a bit of rest, but the sugar was spiking the energy
              so I cut back on the gu and gummy bears a bit and tried to eat a bit
              more of the protein power bar.

              My brother ran with me for a few minutes, which was a nice boost as
              we crossed into a field of head high grass with a path cut to about
              6 inches. The path ran for a few miles through farms and fields,
              beautiful country, until a river crossing. The river was waist deep
              but so I took the opportunity to defeat gravity for a minute or so
              and cool off, wonderful! Out of the stream an up a long gradual
              hill then down into another section of stream, the most difficult so
              far. About a three-mile stretch up razor sharp most strewn rocks to
              navigate as went back and forth across the fast running stream and
              climbed up and down the rocky banks. At one point we came to a
              large waterfall, had to climb up the bank and back down a man-
              made "staircase" of rocks and back across the lower portion of the
              waterfall. I figured it would be a good opportunity to take a load
              of and get wet so I went down the small waterfall and swam across
              the nice cool pool. The runners behind cheered and started going
              over the falls as everyone else was picking their way across the
              sharp rocks on the other side.

              Finally we came out of the stream and up into the forest right
              around the swimming hole waterfall. Up and down on the dear trail
              we went, then down into a swamp. The swamp had a narrow trail of
              head high grass pushed to the side, blind corners with holes, mud
              and swampy water. The trail went back and forth across the swamp
              until I could see and opening an realized that this was beaver
              territory. The trail crossed up onto the beaver dam, out the other
              side of the swamp, up another steep hill and onto a logging road,
              which lead down to the river crossing.

              The river had a rope across it but it was just as easy, probably
              easier and more refreshing to swim the 30 yards to the other side.
              A ladder lead up the far bank and a group of volunteer firemen were
              sitting there in comfy chairs surrounded by empty water bottles and
              beer bottles? I was praying that this was aid station #6 but the
              said no, the aid station was about a mile up the hill through the
              woods.

              Aid station #6, blueberry hill, fresh blueberrys, "don't eat to
              many", fresh socks and shoes, big blister under big callous on big
              toe. Could have used some coke at this point but someone handed me
              a Pepsi, a Diet Pepsi, no thanks. More bananas, gummy bears, power
              bars and boiled potatoes and another gu and power bar for the road.
              I had been running without a water bottle or camelback to this point
              but it was a long way between aid stations and as luck would have it
              I had place a water bottle in my second drop bag, thank goodness.

              Ahh, mile 24, almost there, what could be next? Started out down
              the hill, finally 200 yards, flat dirt road, turn up into a gravel
              driveway, down to a gully and up a gas line right of way trail cut
              to 6 inches or maybe just pushed down by the four wheeler. I looked
              up and saw runners? Walkers just above going over the rise in a
              fairly step and long incline. Ahh, just getting over the rise,
              what? Walkers, strung out, going up hill for another 2 miles, have
              to be kidding me!

              Ok top of the hill, winding down through 2 miles of logging trail,
              quads are killing me, would rather go backwards. Next River
              crossing, sandy trail, then 30 feet straight up a sand dune. Top of
              the sand dune, oh, it's a sand pit and we have to go down into it
              then 40 feet up the wall on the other side. Out of the sand pit, up
              through the forest again, through a head high cornfield, approaching
              aid station #7 people cheering, better start shuffling my feet
              again.

              My support team has made it to Station #7, great boost, food, etc.
              I walked and talked with John from Maryland through the farm fields
              in a daze for a few miles. Talked about Htrex, John knew Larry
              Teeter from Runners World, also John's first 50ish K. At this point
              I caught a glimpse of Jay Peak off in the distance where I had been,
              oh 6 hours ago. Had a sip of water at 30 miles and headed for the
              last mud pit.

              I ran the last mile or so and a thunder shower broke out just as I
              crossed the finish line 8 hours and 34 minutes after starting. What
              a great adventure! Thanks to the family for support, Dan (I don't
              know how he even marked the course) the race director, the
              volunteers and the free hugs girl who was at every aid station
              cheering the whole day.

              After my show, attempted nap and massage, I caught the last three
              finishers. The last guy from Kentucky came in at exactly 11 hours
              and was thrilled to finish because he had been cut off the last two
              years at the half.

              Loved Vermont, next time I'll get a room at the Inn that isn't over
              the bar with a window to the pool where the band played until 1:00
              am the night of the race.

              http://www.jaychall enge.com/ Html/Jaymountain marathon. htm



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