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Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report

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  • Christopher Kapraun
    Whoa...and I thought I had a low coffee moment. I am definitely not weening off caffeine...it s just better for everyone around me.   The last time I was at
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
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      Whoa...and I thought I had a low coffee moment.
      I am definitely not weening off caffeine...it's just better for everyone around me.
       
      The last time I was at Bandera I was pacing Richard L. in '06.
       
      Congrats Adam.
       
       
      ...ChrisK


      From: lynnor matheney <lillamb1997@...>
      To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, January 20, 2010 12:38:27 PM
      Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report

       



      Oh derr,, Adam,, I don't know why I said Chris..congrats on your finish Adam..oh I see, it was Chris who asked for race reports. I am weening off caffeine, withdrawal always turns me into a blithering idiot, sorry.

      Don't worry Miles I'll be focused at the aid station, I promise!

      the lost Lynnor, forever more

    • Jay Alvarez
       Great report and excellent job on your race. I believe somewhere about mile 19 I met up with your wife. We exchanged hellos and discussed the course and
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
         Great report and excellent job on your race. I believe somewhere about mile 19 I met up with your wife. We exchanged hellos and discussed the course and where we were from. I thought it was funny that one of the few people I talked to was from Houston also. Definetly a tough girl, she continued the to finish race injured well ahead of me. Tell her great job as well!
         
        Jay



        From: lynnor matheney <lillamb1997@...>
        Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
        To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 12:30 PM

         

        Way to go Chris. I heard about Sarah's fall too. I don't think I ever saw her though. I hope her nose healed okay? (I don't think we've met, but I heard about her poor nose quite a few times and that she kept going) And don't kick yourself too much, lol, my husband wouldn't notice a big honking bandage on my nose either, but if other body parts change, he definitely notices!!!
         
        Our cabin didn't have any running water the first night. There was 8 in our party and those who did 25 or 50 km's were able to get hot showers that afternoon/evening but by the time our 100 k runner arrived, there was no hot water. We did have heat ..
         
        I wrenched my ankle pretty good about 5 miles in, something I never do..that was a race that won't be forgotten. I stopped after 50 km's, I have asthma, not sure if it is exercise induced, cold air induced or both, but I was wheezing quite a bit. Oh well. Still, a blast.
         
        Maybe see you guys at RR? I'll be at the T rex aid station 6-noon that Sun, if you come through, say hi!!
         
        Lynnor Matheney

      • Jay Alvarez
        Hey Bob,   I experienced something similar in regard to fluid in the lungs. For several days after the race I would weeze any time I would breathe in deep or
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Hey Bob,
           
          I experienced something similar in regard to fluid in the lungs. For several days after the race I would weeze any time I would breathe in deep or if I went out for a run. Finally all is good and seem to be back to normal again.
           
          Jay

          --- On Wed, 1/20/10, bob.i.botto@... <bob.i.botto@...> wrote:

          From: bob.i.botto@... <bob.i.botto@...>
          Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report [2 Attachments]
          To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 1:19 PM

           


          Great story!!! Congratulations. I experienced what I believe is a type of
          pneumonia this past week - several days after finishing Bandera 50k. On
          Sunday night I tried to run and could not even jog (10-12 minute pace) for
          0.1 miles. I could not get any oxygen to my legs. It was scarey. Now I am
          fine and ran 6 miles in 53 minutes yesterday. Anybody else? I'm wondering
          if the cold dry air caused a temporary lung irritation filling them up with
          fluids and cutting off my air.

          Bob

          Bob Botto
          Analytical Services Laboratory
          Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
          5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
          Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
          Phone: 281-834-5133
          Pager: 281-439-1300
          Fax: 281-834-1775
          Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




          Houston T-REX
          Training Group
          <h_t_rex@yahoo To
          .com> h_t_rex YahooGroup
          Sent by: <h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com>
          h_t_rex@yahoog cc
          roups.com
          Subject
          [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
          01/20/10 12:11
          PM


          Please respond
          to
          h_t_rex@yahoog
          roups.com














          Sorry for the late reply on Bandera, but here's my longggg Race
          report from Bandera. I apologize in advance for the length.

          Last weekend Sarah and I, along with two of our running friends
          (Chauncey and Dino) headed out to Bandera, TX for the Bandera
          25k/50k/100k ultra trail run. The town of Bandera prides itself as
          the "Cowboy Capital of the World" and is located about an hour west
          of San Antonio in the Texas hill country. The Bandera ultra trail
          run is advertised as "A trail run of rugged and brutal beauty where
          everything cuts, stings and bites.' It's also considered one of the
          toughest trail races in the state. My goal was simply to finish my
          first 100k trail race (yes, that's about 62 miles) within the
          allotted time, but in the end I gained a lot more than I expected.

          Friday afternoon the four of us arrived at the Silver Sage Corral in
          the town of Bandera to pick up our race packets, listen to the trail
          briefing and enjoy the pre-race dinner. The race started the next
          day at 7:30am, so this was a good chance to mingle with other ultra
          runners, exchange stories and discuss strategies for the next day's
          run. One topic that seemed to be common was the 11 degree
          temperature predicted for the race start. That's a lot better than
          the 100+ degree weather that Bandera gets during the summer, but
          most of people here that hadn't experienced temperatures this cold.
          We decided that gloves and long running pants would work well for us
          for at least the first few hours. The conversations were great and
          the majority of people were pretty laid back. Most of all, we were
          a group of people simply looking forward to another great day in the
          outdoors on a scenic course.

          After dinner we headed to our hotel only to find that our hotel
          lacked both heat and hot water. The hotel staff was very
          accommodating given the circumstances, and gave us the option of
          staying at another hotel 30 miles away or providing us with two
          space heaters and a few extra blankets. Given the extra distance
          and time that it would take to get to the start of the race we
          decided to take the blankets and suck it up for the night.

          The race morning came way too soon, and the temperature was around
          15 degrees as expected. Hundreds of shivering runners huddled
          around each of the three race starts awaiting the official start.
          Each of the race distances actually started at different places on
          the course so this was the last that I saw of Sarah, Dino and
          Chauncey until after they finished their respective races.

          At 7:30am the races began and I tried not to think about covering 62
          miles before the end of the day. My plan was to focus on one aid
          station at a time, and only think of how many aid stations were left
          instead of how many miles I had to run. `One aid station down,
          eleven to go', just sounded so much better than 56 miles to the
          finish.

          The first 10 miles went by in a flash and it was odd how quickly I
          needed to shed my gloves and unzip my sweatshirt, while at the same
          time my water bottle bite valve continued to ice over every few
          minutes. A little while later I heard music blaring from the next
          aide station and as I rolled in volunteers flocked to see what I
          needed… refill your water bottle, grilled cheese sandwich, candy?
          The volunteers at each of the aid stations were really awesome and
          made sure that each runner got what they needed before heading out
          to the next aid station. I decided to start eating real food (half
          of a grilled cheese sandwich in this case) and planned to continue
          eating real food every 5-6 miles for the rest of the day. This
          worked really well for me and as a result I was able to keep up my
          energy for most of the day.

          At the same time that I was leaving my third aid station, Sarah had
          just slipped on Bandera's rugged and unforgiving course, where she
          broke her nose and picked up a few additional scrapes and bruises.
          After a few moments she simply brushed herself off and continued
          running the remaining 20+ miles to finish her 3rd 50km trail race.
          She's a pretty tough girl and I'm glad that she's my wife! I didn't
          find out that she fell until well into my second lap, but I did
          wonder how everyone was doing as the morning went on. After
          crossing the 25k mark I also thought how Chauncey would soon be
          finishing his 25k race.

          For the remainder of the morning I ran with a few small groups of
          people as the runners quickly thinned out. Trail runners are great
          for conversing on the trail and I was able to share stories of
          running Mt. Si and Tiger Mountain, WA with someone who traveled from
          Seattle, WA, and about Michigan's Toyota Great Lakes Relay with
          someone from Detroit. Before I knew it, I had come to the halfway
          point and I was way ahead of schedule. I planned on doing my first
          50k in around 7hrs, but came in under 6hrs. Seeing that I had time
          to spare, I decided to relax change socks and shirts and grab some
          food before tackling the next 50k. And boy did that feel great! I
          knew that the run was far from over and wanted to make sure I was
          ready for whatever it had in store for me. About 5 minutes later I
          rolled out of the aid station and hoped I could stay injury free and
          finish the last 50k before midnight. The race cutoff was actually
          7:30am, but I wanted to finish somewhere between 10 and 11pm.

          A little while later I thought of Dino and Sarah as they were
          finishing their 50k and heading back to the hotel to see if we had
          any hot water. Later I would find out that our hotel still didn't
          have hot water, but they were all able to use another room that did
          have hot water. It's amazing how you start to appreciate the simple
          things when you don't have them.

          Finally nightfall arrived and the temperature began to retreat from
          the mid 40s back into the 30s. I was still slightly ahead of
          schedule, but knew that the remaining 15+ miles that I had to
          complete would be tough. By now the heard had thinned out
          sufficiently such that it was normal to spend up to 30 minutes on
          the trail without seeing anyone. Night also made navigating rocks
          and hills more difficult. Without someone to follow, there were
          several times that I wasn't sure if I was still on the right trail.
          Thank goodness I didn't get lost in the middle of nowhere at night,
          especially when I was starting to get cold!

          As I came into the Cross-Roads aid station at mile 52.8, I briefly
          reflected on the fact that I had just completed 2 marathons on rough
          trails. I had already covered a lot of ground, but I still had 10
          more miles comprising the toughest hills of the course before
          reaching the finish line. Another surprise awaited me at this aid
          station. Sarah, Dino and Chauncey had finished their races hours
          before, gone back to the hotel to get showers, and were now waiting
          for me at this aid station. It was great to see everyone and hear
          that they all finished. I was in a groove, a bit tired and
          apparently a little absent minded. As I started leaving the aid
          station, someone asked if I noticed Sarah's bloody nose and
          forehead. Unfortunately I actually hadn't, and simply asked her if
          she fell and then said I need to get going. Later I felt a little
          bad for not noticing and asked more at the next aid station. Other
          than that I was determined and focused solely on finishing the race,
          so off I went.

          The last 10 miles were filled with hills, rocks and lot's of
          darkness. My led headlight helped a lot, but there were still times
          when I wasn't sure if I was on the right trail. Thankfully I caught
          up to another runner that was doing the 100k for the 5th time and he
          seemed to know the course like the back of his hand. That lasted
          for about 20 minutes, until we started the last descent and I began
          to pick up speed. Finally I pulled away from the other runner and
          jogged the last mile or two to the finish, where Sarah, Dino and
          Chauncey were waiting. The Race Director (Joe) was also at the
          finish line where he handed me my first 100k finishers Belt Buckle.
          It was a long and rewarding day for me as I finished in 14:15:53.
          Less than half of the starters would finish before midnight and
          about 25% of the people that started would not finish the race at
          all. I felt relatively good overall and had a huge sense of
          accomplishment knowing that I had finished something that few
          runners dream of – a 100k race on a tough course! The next step is
          attempting the Rocky Raccoon 100 mile Trail Run at the beginning of
          February. Wish me luck, I'll need it!


          "There is another type of strength. It is being able to extend your
          energy for a very long distance." - David LaPierre



          --- In h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com, Christopher Kapraun <cmkapraun@. ..>
          wrote:
          >
          > Tap...tap... tap...
          > Where are the reports?
          > ...or are everyone's fingers still thawing?
          >
          > ...ChrisK
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ____________ _________ _________ __
          > From: Miles Klaff <hmklaff@... >
          > To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com
          > Sent: Thu, January 7, 2010 7:21:59 AM
          > Subject: [h_t_rex] Brrrrrrdera
          >
          > Â
          > Good luck to everyone running Bandera this weekend. I truly hate
          > missing out on this race, but seeing the start-time temperature
          > forecast for 12 degrees (actual, not wind chill), makes it a
          little
          > easier to take. Be careful out there & protect any exposed skin
          until
          > the sun has a chance to warm things up a bit!
          >
          > Miles
          >











        • bob.i.botto@exxonmobil.com
          Guess I m not alone then. Good to know. Bob Bob Botto Analytical Services Laboratory Baytown Complex Laboratory Department 5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Guess I'm not alone then. Good to know.

            Bob

            Bob Botto
            Analytical Services Laboratory
            Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
            5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
            Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
            Phone: 281-834-5133
            Pager: 281-439-1300
            Fax: 281-834-1775
            Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




            Jay Alvarez
            <jpa_1971@yaho
            o.com> To
            Sent by: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
            h_t_rex@yahoog cc
            roups.com
            Subject
            Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
            01/20/10 01:58
            PM


            Please respond
            to
            h_t_rex@yahoog
            roups.com












            Hey Bob,



            I experienced something similar in regard to fluid in the lungs. For
            several days after the race I would weeze any time I would breathe in deep
            or if I went out for a run. Finally all is good and seem to be back to
            normal again.

            Jay

            --- On Wed, 1/20/10, bob.i.botto@...
            <bob.i.botto@...> wrote:

            From: bob.i.botto@... <bob.i.botto@...>
            Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report [2 Attachments]
            To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 1:19 PM




            Great story!!! Congratulations. I experienced what I believe is a
            type of
            pneumonia this past week - several days after finishing Bandera 50k.
            On
            Sunday night I tried to run and could not even jog (10-12 minute
            pace) for
            0.1 miles. I could not get any oxygen to my legs. It was scarey. Now
            I am
            fine and ran 6 miles in 53 minutes yesterday. Anybody else? I'm
            wondering
            if the cold dry air caused a temporary lung irritation filling them
            up with
            fluids and cutting off my air.

            Bob

            Bob Botto
            Analytical Services Laboratory
            Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
            5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
            Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
            Phone: 281-834-5133
            Pager: 281-439-1300
            Fax: 281-834-1775
            Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




            Houston T-REX
            Training Group
            <h_t_rex@yahoo To
            .com> h_t_rex YahooGroup
            Sent by: <h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com>
            h_t_rex@yahoog cc
            roups.com
            Subject
            [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
            01/20/10 12:11
            PM


            Please respond
            to
            h_t_rex@yahoog
            roups.com














            Sorry for the late reply on Bandera, but here's my longggg Race
            report from Bandera. I apologize in advance for the length.

            Last weekend Sarah and I, along with two of our running friends
            (Chauncey and Dino) headed out to Bandera, TX for the Bandera
            25k/50k/100k ultra trail run. The town of Bandera prides itself as
            the "Cowboy Capital of the World" and is located about an hour west
            of San Antonio in the Texas hill country. The Bandera ultra trail
            run is advertised as "A trail run of rugged and brutal beauty where
            everything cuts, stings and bites.' It's also considered one of the
            toughest trail races in the state. My goal was simply to finish my
            first 100k trail race (yes, that's about 62 miles) within the
            allotted time, but in the end I gained a lot more than I expected.

            Friday afternoon the four of us arrived at the Silver Sage Corral in

            the town of Bandera to pick up our race packets, listen to the trail

            briefing and enjoy the pre-race dinner. The race started the next
            day at 7:30am, so this was a good chance to mingle with other ultra
            runners, exchange stories and discuss strategies for the next day's
            run. One topic that seemed to be common was the 11 degree
            temperature predicted for the race start. That's a lot better than
            the 100+ degree weather that Bandera gets during the summer, but
            most of people here that hadn't experienced temperatures this cold.
            We decided that gloves and long running pants would work well for us

            for at least the first few hours. The conversations were great and
            the majority of people were pretty laid back. Most of all, we were
            a group of people simply looking forward to another great day in the

            outdoors on a scenic course.

            After dinner we headed to our hotel only to find that our hotel
            lacked both heat and hot water. The hotel staff was very
            accommodating given the circumstances, and gave us the option of
            staying at another hotel 30 miles away or providing us with two
            space heaters and a few extra blankets. Given the extra distance
            and time that it would take to get to the start of the race we
            decided to take the blankets and suck it up for the night.

            The race morning came way too soon, and the temperature was around
            15 degrees as expected. Hundreds of shivering runners huddled
            around each of the three race starts awaiting the official start.
            Each of the race distances actually started at different places on
            the course so this was the last that I saw of Sarah, Dino and
            Chauncey until after they finished their respective races.

            At 7:30am the races began and I tried not to think about covering 62

            miles before the end of the day. My plan was to focus on one aid
            station at a time, and only think of how many aid stations were left

            instead of how many miles I had to run. `One aid station down,
            eleven to go', just sounded so much better than 56 miles to the
            finish.

            The first 10 miles went by in a flash and it was odd how quickly I
            needed to shed my gloves and unzip my sweatshirt, while at the same
            time my water bottle bite valve continued to ice over every few
            minutes. A little while later I heard music blaring from the next
            aide station and as I rolled in volunteers flocked to see what I
            needed… refill your water bottle, grilled cheese sandwich, candy?
            The volunteers at each of the aid stations were really awesome and
            made sure that each runner got what they needed before heading out
            to the next aid station. I decided to start eating real food (half
            of a grilled cheese sandwich in this case) and planned to continue
            eating real food every 5-6 miles for the rest of the day. This
            worked really well for me and as a result I was able to keep up my
            energy for most of the day.

            At the same time that I was leaving my third aid station, Sarah had
            just slipped on Bandera's rugged and unforgiving course, where she
            broke her nose and picked up a few additional scrapes and bruises.
            After a few moments she simply brushed herself off and continued
            running the remaining 20+ miles to finish her 3rd 50km trail race.
            She's a pretty tough girl and I'm glad that she's my wife! I didn't
            find out that she fell until well into my second lap, but I did
            wonder how everyone was doing as the morning went on. After
            crossing the 25k mark I also thought how Chauncey would soon be
            finishing his 25k race.

            For the remainder of the morning I ran with a few small groups of
            people as the runners quickly thinned out. Trail runners are great
            for conversing on the trail and I was able to share stories of
            running Mt. Si and Tiger Mountain, WA with someone who traveled from

            Seattle, WA, and about Michigan's Toyota Great Lakes Relay with
            someone from Detroit. Before I knew it, I had come to the halfway
            point and I was way ahead of schedule. I planned on doing my first
            50k in around 7hrs, but came in under 6hrs. Seeing that I had time
            to spare, I decided to relax change socks and shirts and grab some
            food before tackling the next 50k. And boy did that feel great! I
            knew that the run was far from over and wanted to make sure I was
            ready for whatever it had in store for me. About 5 minutes later I
            rolled out of the aid station and hoped I could stay injury free and

            finish the last 50k before midnight. The race cutoff was actually
            7:30am, but I wanted to finish somewhere between 10 and 11pm.

            A little while later I thought of Dino and Sarah as they were
            finishing their 50k and heading back to the hotel to see if we had
            any hot water. Later I would find out that our hotel still didn't
            have hot water, but they were all able to use another room that did
            have hot water. It's amazing how you start to appreciate the simple
            things when you don't have them.

            Finally nightfall arrived and the temperature began to retreat from
            the mid 40s back into the 30s. I was still slightly ahead of
            schedule, but knew that the remaining 15+ miles that I had to
            complete would be tough. By now the heard had thinned out
            sufficiently such that it was normal to spend up to 30 minutes on
            the trail without seeing anyone. Night also made navigating rocks
            and hills more difficult. Without someone to follow, there were
            several times that I wasn't sure if I was still on the right trail.
            Thank goodness I didn't get lost in the middle of nowhere at night,
            especially when I was starting to get cold!

            As I came into the Cross-Roads aid station at mile 52.8, I briefly
            reflected on the fact that I had just completed 2 marathons on rough

            trails. I had already covered a lot of ground, but I still had 10
            more miles comprising the toughest hills of the course before
            reaching the finish line. Another surprise awaited me at this aid
            station. Sarah, Dino and Chauncey had finished their races hours
            before, gone back to the hotel to get showers, and were now waiting
            for me at this aid station. It was great to see everyone and hear
            that they all finished. I was in a groove, a bit tired and
            apparently a little absent minded. As I started leaving the aid
            station, someone asked if I noticed Sarah's bloody nose and
            forehead. Unfortunately I actually hadn't, and simply asked her if
            she fell and then said I need to get going. Later I felt a little
            bad for not noticing and asked more at the next aid station. Other
            than that I was determined and focused solely on finishing the race,

            so off I went.

            The last 10 miles were filled with hills, rocks and lot's of
            darkness. My led headlight helped a lot, but there were still times
            when I wasn't sure if I was on the right trail. Thankfully I caught
            up to another runner that was doing the 100k for the 5th time and he

            seemed to know the course like the back of his hand. That lasted
            for about 20 minutes, until we started the last descent and I began
            to pick up speed. Finally I pulled away from the other runner and
            jogged the last mile or two to the finish, where Sarah, Dino and
            Chauncey were waiting. The Race Director (Joe) was also at the
            finish line where he handed me my first 100k finishers Belt Buckle.
            It was a long and rewarding day for me as I finished in 14:15:53.
            Less than half of the starters would finish before midnight and
            about 25% of the people that started would not finish the race at
            all. I felt relatively good overall and had a huge sense of
            accomplishment knowing that I had finished something that few
            runners dream of – a 100k race on a tough course! The next step is
            attempting the Rocky Raccoon 100 mile Trail Run at the beginning of
            February. Wish me luck, I'll need it!


            "There is another type of strength. It is being able to extend your
            energy for a very long distance." - David LaPierre



            --- In h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com, Christopher Kapraun <cmkapraun@.
            ..>
            wrote:
            >
            > Tap...tap... tap...
            > Where are the reports?
            > ...or are everyone's fingers still thawing?
            >
            > ...ChrisK
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ____________ _________ _________ __
            > From: Miles Klaff <hmklaff@... >
            > To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com
            > Sent: Thu, January 7, 2010 7:21:59 AM
            > Subject: [h_t_rex] Brrrrrrdera
            >
            > Â
            > Good luck to everyone running Bandera this weekend. I truly hate
            > missing out on this race, but seeing the start-time temperature
            > forecast for 12 degrees (actual, not wind chill), makes it a
            little
            > easier to take. Be careful out there & protect any exposed skin
            until
            > the sun has a chance to warm things up a bit!
            >
            > Miles
            >
          • bklynsue@gmail.com
            I usually experience wheezing when doing Bandera and fluids in the lungs for a few days. Usually, I can’t sleep after the race because I’m wheezing so
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
            • 0 Attachment

              I usually experience wheezing when doing Bandera and fluids in the lungs for a few days. Usually, I can’t sleep after the race because I’m wheezing so loud. I think it is the combination of high cedar pollen and cold air.   

               


              From: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com [mailto:h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jay Alvarez
              Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 1:59 PM
              To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report

               

               

              Hey Bob,

               

              I experienced something similar in regard to fluid in the lungs. For several days after the race I would weeze any time I would breathe in deep or if I went out for a run. Finally all is good and seem to be back to normal again.

               

              Jay

              --- On Wed, 1/20/10, bob.i.botto@ exxonmobil. com <bob.i.botto@ exxonmobil. com> wrote:


              From: bob.i.botto@ exxonmobil. com <bob.i.botto@ exxonmobil. com>
              Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report [2 Attachments]
              To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com
              Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 1:19 PM

               



              Great story!!! Congratulations. I experienced what I believe is a type of
              pneumonia this past week - several days after finishing Bandera 50k. On
              Sunday night I tried to run and could not even jog (10-12 minute pace) for
              0.1 miles. I could not get any oxygen to my legs. It was scarey. Now I am
              fine and ran 6 miles in 53 minutes yesterday. Anybody else? I'm wondering
              if the cold dry air caused a temporary lung irritation filling them up with
              fluids and cutting off my air.

              Bob

              Bob Botto
              Analytical Services Laboratory
              Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
              5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown , Tx 77520
              Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
              Phone: 281-834-5133
              Pager: 281-439-1300
              Fax: 281-834-1775
              Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




              Houston T-REX
              Training Group
              <h_t_rex@yahoo To
              .com> h_t_rex YahooGroup
              Sent by: <h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com>
              h_t_rex@yahoog cc
              roups.com
              Subject
              [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
              01/20/10 12:11
              PM


              Please respond
              to
              h_t_rex@yahoog
              roups.com














              Sorry for the late reply on Bandera, but here's my longggg Race
              report from Bandera. I apologize in advance for the length.

              Last weekend Sarah and I, along with two of our running friends
              (Chauncey and Dino) headed out to Bandera , TX for the Bandera
              25k/50k/100k ultra trail run. The town of Bandera prides itself as
              the "Cowboy Capital of the World" and is located about an hour west
              of San Antonio in the Texas hill country. The Bandera ultra trail
              run is advertised as "A trail run of rugged and brutal beauty where
              everything cuts, stings and bites.' It's also considered one of the
              toughest trail races in the state. My goal was simply to finish my
              first 100k trail race (yes, that's about 62 miles) within the
              allotted time, but in the end I gained a lot more than I expected.

              Friday afternoon the four of us arrived at the Silver Sage Corral in
              the town of Bandera to pick up our race packets, listen to the trail
              briefing and enjoy the pre-race dinner. The race started the next
              day at 7:30am, so this was a good chance to mingle with other ultra
              runners, exchange stories and discuss strategies for the next day's
              run. One topic that seemed to be common was the 11 degree
              temperature predicted for the race start. That's a lot better than
              the 100+ degree weather that Bandera gets during the summer, but
              most of people here that hadn't experienced temperatures this cold.
              We decided that gloves and long running pants would work well for us
              for at least the first few hours. The conversations were great and
              the majority of people were pretty laid back. Most of all, we were
              a group of people simply looking forward to another great day in the
              outdoors on a scenic course.

              After dinner we headed to our hotel only to find that our hotel
              lacked both heat and hot water. The hotel staff was very
              accommodating given the circumstances, and gave us the option of
              staying at another hotel 30 miles away or providing us with two
              space heaters and a few extra blankets. Given the extra distance
              and time that it would take to get to the start of the race we
              decided to take the blankets and suck it up for the night.

              The race morning came way too soon, and the temperature was around
              15 degrees as expected. Hundreds of shivering runners huddled
              around each of the three race starts awaiting the official start.
              Each of the race distances actually started at different places on
              the course so this was the last that I saw of Sarah, Dino and
              Chauncey until after they finished their respective races.

              At 7:30am the races began and I tried not to think about covering 62
              miles before the end of the day. My plan was to focus on one aid
              station at a time, and only think of how many aid stations were left
              instead of how many miles I had to run. `One aid station down,
              eleven to go', just sounded so much better than 56 miles to the
              finish.

              The first 10 miles went by in a flash and it was odd how quickly I
              needed to shed my gloves and unzip my sweatshirt, while at the same
              time my water bottle bite valve continued to ice over every few
              minutes. A little while later I heard music blaring from the next
              aide station and as I rolled in volunteers flocked to see what I
              needed… refill your water bottle, grilled cheese sandwich, candy?
              The volunteers at each of the aid stations were really awesome and
              made sure that each runner got what they needed before heading out
              to the next aid station. I decided to start eating real food (half
              of a grilled cheese sandwich in this case) and planned to continue
              eating real food every 5-6 miles for the rest of the day. This
              worked really well for me and as a result I was able to keep up my
              energy for most of the day.

              At the same time that I was leaving my third aid station, Sarah had
              just slipped on Bandera's rugged and unforgiving course, where she
              broke her nose and picked up a few additional scrapes and bruises.
              After a few moments she simply brushed herself off and continued
              running the remaining 20+ miles to finish her 3rd 50km trail race.
              She's a pretty tough girl and I'm glad that she's my wife! I didn't
              find out that she fell until well into my second lap, but I did
              wonder how everyone was doing as the morning went on. After
              crossing the 25k mark I also thought how Chauncey would soon be
              finishing his 25k race.

              For the remainder of the morning I ran with a few small groups of
              people as the runners quickly thinned out. Trail runners are great
              for conversing on the trail and I was able to share stories of
              running Mt. Si and Tiger Mountain , WA with someone who traveled from
              Seattle , WA , and about Michigan 's Toyota Great Lakes Relay with
              someone from Detroit . Before I knew it, I had come to the halfway
              point and I was way ahead of schedule. I planned on doing my first
              50k in around 7hrs, but came in under 6hrs. Seeing that I had time
              to spare, I decided to relax change socks and shirts and grab some
              food before tackling the next 50k. And boy did that feel great! I
              knew that the run was far from over and wanted to make sure I was
              ready for whatever it had in store for me. About 5 minutes later I
              rolled out of the aid station and hoped I could stay injury free and
              finish the last 50k before midnight. The race cutoff was actually
              7:30am, but I wanted to finish somewhere between 10 and 11pm.

              A little while later I thought of Dino and Sarah as they were
              finishing their 50k and heading back to the hotel to see if we had
              any hot water. Later I would find out that our hotel still didn't
              have hot water, but they were all able to use another room that did
              have hot water. It's amazing how you start to appreciate the simple
              things when you don't have them.

              Finally nightfall arrived and the temperature began to retreat from
              the mid 40s back into the 30s. I was still slightly ahead of
              schedule, but knew that the remaining 15+ miles that I had to
              complete would be tough. By now the heard had thinned out
              sufficiently such that it was normal to spend up to 30 minutes on
              the trail without seeing anyone. Night also made navigating rocks
              and hills more difficult. Without someone to follow, there were
              several times that I wasn't sure if I was still on the right trail.
              Thank goodness I didn't get lost in the middle of nowhere at night,
              especially when I was starting to get cold!

              As I came into the Cross-Roads aid station at mile 52.8, I briefly
              reflected on the fact that I had just completed 2 marathons on rough
              trails. I had already covered a lot of ground, but I still had 10
              more miles comprising the toughest hills of the course before
              reaching the finish line. Another surprise awaited me at this aid
              station. Sarah, Dino and Chauncey had finished their races hours
              before, gone back to the hotel to get showers, and were now waiting
              for me at this aid station. It was great to see everyone and hear
              that they all finished. I was in a groove, a bit tired and
              apparently a little absent minded. As I started leaving the aid
              station, someone asked if I noticed Sarah's bloody nose and
              forehead. Unfortunately I actually hadn't, and simply asked her if
              she fell and then said I need to get going. Later I felt a little
              bad for not noticing and asked more at the next aid station. Other
              than that I was determined and focused solely on finishing the race,
              so off I went.

              The last 10 miles were filled with hills, rocks and lot's of
              darkness. My led headlight helped a lot, but there were still times
              when I wasn't sure if I was on the right trail. Thankfully I caught
              up to another runner that was doing the 100k for the 5th time and he
              seemed to know the course like the back of his hand. That lasted
              for about 20 minutes, until we started the last descent and I began
              to pick up speed. Finally I pulled away from the other runner and
              jogged the last mile or two to the finish, where Sarah, Dino and
              Chauncey were waiting. The Race Director (Joe) was also at the
              finish line where he handed me my first 100k finishers Belt Buckle.
              It was a long and rewarding day for me as I finished in 14:15:53.
              Less than half of the starters would finish before midnight and
              about 25% of the people that started would not finish the race at
              all. I felt relatively good overall and had a huge sense of
              accomplishment knowing that I had finished something that few
              runners dream of – a 100k race on a tough course! The next step is
              attempting the Rocky Raccoon 100 mile Trail Run at the beginning of
              February. Wish me luck, I'll need it!


              "There is another type of strength. It is being able to extend your
              energy for a very long distance." - David LaPierre



              --- In h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com, Christopher Kapraun <cmkapraun@. ..>
              wrote:
              >
              > Tap...tap... tap...
              > Where are the reports?
              > ...or are everyone's fingers still thawing?
              >
              > ...ChrisK
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ __
              > From: Miles Klaff <hmklaff@... >
              > To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com
              > Sent: Thu, January 7, 2010 7:21:59 AM
              > Subject: [h_t_rex] Brrrrrrdera
              >
              > Â
              > Good luck to everyone running Bandera this weekend. I truly hate
              > missing out on this race, but seeing the start-time temperature
              > forecast for 12 degrees (actual, not wind chill), makes it a
              little
              > easier to take. Be careful out there & protect any exposed skin
              until
              > the sun has a chance to warm things up a bit!
              >
              > Miles
              >









               

            • bob.i.botto@exxonmobil.com
              Yes very likely it is. It did not help me that I was also staying with my daughter and she has 3 cats I m allergic to. Bob Bob Botto Analytical Services
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Yes very likely it is. It did not help me that I was also staying with my
                daughter and she has 3 cats I'm allergic to.

                Bob

                Bob Botto
                Analytical Services Laboratory
                Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
                5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
                Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
                Phone: 281-834-5133
                Pager: 281-439-1300
                Fax: 281-834-1775
                Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




                <bklynsue@gmai
                l.com>
                Sent by: To
                h_t_rex@yahoog <h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com>
                roups.com cc

                Subject
                01/20/10 02:33 RE: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
                PM


                Please respond
                to
                h_t_rex@yahoog
                roups.com











                I usually experience wheezing when doing Bandera and fluids in the lungs
                for a few days. Usually, I can’t sleep after the race because I’m wheezing
                so loud. I think it is the combination of high cedar pollen and cold
                air.








                From: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com [mailto:h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Jay Alvarez
                Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 1:59 PM
                To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report









                Hey Bob,





                I experienced something similar in regard to fluid in the lungs. For
                several days after the race I would weeze any time I would breathe in deep
                or if I went out for a run. Finally all is good and seem to be back to
                normal again.





                Jay

                --- On Wed, 1/20/10, bob.i.botto@...
                <bob.i.botto@...> wrote:



                From: bob.i.botto@... <bob.i.botto@...>
                Subject: Re: [h_t_rex] Bandera Report [2 Attachments]
                To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 1:19 PM







                Great story!!! Congratulations. I experienced what I believe is a
                type of
                pneumonia this past week - several days after finishing Bandera 50k.
                On
                Sunday night I tried to run and could not even jog (10-12 minute
                pace) for
                0.1 miles. I could not get any oxygen to my legs. It was scarey. Now
                I am
                fine and ran 6 miles in 53 minutes yesterday. Anybody else? I'm
                wondering
                if the cold dry air caused a temporary lung irritation filling them
                up with
                fluids and cutting off my air.

                Bob

                Bob Botto
                Analytical Services Laboratory
                Baytown Complex Laboratory Department
                5000 Bayway Dr. Baytown, Tx 77520
                Company Mail: CORP-BSL-103
                Phone: 281-834-5133
                Pager: 281-439-1300
                Fax: 281-834-1775
                Join the ExxonMobil Corporate Track & Field Team!




                Houston T-REX
                Training Group
                <h_t_rex@yahoo To
                .com> h_t_rex YahooGroup
                Sent by: <h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com>
                h_t_rex@yahoog cc
                roups.com
                Subject
                [h_t_rex] Bandera Report
                01/20/10 12:11
                PM


                Please respond
                to
                h_t_rex@yahoog
                roups.com














                Sorry for the late reply on Bandera, but here's my longggg Race
                report from Bandera. I apologize in advance for the length.

                Last weekend Sarah and I, along with two of our running friends
                (Chauncey and Dino) headed out to Bandera, TX for the Bandera
                25k/50k/100k ultra trail run. The town of Bandera prides itself as
                the "Cowboy Capital of the World" and is located about an hour west
                of San Antonio in the Texas hill country. The Bandera ultra trail
                run is advertised as "A trail run of rugged and brutal beauty where
                everything cuts, stings and bites.' It's also considered one of the
                toughest trail races in the state. My goal was simply to finish my
                first 100k trail race (yes, that's about 62 miles) within the
                allotted time, but in the end I gained a lot more than I expected.

                Friday afternoon the four of us arrived at the Silver Sage Corral in

                the town of Bandera to pick up our race packets, listen to the trail

                briefing and enjoy the pre-race dinner. The race started the next
                day at 7:30am, so this was a good chance to mingle with other ultra
                runners, exchange stories and discuss strategies for the next day's
                run. One topic that seemed to be common was the 11 degree
                temperature predicted for the race start. That's a lot better than
                the 100+ degree weather that Bandera gets during the summer, but
                most of people here that hadn't experienced temperatures this cold.
                We decided that gloves and long running pants would work well for us

                for at least the first few hours. The conversations were great and
                the majority of people were pretty laid back. Most of all, we were
                a group of people simply looking forward to another great day in the

                outdoors on a scenic course.

                After dinner we headed to our hotel only to find that our hotel
                lacked both heat and hot water. The hotel staff was very
                accommodating given the circumstances, and gave us the option of
                staying at another hotel 30 miles away or providing us with two
                space heaters and a few extra blankets. Given the extra distance
                and time that it would take to get to the start of the race we
                decided to take the blankets and suck it up for the night.

                The race morning came way too soon, and the temperature was around
                15 degrees as expected. Hundreds of shivering runners huddled
                around each of the three race starts awaiting the official start.
                Each of the race distances actually started at different places on
                the course so this was the last that I saw of Sarah, Dino and
                Chauncey until after they finished their respective races.

                At 7:30am the races began and I tried not to think about covering 62

                miles before the end of the day. My plan was to focus on one aid
                station at a time, and only think of how many aid stations were left

                instead of how many miles I had to run. `One aid station down,
                eleven to go', just sounded so much better than 56 miles to the
                finish.

                The first 10 miles went by in a flash and it was odd how quickly I
                needed to shed my gloves and unzip my sweatshirt, while at the same
                time my water bottle bite valve continued to ice over every few
                minutes. A little while later I heard music blaring from the next
                aide station and as I rolled in volunteers flocked to see what I
                needed… refill your water bottle, grilled cheese sandwich, candy?
                The volunteers at each of the aid stations were really awesome and
                made sure that each runner got what they needed before heading out
                to the next aid station. I decided to start eating real food (half
                of a grilled cheese sandwich in this case) and planned to continue
                eating real food every 5-6 miles for the rest of the day. This
                worked really well for me and as a result I was able to keep up my
                energy for most of the day.

                At the same time that I was leaving my third aid station, Sarah had
                just slipped on Bandera's rugged and unforgiving course, where she
                broke her nose and picked up a few additional scrapes and bruises.
                After a few moments she simply brushed herself off and continued
                running the remaining 20+ miles to finish her 3rd 50km trail race.
                She's a pretty tough girl and I'm glad that she's my wife! I didn't
                find out that she fell until well into my second lap, but I did
                wonder how everyone was doing as the morning went on. After
                crossing the 25k mark I also thought how Chauncey would soon be
                finishing his 25k race.

                For the remainder of the morning I ran with a few small groups of
                people as the runners quickly thinned out. Trail runners are great
                for conversing on the trail and I was able to share stories of
                running Mt. Si and Tiger Mountain, WA with someone who traveled from

                Seattle, WA, and about Michigan's Toyota Great Lakes Relay with
                someone from Detroit. Before I knew it, I had come to the halfway
                point and I was way ahead of schedule. I planned on doing my first
                50k in around 7hrs, but came in under 6hrs. Seeing that I had time
                to spare, I decided to relax change socks and shirts and grab some
                food before tackling the next 50k. And boy did that feel great! I
                knew that the run was far from over and wanted to make sure I was
                ready for whatever it had in store for me. About 5 minutes later I
                rolled out of the aid station and hoped I could stay injury free and

                finish the last 50k before midnight. The race cutoff was actually
                7:30am, but I wanted to finish somewhere between 10 and 11pm.

                A little while later I thought of Dino and Sarah as they were
                finishing their 50k and heading back to the hotel to see if we had
                any hot water. Later I would find out that our hotel still didn't
                have hot water, but they were all able to use another room that did
                have hot water. It's amazing how you start to appreciate the simple
                things when you don't have them.

                Finally nightfall arrived and the temperature began to retreat from
                the mid 40s back into the 30s. I was still slightly ahead of
                schedule, but knew that the remaining 15+ miles that I had to
                complete would be tough. By now the heard had thinned out
                sufficiently such that it was normal to spend up to 30 minutes on
                the trail without seeing anyone. Night also made navigating rocks
                and hills more difficult. Without someone to follow, there were
                several times that I wasn't sure if I was still on the right trail.
                Thank goodness I didn't get lost in the middle of nowhere at night,
                especially when I was starting to get cold!

                As I came into the Cross-Roads aid station at mile 52.8, I briefly
                reflected on the fact that I had just completed 2 marathons on rough

                trails. I had already covered a lot of ground, but I still had 10
                more miles comprising the toughest hills of the course before
                reaching the finish line. Another surprise awaited me at this aid
                station. Sarah, Dino and Chauncey had finished their races hours
                before, gone back to the hotel to get showers, and were now waiting
                for me at this aid station. It was great to see everyone and hear
                that they all finished. I was in a groove, a bit tired and
                apparently a little absent minded. As I started leaving the aid
                station, someone asked if I noticed Sarah's bloody nose and
                forehead. Unfortunately I actually hadn't, and simply asked her if
                she fell and then said I need to get going. Later I felt a little
                bad for not noticing and asked more at the next aid station. Other
                than that I was determined and focused solely on finishing the race,

                so off I went.

                The last 10 miles were filled with hills, rocks and lot's of
                darkness. My led headlight helped a lot, but there were still times
                when I wasn't sure if I was on the right trail. Thankfully I caught
                up to another runner that was doing the 100k for the 5th time and he

                seemed to know the course like the back of his hand. That lasted
                for about 20 minutes, until we started the last descent and I began
                to pick up speed. Finally I pulled away from the other runner and
                jogged the last mile or two to the finish, where Sarah, Dino and
                Chauncey were waiting. The Race Director (Joe) was also at the
                finish line where he handed me my first 100k finishers Belt Buckle.
                It was a long and rewarding day for me as I finished in 14:15:53.
                Less than half of the starters would finish before midnight and
                about 25% of the people that started would not finish the race at
                all. I felt relatively good overall and had a huge sense of
                accomplishment knowing that I had finished something that few
                runners dream of – a 100k race on a tough course! The next step is
                attempting the Rocky Raccoon 100 mile Trail Run at the beginning of
                February. Wish me luck, I'll need it!


                "There is another type of strength. It is being able to extend your
                energy for a very long distance." - David LaPierre



                --- In h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com, Christopher Kapraun <cmkapraun@.
                ..>
                wrote:
                >
                > Tap...tap... tap...
                > Where are the reports?
                > ...or are everyone's fingers still thawing?
                >
                > ...ChrisK
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ____________ _________ _________ __
                > From: Miles Klaff <hmklaff@... >
                > To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups .com
                > Sent: Thu, January 7, 2010 7:21:59 AM
                > Subject: [h_t_rex] Brrrrrrdera
                >
                > Â
                > Good luck to everyone running Bandera this weekend. I truly hate
                > missing out on this race, but seeing the start-time temperature
                > forecast for 12 degrees (actual, not wind chill), makes it a
                little
                > easier to take. Be careful out there & protect any exposed skin
                until
                > the sun has a chance to warm things up a bit!
                >
                > Miles
                >
              • lynnor matheney
                It takes me 2-3 days to wheeze it off after a Bandera event too. I ran the Houston half marathon with my kids, this past Sunday, no wheezing, but geez, the
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 20, 2010
                • 0 Attachment

                  It takes me 2-3 days to wheeze it off after a Bandera event too. I ran the Houston half marathon with my kids, this past Sunday, no wheezing, but geez, the pavement pounding over a short distance really took a surprising toll on my legs. Today is the first day I've been able to walk normally w/o wincing.
                   
                  Lynnor Matheney
                • Korona, Adam
                  Thanks for all of the great comments. Bandera rocked! Hopefully I ll see all of you at Rocky in a few weeks. Right now I m still recovering from Bandera and
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 21, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Thanks for all of the great comments.  Bandera rocked!

                    Hopefully I’ll see all of you at Rocky in a few weeks.  Right now I’m still recovering from Bandera and hoping I’ll be ready to complete my first 100 Miler!

                     

                    Enjoy,

                    Adam

                     

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