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My WS re-cap....

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  • Stuart Skeeter
    Here s a brief re-cap of my weekend attempting the Western States 100. This was what I posted to some family & friends, so I m sorry about the names that many
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 30, 2009
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      Here's a brief re-cap of my weekend attempting the Western States 100. This was what I posted to some family & friends, so I'm sorry about the names that many won't recognize....but here goes.


      -Race buzz around Squaw Valley was very cool. Staying 100 yards from the start line was the best.
      -The whole check-in, medical stuff was kinda weird...not bad, just kinda "commercial"?
      -The organization is amazing with everything being executed to near perfection.
      -It was fun spending some time with Gabe Ayson, Henry Hobbs and Dmitry Rozinsky, all from Austin. My wife Claire was able to join me on one of my ultra road trips and and crew for the first time.

      -Sat morning alarm clock chimes at 3:15...wow, that's early. Restless night for sure.
      -The electricity at the start is very cool. The lights lining the ski slope have their orangy glow.
      -I am standing here at the start thinking "I am REALLY here..this is WS and I deserve having a bib number."
      -The countdown, the shotgun blast...I glance back and Claire snaps one more early pic.
      -The climb to Escarpment (3.5 mi) went really well...55 min. Not as bad as I'd imagined.
      -We crest at the top and I stop to look over my right shoulder.... what a glorius sunrise..."this is the day...."
      -I fall into the conga line at a nice pace as we roll through the upper tundra....it is cool and lovely.
      -This sweet rolling downhill singletrack rolls along and pace is solid. Matt Crownover from Dallas passes and is moving swiftly.
      -Lyon Ridge aid (10.5) is the first stop and I'm right on pace...feeling great, simply topping off bottles.
      -The trail is simply beautiful......lots of wildflowers.

      -Rolling into Red Star (16), the dusty trails lead you down through old growth pine forests with flourescent green moss.
      -Red Star is good, quick for an Ensure and chat with Gabe & Dmitry. I need some of Dmitry's sunscreen. Pace still OK.
      -This stretch is loooonnnng...but very pretty and very exposed. I turn my cap sideways, gangsta style to keep sun from scorching the left side of my face.
      -On to Duncan Canyon where it rolls along ridgelines with awesome views and beautiful flowers.
      -Descent into Duncan Canyon is fairly steep and very dusty...both quads and lungs are burning.
      -Aid at Duncan is quick and as I leave, the aid station captain comments on my button-up, lightweight fishing shirt I'm wearing.
      -At this point, I am a few min behind 30 hr pace, but still feeling good and positive. Hydrating and eating well.
      -There's a lush, shady trail that drops down to a creek where I'm able to dunk my cap and bandana...sweet relief.
      -The switchback climb from the creek bottom is mild at first, not bad, but then becomes exposed in the charred area from previous forest fires.
      -This easy switchback climb turns into a long, steep uphill grade which is punishing..funny how Henry said it "wasn't that bad"... Dmitry caught up with me and offered some encouragement.
      -I roll into Robinson Flat (29.7) about 20 min past 30-hr pace and I'm feeling kinda gassed. Not bad, but getting warm. My weight is dead-on from the start...173lbs. I feel hydrated, but know I need some calories.

      -Claire and friend David are right there to tend to me, though can't cross into the aid station area. So, I sit in a chair in the hot sun with a wet towel over head while Claire unlaces my shoes. I wipe feet off and change socks. No blisters despite the dust...amazing. I drink an Ensure over ice, but nothing else really seems palatable. No pizza, nothing really. My calories are still OK from my Clip mix and I'm taking Hammer gels pretty consistently on the hour. I leave Robinson about 20 min behind 30 hr pace, but know there is lots of downhill where I can make it up.
      -Downhill, yes...onto Dusty Corners (38) where my second crew (buddies Ron & Lawrence) have driven to meet me. This is another long stretch that should be runnable, but now my stomach is not cooperating. Not sloshy as I am taking salt. I just feel nauseous. So I walk as quickly as possibly, but the tummy does not settle. I am not able to drink now like I know I need to.
      -I pull into Dusty Corners and am met by two friends that squeeze my quads while I eat a Slim Jim..thinking the salty, fatty snack would help to settle the stomach. I top off bottles and leave quickly, spending only a couple of min there.
      -This is where I really need to press...I know I have sweet runnable downhill and can make up some time. But I can't...I just can't get it going...much is exposed and though it's not Texas type heat, it is still very warm. I need to run, but my queesy stomach won't let me push or drink like I need to. I carry a slow trudge into Last Chance at mile 43.
      -Weigh in at Last Chance shows me 7lbs down....not good...not good at all. Now that I think about it, I haven't peed in about 6 hrs. I know I need to sit and push some liquids. I eat some crackers and a half of grilled cheese. I take two salt tabs and drink two full bottles of water. Gabe has passed through quickly looking better than me but stating he does not feel well. Not feeling better, but knowing I have to move....I pull out a few min behind Gabe.
      -OK, so I have about 4 miles of downhill to the river and I run...I run quickly in some spots then walk other sections, bordering on barfing all the while. It gets hotter as I drop deeper into Deadwood Canyon. It is shaded, but no breeze in the canyon makes it pretty stifling. I am slowing and finally hit the swinging bridge. I look below and Dmitry is in the water trying to cool down and ice his legs. I don't have the time so I keep on.
      -Arnold Espe from San Antonio catches me on the other side and we begin climbing. He is struggling too. It is smokin' and I am soaking wet with sweat, yet haven't taken a sip of water since Last Chance. I simply cannot drink.
      -The climb up to Devil's thumb is 1800 feet in 1.4 miles. It is tough even when you feel good...but I was not and it was brutal. Step, step, step....stop, dry heave...hands on knees....calves are cramping like never before. This was not good.
      -About 2/3 of the way up, Arnold pulled away and Dmitry passed. Two of the safety sweeps pulled in behind me and one stayed with me to the top. I think it took about 1:20 to climb what normally should have taken about 45 min.
      -I arrive at Devil's Thumb...I am done...D-O-N-E.....13:56....I am about 10 min past cutoff and the aid crew is already packing up. I sit briefly, drinking some Sprite and broth. Gabe, Arnold and Dmitry are all in chairs themselves...the Texas contingent is toasted. (Matt Crownover from Dallas is the only Texas finisher...25 hrs and change)

      -Arnold and I load into a car with another dropped runner and an aidstation work drives us back to Foresthill. The ride was painful as my legs and hips continued to cramp uncontrollably.
      -Arriving at Foresthill, we hooked up again with Gabe and camped out in front of the aid station. We knew that my wife Clare and my pacers, along with Henry & Janice were all waiting for us to appear at Michigan Bluff. We wandered for a few minutes, then sat down and just waited. The sun had gone down and now the warm pavement actually felt good. I finally wandered over to the aid station and got 2 more bottles of Sprite ingested. A bit later I had the aid station medical weigh me and I was still 4 pounds down.
      -I checked the "drop" list again to find an impressive list of very stout runners (our own Tim Neckar included) that had experienced their own problems and dropped.

      -Claire and my crew/pacers found me at about 10:30pm and were all disappointed, but relieved to see that I was OK.
      -We made our way to the hotel while I ate a cold, 4-hour old cheeseburger and drank more.
      -After a short shower to rinse off the first layer of dirt, I fell into bed for a decent night sleep.

      -Morning came and Claire and I met my crew at Denny's for a big breakfast. They left and headed back to Reno and Claire and I proceeded to the Placer High School track. We hooked up with Gabe, Janice, Henry & Dmitry.
      -We gathered our drop bags from the infield, then sat in the only shaded corner of the bleachers watching runners come down Finley and hit the high school track. Turns out, it was estimated to be 103F+ in the canyons the previous day.
      -Watching the runners come in within the last hour of the 30 hour cutoff was amazing and inspirational. It was difficult to watch, however, having stood on the track myself the previous Thursday morning imaginging myself being there to cross the finish line.

      This was an amazing weekend with lots of memories...some good, others disappointing. We try and try and try and despite our efforts, sometimes things do not turn out like we had hoped. But such is life. We learn, we live, we grow...each in our own way from our own experiences.

      Thanks for your interest in support of all of us that represented Texas.

      Stuart Skeeter
      Clear Lake, TX
    • Patrick McCartney
      Great job Stuart. That was a brutal day for a 100-mile run in the mountains. I paced for a guy who has done almost 100 100-milers and has never dropped from
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Great job Stuart.  That was a brutal day for a 100-mile run in the mountains.  I paced for a guy who has done almost 100 100-milers and has never dropped from any of them.  However, when I met him in Foresthill, I had never seen him so trashed.  It was pretty questionable even for him.  As you said, the day took its toll quick on even the most experienced runners.  Regardless, that’s the great thing about ultras … I can’t think of any other sport where you can ask yourself before each race, “How will my life be different after this one?”.  Take care!

         


        From: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com [mailto: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Stuart Skeeter
        Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 10:36 PM
        To: h_t_rex@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [h_t_rex] My WS re-cap....

         




        Here ' s a brief re-cap of my weekend attempting the Western States 100. This was what I posted to some family & friends, so I ' m sorry about the names that many won ' t recognize... .but here goes.


        -Race buzz around Squaw Valley was very cool. Staying 100 yards from the start line was the best.
        -The whole check-in, medical stuff was kinda weird...not bad, just kinda "commercial" ?
        -The organization is amazing with everything being executed to near perfection.
        -It was fun spending some time with Gabe Ayson, Henry Hobbs and Dmitry Rozinsky, all from Austin . My wife Claire was able to join me on one of my ultra road trips and and crew for the first time.

        -Sat morning alarm clock chimes at 3:15...wow, that ' s early. Restless night for sure.
        -The electricity at the start is very cool. The lights lining the ski slope have their orangy glow.
        -I am standing here at the start thinking "I am REALLY here..this is WS and I deserve having a bib number."
        -The countdown, the shotgun blast...I glance back and Claire snaps one more early pic.
        -The climb to Escarpment (3.5 mi) went really well...55 min. Not as bad as I ' d imagined.
        -We crest at the top and I stop to look over my right shoulder.... what a glorius sunrise..."this is the day...."
        -I fall into the conga line at a nice pace as we roll through the upper tundra....it is cool and lovely.
        -This sweet rolling downhill singletrack rolls along and pace is solid. Matt Crownover from Dallas passes and is moving swiftly.
        -Lyon Ridge aid (10.5) is the first stop and I ' m right on pace...feeling great, simply topping off bottles.
        -The trail is simply beautiful... ...lots of wildflowers.

        -Rolling into Red Star (16), the dusty trails lead you down through old growth pine forests with flourescent green moss.
        -Red Star is good, quick for an Ensure and chat with Gabe & Dmitry. I need some of Dmitry ' s sunscreen. Pace still OK.
        -This stretch is loooonnnng.. .but very pretty and very exposed. I turn my cap sideways, gangsta style to keep sun from scorching the left side of my face.
        -On to Duncan Canyon where it rolls along ridgelines with awesome views and beautiful flowers.
        -Descent into Duncan Canyon is fairly steep and very dusty...both quads and lungs are burning.
        -Aid at Duncan is quick and as I leave, the aid station captain comments on my button-up, lightweight fishing shirt I ' m wearing.
        -At this point, I am a few min behind 30 hr pace, but still feeling good and positive. Hydrating and eating well.
        -There ' s a lush, shady trail that drops down to a creek where I ' m able to dunk my cap and bandana...sweet relief.
        -The switchback climb from the creek bottom is mild at first, not bad, but then becomes exposed in the charred area from previous forest fires.
        -This easy switchback climb turns into a long, steep uphill grade which is punishing..funny how Henry said it "wasn ' t that bad"... Dmitry caught up with me and offered some encouragement.
        -I roll into Robinson Flat (29.7) about 20 min past 30-hr pace and I ' m feeling kinda gassed. Not bad, but getting warm. My weight is dead-on from the start...173lbs. I feel hydrated, but know I need some calories.

        -Claire and friend David are right there to tend to me, though can ' t cross into the aid station area. So, I sit in a chair in the hot sun with a wet towel over head while Claire unlaces my shoes. I wipe feet off and change socks. No blisters despite the dust...amazing. I drink an Ensure over ice, but nothing else really seems palatable. No pizza, nothing really. My calories are still OK from my Clip mix and I ' m taking Hammer gels pretty consistently on the hour. I leave Robinson about 20 min behind 30 hr pace, but know there is lots of downhill where I can make it up.
        -Downhill, yes...onto Dusty Corners (38) where my second crew (buddies Ron & Lawrence) have driven to meet me. This is another long stretch that should be runnable, but now my stomach is not cooperating. Not sloshy as I am taking salt. I just feel nauseous. So I walk as quickly as possibly, but the tummy does not settle. I am not able to drink now like I know I need to.
        -I pull into Dusty Corners and am met by two friends that squeeze my quads while I eat a Slim Jim..thinking the salty, fatty snack would help to settle the stomach. I top off bottles and leave quickly, spending only a couple of min there.
        -This is where I really need to press...I know I have sweet runnable downhill and can make up some time. But I can ' t...I just can ' t get it going...much is exposed and though it ' s not Texas type heat, it is still very warm. I need to run, but my queesy stomach won ' t let me push or drink like I need to. I carry a slow trudge into Last Chance at mile 43.
        -Weigh in at Last Chance shows me 7lbs down....not good...not good at all. Now that I think about it, I haven ' t peed in about 6 hrs. I know I need to sit and push some liquids. I eat some crackers and a half of grilled cheese. I take two salt tabs and drink two full bottles of water. Gabe has passed through quickly looking better than me but stating he does not feel well. Not feeling better, but knowing I have to move....I pull out a few min behind Gabe.
        -OK, so I have about 4 miles of downhill to the river and I run...I run quickly in some spots then walk other sections, bordering on barfing all the while. It gets hotter as I drop deeper into Deadwood Canyon . It is shaded, but no breeze in the canyon makes it pretty stifling. I am slowing and finally hit the swinging bridge. I look below and Dmitry is in the water trying to cool down and ice his legs. I don ' t have the time so I keep on.
        -Arnold Espe from San Antonio catches me on the other side and we begin climbing. He is struggling too. It is smokin ' and I am soaking wet with sweat, yet haven ' t taken a sip of water since Last Chance. I simply cannot drink.
        -The climb up to Devil ' s thumb is 1800 feet in 1.4 miles. It is tough even when you feel good...but I was not and it was brutal. Step, step, step....stop, dry heave...hands on knees....calves are cramping like never before. This was not good.
        -About 2/3 of the way up, Arnold pulled away and Dmitry passed. Two of the safety sweeps pulled in behind me and one stayed with me to the top. I think it took about 1:20 to climb what normally should have taken about 45 min.
        -I arrive at Devil ' s Thumb...I am done...D-O-N- E.....13: 56....I am about 10 min past cutoff and the aid crew is already packing up. I sit briefly, drinking some Sprite and broth. Gabe, Arnold and Dmitry are all in chairs themselves.. .the Texas contingent is toasted. (Matt Crownover from Dallas is the only Texas finisher...25 hrs and change)

        -Arnold and I load into a car with another dropped runner and an aidstation work drives us back to Foresthill. The ride was painful as my legs and hips continued to cramp uncontrollably.
        -Arriving at Foresthill, we hooked up again with Gabe and camped out in front of the aid station. We knew that my wife Clare and my pacers, along with Henry & Janice were all waiting for us to appear at Michigan Bluff. We wandered for a few minutes, then sat down and just waited. The sun had gone down and now the warm pavement actually felt good. I finally wandered over to the aid station and got 2 more bottles of Sprite ingested. A bit later I had the aid station medical weigh me and I was still 4 pounds down.
        -I checked the "drop" list again to find an impressive list of very stout runners (our own Tim Neckar included) that had experienced their own problems and dropped.

        -Claire and my crew/pacers found me at about 10:30pm and were all disappointed, but relieved to see that I was OK.
        -We made our way to the hotel while I ate a cold, 4-hour old cheeseburger and drank more.
        -After a short shower to rinse off the first layer of dirt, I fell into bed for a decent night sleep.

        -Morning came and Claire and I met my crew at Denny ' s for a big breakfast. They left and headed back to Reno and Claire and I proceeded to the Placer High School track. We hooked up with Gabe, Janice, Henry & Dmitry.
        -We gathered our drop bags from the infield, then sat in the only shaded corner of the bleachers watching runners come down Finley and hit the high school track. Turns out, it was estimated to be 103F+ in the canyons the previous day.
        -Watching the runners come in within the last hour of the 30 hour cutoff was amazing and inspirational. It was difficult to watch, however, having stood on the track myself the previous Thursday morning imaginging myself being there to cross the finish line.

        This was an amazing weekend with lots of memories...some good, others disappointing. We try and try and try and despite our efforts, sometimes things do not turn out like we had hoped. But such is life. We learn, we live, we grow...each in our own way from our own experiences.

        Thanks for your interest in support of all of us that represented Texas .

        Stuart Skeeter
        Clear Lake , TX

      • HM Klaff
        Thanks for the report, Stuart. Sorry you didn t reach the ultimate goal, but neither did nearly 50% of those who started. We all know that once the stomach
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the report, Stuart.  Sorry you didn't reach the ultimate goal, but neither did nearly 50% of those who started.  We all know that once the stomach goes bad, there's very little you can do.  And the conditions sounded pretty tough.  Big props for toeing the line!
           
          Best,
           
          Miles

          On Tue, Jun 30, 2009 at 9:35 PM, Stuart Skeeter <runskeeter@...> wrote:


          Here's a brief re-cap of my weekend attempting the Western States 100. This was what I posted to some family & friends, so I'm sorry about the names that many won't recognize....but here goes.


          -Race buzz around Squaw Valley was very cool. Staying 100 yards from the start line was the best.
          -The whole check-in, medical stuff was kinda weird...not bad, just kinda "commercial"?
          -The organization is amazing with everything being executed to near perfection.
          -It was fun spending some time with Gabe Ayson, Henry Hobbs and Dmitry Rozinsky, all from Austin. My wife Claire was able to join me on one of my ultra road trips and and crew for the first time.

          -Sat morning alarm clock chimes at 3:15...wow, that's early. Restless night for sure.
          -The electricity at the start is very cool. The lights lining the ski slope have their orangy glow.
          -I am standing here at the start thinking "I am REALLY here..this is WS and I deserve having a bib number."
          -The countdown, the shotgun blast...I glance back and Claire snaps one more early pic.
          -The climb to Escarpment (3.5 mi) went really well...55 min. Not as bad as I'd imagined.
          -We crest at the top and I stop to look over my right shoulder.... what a glorius sunrise..."this is the day...."
          -I fall into the conga line at a nice pace as we roll through the upper tundra....it is cool and lovely.
          -This sweet rolling downhill singletrack rolls along and pace is solid. Matt Crownover from Dallas passes and is moving swiftly.
          -Lyon Ridge aid (10.5) is the first stop and I'm right on pace...feeling great, simply topping off bottles.
          -The trail is simply beautiful......lots of wildflowers.

          -Rolling into Red Star (16), the dusty trails lead you down through old growth pine forests with flourescent green moss.
          -Red Star is good, quick for an Ensure and chat with Gabe & Dmitry. I need some of Dmitry's sunscreen. Pace still OK.
          -This stretch is loooonnnng...but very pretty and very exposed. I turn my cap sideways, gangsta style to keep sun from scorching the left side of my face.
          -On to Duncan Canyon where it rolls along ridgelines with awesome views and beautiful flowers.
          -Descent into Duncan Canyon is fairly steep and very dusty...both quads and lungs are burning.
          -Aid at Duncan is quick and as I leave, the aid station captain comments on my button-up, lightweight fishing shirt I'm wearing.
          -At this point, I am a few min behind 30 hr pace, but still feeling good and positive. Hydrating and eating well.
          -There's a lush, shady trail that drops down to a creek where I'm able to dunk my cap and bandana...sweet relief.
          -The switchback climb from the creek bottom is mild at first, not bad, but then becomes exposed in the charred area from previous forest fires.
          -This easy switchback climb turns into a long, steep uphill grade which is punishing..funny how Henry said it "wasn't that bad"... Dmitry caught up with me and offered some encouragement.
          -I roll into Robinson Flat (29.7) about 20 min past 30-hr pace and I'm feeling kinda gassed. Not bad, but getting warm. My weight is dead-on from the start...173lbs. I feel hydrated, but know I need some calories.

          -Claire and friend David are right there to tend to me, though can't cross into the aid station area. So, I sit in a chair in the hot sun with a wet towel over head while Claire unlaces my shoes. I wipe feet off and change socks. No blisters despite the dust...amazing. I drink an Ensure over ice, but nothing else really seems palatable. No pizza, nothing really. My calories are still OK from my Clip mix and I'm taking Hammer gels pretty consistently on the hour. I leave Robinson about 20 min behind 30 hr pace, but know there is lots of downhill where I can make it up.
          -Downhill, yes...onto Dusty Corners (38) where my second crew (buddies Ron & Lawrence) have driven to meet me. This is another long stretch that should be runnable, but now my stomach is not cooperating. Not sloshy as I am taking salt. I just feel nauseous. So I walk as quickly as possibly, but the tummy does not settle. I am not able to drink now like I know I need to.
          -I pull into Dusty Corners and am met by two friends that squeeze my quads while I eat a Slim Jim..thinking the salty, fatty snack would help to settle the stomach. I top off bottles and leave quickly, spending only a couple of min there.
          -This is where I really need to press...I know I have sweet runnable downhill and can make up some time. But I can't...I just can't get it going...much is exposed and though it's not Texas type heat, it is still very warm. I need to run, but my queesy stomach won't let me push or drink like I need to. I carry a slow trudge into Last Chance at mile 43.
          -Weigh in at Last Chance shows me 7lbs down....not good...not good at all. Now that I think about it, I haven't peed in about 6 hrs. I know I need to sit and push some liquids. I eat some crackers and a half of grilled cheese. I take two salt tabs and drink two full bottles of water. Gabe has passed through quickly looking better than me but stating he does not feel well. Not feeling better, but knowing I have to move....I pull out a few min behind Gabe.
          -OK, so I have about 4 miles of downhill to the river and I run...I run quickly in some spots then walk other sections, bordering on barfing all the while. It gets hotter as I drop deeper into Deadwood Canyon. It is shaded, but no breeze in the canyon makes it pretty stifling. I am slowing and finally hit the swinging bridge. I look below and Dmitry is in the water trying to cool down and ice his legs. I don't have the time so I keep on.
          -Arnold Espe from San Antonio catches me on the other side and we begin climbing. He is struggling too. It is smokin' and I am soaking wet with sweat, yet haven't taken a sip of water since Last Chance. I simply cannot drink.
          -The climb up to Devil's thumb is 1800 feet in 1.4 miles. It is tough even when you feel good...but I was not and it was brutal. Step, step, step....stop, dry heave...hands on knees....calves are cramping like never before. This was not good.
          -About 2/3 of the way up, Arnold pulled away and Dmitry passed. Two of the safety sweeps pulled in behind me and one stayed with me to the top. I think it took about 1:20 to climb what normally should have taken about 45 min.
          -I arrive at Devil's Thumb...I am done...D-O-N-E.....13:56....I am about 10 min past cutoff and the aid crew is already packing up. I sit briefly, drinking some Sprite and broth. Gabe, Arnold and Dmitry are all in chairs themselves...the Texas contingent is toasted. (Matt Crownover from Dallas is the only Texas finisher...25 hrs and change)

          -Arnold and I load into a car with another dropped runner and an aidstation work drives us back to Foresthill. The ride was painful as my legs and hips continued to cramp uncontrollably.
          -Arriving at Foresthill, we hooked up again with Gabe and camped out in front of the aid station. We knew that my wife Clare and my pacers, along with Henry & Janice were all waiting for us to appear at Michigan Bluff. We wandered for a few minutes, then sat down and just waited. The sun had gone down and now the warm pavement actually felt good. I finally wandered over to the aid station and got 2 more bottles of Sprite ingested. A bit later I had the aid station medical weigh me and I was still 4 pounds down.
          -I checked the "drop" list again to find an impressive list of very stout runners (our own Tim Neckar included) that had experienced their own problems and dropped.

          -Claire and my crew/pacers found me at about 10:30pm and were all disappointed, but relieved to see that I was OK.
          -We made our way to the hotel while I ate a cold, 4-hour old cheeseburger and drank more.
          -After a short shower to rinse off the first layer of dirt, I fell into bed for a decent night sleep.

          -Morning came and Claire and I met my crew at Denny's for a big breakfast. They left and headed back to Reno and Claire and I proceeded to the Placer High School track. We hooked up with Gabe, Janice, Henry & Dmitry.
          -We gathered our drop bags from the infield, then sat in the only shaded corner of the bleachers watching runners come down Finley and hit the high school track. Turns out, it was estimated to be 103F+ in the canyons the previous day.
          -Watching the runners come in within the last hour of the 30 hour cutoff was amazing and inspirational. It was difficult to watch, however, having stood on the track myself the previous Thursday morning imaginging myself being there to cross the finish line.

          This was an amazing weekend with lots of memories...some good, others disappointing. We try and try and try and despite our efforts, sometimes things do not turn out like we had hoped. But such is life. We learn, we live, we grow...each in our own way from our own experiences.

          Thanks for your interest in support of all of us that represented Texas.

          Stuart Skeeter
          Clear Lake, TX


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