Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Charles Aznavour and Negros

Expand Messages
  • Utilisateur1
    Hi all, I recently heard on a french radio that in his youth Charles Aznavour used to visit very often the manouches in the zone, to listen to their music,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all,



      I recently heard on a french radio that in his youth Charles Aznavour used to visit very often the manouches in the zone, to listen to their music, especially Joseph Reinhardt. He was an unsuccessful songwriter at that time and he was considering stopping his artistic career and looking for a 'serious' job, and it was Django's mother, Negros, who foretold him that he would eventually meet the success. She did not used the lines of the hand (she did not believe in that) for that, she told him he was like the god Mercure, the god of thieves, but that he was not a thief, just a smart fellow and that he will succeed. Of course, shortly after he had his first hit. Charles Aznavour wrote a few songs for Edith Piaf too.



      Best



      François RAVEZ

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: westsidemaurice
      To: gypsyjazzguitar@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2003 11:29 PM
      Subject: GJG News Re: Edith Piaf Hymne à l'Amour


      François: You tell a breathtakingly good tale. Thank you.

      Maurice (John)


      --- In gypsyjazzguitar@yahoogroups.com, "Utilisateur1"
      <Francois.Ravez@w...> wrote:
      > Hi John (aka Momo)
      >
      > I don't know if Django and Edith Piaf were "close" or not. I
      believe that if Django
      > has accepted that the central subject of this photo could be his
      crippled hand, it shows in some way
      > a certain degree of confidence in Edith Piaf. I think both had more
      in common that you may think.
      > First they both were born very poor and had to maintain their
      family since they were kids, Edith Piaf
      > used to play some banjo (while singing) in order to get something
      to eat just like Django did
      > (and Stéphane and Henri Crolla had to play in the backyards too).
      > Remember that Edith Piaf (born Giovanna Gassion, daughter of a
      street acrobat) was born in the
      > street, on a policeman's cape, (on the steps of what is now a
      Turkish Take-away restaurant
      > at n° 72, of the popular rue de Belleville).
      > Django and Edith did not have to play a part in front of each
      other, they knew exactly where they both were coming from
      > (and did not want to go back there).
      > It is easy to guess what would have been Edith and Django's lives
      without their incredible gifts for music :
      > probably Edith would have become a prostitute and may be Django a
      little thief or a pimp or a chair bottomer.
      > Instead they both could afford the best places in Paris. For
      instance Edith Piaf hired the 'Balajo' to organize a huge
      > birthday party for Marcel Cerdan. Django was also a regular
      customer of the 'Balajo' where he spent money
      > in Champagne just like if the money ("les lovés" in manouche slang)
      was burning his fingers and if the dreamed duo
      > between Edith and Django ever happened it possibly was there.
      >
      > Edith's musical interests ranged from jazz (she sang a french
      version of Night and Day and a thrilling
      > "blues" called "Je t'ai dans la peau") to ethnic folk (vals criollo
      from Argentine "La Foule") [OK I agree no swing]
      > If you ever heard the beautiful waltz by francis Alfred Moerman
      (called "Petite Valse Manouche") it is exactly
      > the same song as Edith Piaf's "Fais-moi Valser". She had Matelo
      Ferret to back her on guitar on her first recordings.
      > Edith's main musical genre was derived from the "Chanson réaliste"
      a tradition of sad songs about the ones who have
      > gone wrong, who have gone to the bad. Such songs are often
      ridiculous, but when they are sung by Edith Piaf
      > they are not. Because of her sincerity, because that could have
      been the story of her life for real.
      > Personally I feel the same kind of emotion when I hear Edith Piaf
      singing that when I hear Billie Holiday.
      >
      > I believe she was more identified with the resistance than with
      collaboration, and helped some jewish people
      > like songwriter Michel Emer to escape from the nazis.
      >
      > It is true that she sang songs about the 'Légion étrangère' ("Mon
      Légionnaire", "Le Fanion de la Légion") and
      > the "Colonial (troops)" in the fifties that now have some
      unpleasant colonialist flavour (but let us be honest, it
      > was a general feeling then in France except among the communists,
      and in these songs the colonialist soldiers
      > in a most premonitory way always loose in the end).
      > Now Edith Piaf liked the soldiers, especially the ones from
      the "Légion étrangère" and the "colonial (troops)".
      > It has nothing to do with politics, it traces back to the days when
      her acrobat father was performing near the
      > Versailles barracks where they stationed. These soldiers used to be
      generous when her father and her were
      > going round with the hat. This knowledge of the good places for
      begging was a trick leagued by her father
      > (certainly the only thing he left her).
      > So she developped a taste for the soldiers (especially from the
      Légion and the Coloniale).
      > Edith had no interest in politics, her main interests wer music and
      love (she was a maneater).
      >
      > I believe that you cannot blame people who have suffered from
      extreme poverty and finally got through and made
      > a wealthy position for not wanting to share their money with
      everybody. Django who had the same background
      > felt as little concerned as Edith about politics.
      >
      > Edith Piaf came to New-York various times with Marcel Cerdan
      (including for the world championship against
      > US boxer Tony Zale on 20 sept 1948). She was in New-York when
      Marcel Cerdan's plane crashed (28 oct 1949).
      > When she heard of his death she did not cancel her 'tour de chant'
      and sang this very night at the'Versailles' in NY.
      >
      > Edith Piaf died on 14 october 1963. The day after, Jean Cocteau a
      long time friend of her died while he was
      > preparing to eulogize her on the radio. Edith was buried in the
      Père-Lachaise cementery, followed by 40 000
      > parisians. Marlene Dietrich who was there gazed at the crowd and
      said "How they loved her!".
      >
      > Best
      >
      > François RAVEZ
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: westsidemaurice
      > To: gypsyjazzguitar@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2003 4:27 PM
      > Subject: GJG News Re: Edith Piaf Hymne à l'Amour
      >
      >
      > I doubt Piaf was "close" with Django simply because the hand
      photo is
      > so obviously contrived (just look at it). If they were "close" I
      > doubt they'd have posed that way, though he clearly did for
      publicity
      > reasons...she was a bigger star than he was. Kind of like the
      > pictures of Nixon shaking hands with James Brown :-)
      >
      > Not much evidence of his range of musical interests in her music
      > either, from what I've heard: no swing, jazz, ethnic folk. On top
      of
      > that, she seemed more sympathetic toward the "right" ...I've seen
      no
      > hint of interest by her in Eastern Europe's music or the
      slaughter of
      > gypsies or Jews by Vichy.
      >
      > In the early fifties she was identified popularly with the
      > paramilitary that moved to seize Paris by force. She was an
      ignorant
      > nativist/nationalist (LePen, Pat Buchanan, and other right-
      wingers
      > rely on people with that sentiment)... by definition gypsies are
      > 180degrees from that.
      >
      > I think her music is fun, but it's mostly sappy emotional
      campfire
      > stuff. Like most popular music.
      >
      > Maurice
      >
      > --- In gypsyjazzguitar@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Baxter"
      > <rogersbaxter@b...> wrote:
      > > I have seen film footage that indicates Piaf was in New York
      with
      > > Cerdan at the same time but it is unclear whether she actually
      met
      > > Django whilst she was there.
      > >
      > > There is no indication that Django and Piaf were ever in any
      way
      > > close; the hand inspection photo was almost certainly a
      publicity
      > > shot. However, it is quite possible Django accompanied her on
      an ad
      > > hoc basis in a night club somewhere in paris at some time.
      > >
      > > Roger
      > >
      > > --- In gypsyjazzguitar@yahoogroups.com, "Utilisateur1"
      > > <Francois.Ravez@w...> wrote:
      > > > Salut Momo,
      > > >
      > > > There is a link between Django and Edith Piaf, and this link
      is
      > not
      > > musical at all.
      > > > This link is a man named is Marcel Cerdan (a well-known
      boxer).
      > > Some of you certainly recall
      > > > that during his US Tour, Django missed the beginning of the
      show
      > > with Duke
      > > > Ellington because he had met Marcel Cerdan in New-York.
      > > > Marcel Cerdan was Edith's great love from 1945 to 1949 when
      he
      > died
      > > in a
      > > > plane crash in the Azores islands.
      > > > She dedicated him a song that is considered as may be one of
      the
      > > most beautiful
      > > > french love songs (it is one I can't hear without having a
      cold
      > > shiver going down my back)
      > > > which is called 'Hymne à l'Amour' (Anthem to Love) :
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
      >
      >
      > Email>webmaster@g...
      > Website>www.gypsyjazzguitar.com
      > eGroup>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gypsyjazzguitar
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
      Service.
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


      Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      ADVERTISEMENT




      Email>webmaster@...
      Website>www.gypsyjazzguitar.com
      eGroup>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gypsyjazzguitar



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.