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question about floods in basement

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  • beachbodytan2002
    Hello, I m Rose, I was never interested in ground water, until now. Our house that we just got last year, after winter was ending and spring was beginning,
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 2, 2007
      Hello,

      I'm Rose, I was never interested in ground water, until now. Our
      house that we just got last year, after winter was ending and spring
      was beginning, we started to get water in the basement. The only
      reason the basement didn't fill up was because I have two strong sump
      pumps (which I never know anything about) plugged in at all times,
      and during this time of year, the pumps run 24/7 for 6 weeks
      straight. I had the walls patched up and some cracks in the basement,
      but it seems like the water found or made new cracks to get in.
      after the 6 week water period, we got mold, we also had mold in the
      apartment too. then lots of wetness on the walls in both basement
      and apartment. I had vents put in. and a dehumidifier in the
      basement turned on at all times. Now I don't know if any of this is
      going to solve our water problem until, winter ends & springs begins
      again. that's when all the snow melts and the underground water
      level is high. I believe, because I was told there was an
      underground stream or river or springs under this house. that sounds
      correct due to all the water those two pumps pump during that time of
      year. (my neighbor said that's not true but the water level is very
      high) causing our house/basement to flood.

      Would anyone recommend anything else that I can try besides "moving"
      to stop the water from coming into the basement?

      Thanks
      Rose
    • nfitz170
      ... sounds ... of ... Your neighbour is mostly likely correct. Underground streams and rivers tend to be just as much of a myth as unicorns - unless your
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 4, 2007
        --- In gwmodel@yahoogroups.com, "beachbodytan2002"
        <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:
        >
        > ... I believe, because I was told there was an
        > underground stream or river or springs under this house. that
        sounds
        > correct due to all the water those two pumps pump during that time
        of
        > year. (my neighbor said that's not true but the water level is very
        > high) causing our house/basement to flood.

        Your neighbour is mostly likely correct. Underground streams and
        rivers tend to be just as much of a myth as unicorns - unless your
        house is built in a most unique place.

        > Would anyone recommend anything else that I can try besides "moving"
        > to stop the water from coming into the basement?

        Everying is site-specific. Where is your house (geologically
        speaking)? Is it at a bottom of a hill? Was the basement
        constructed by blasting it into bedrock? How far from groundsurface
        to bedrock? Do you see springs anywhere near the house? Where is
        the nearest surface water body? Which direction does groundwater
        flow? Do you have soil descriptions for the 10 metres or so from
        groundsurface down?

        Best thing to do is to talk to a professional in your area who is
        well-versed with the local geology. He can likely tell you a lot
        more in 5-minutes just looking at a topographic map than you'll get
        here.
      • Niels Hartog
        Dear Rose, I m assuming you have a concrete basement. You don t need to learn anything about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your problem you just
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
          Dear Rose,

          I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't need to learn anything
          about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your problem you just need
          to know how to get rid of the leaks in your basement. There are special
          products for that in your local home hardware store that will help you find
          and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting your money on a
          detailed hydrological study.

          Best Regards,
          Niels


          [ http://www.nielshartog.nlhttp://www.linkedin.com/in/niels ]
        • Rose
          Dear Niels, that sounds too simple, another person wrote me saying I have to hire a contractor to dig a drench around the house, put drain pipes at the bottom
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
            Dear Niels,

            that sounds too simple, another person wrote me saying I have to hire a contractor to dig a drench around the house, put drain pipes at the bottom of the basement level, then again at the top (roof) of the basement all around the house, then put gravel around. this expense will start at 10,000.00 (he said) which I don't have. I do have a concrete basement. I will try what you suggested because I don't have a choice to do the other.

            thank you
            Rose


            Niels Hartog <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
            Dear Rose,

            I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't need to learn anything
            about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your problem you just need
            to know how to get rid of the leaks in your basement. There are special
            products for that in your local home hardware store that will help you find
            and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting your money on a
            detailed hydrological study.

            Best Regards,
            Niels


            [ http://www.nielshartog.nl — http://www.linkedin.com/in/niels ]
          • Rose
            Thanks, we do live in an area with lots of creeks which they are approx 2 minutes in walking distance from this house.. I wish I knew about basement flooding
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
              Thanks, we do live in an area with lots of creeks which they are approx 2 minutes in walking distance from this house.. I wish I knew about basement flooding before I bought this house. Seems like the people here are so use to this (except me) and expect water in their basements during "flood season" That's what they call it here. (flood season) summer, fall, winter - Flood season - spring.

              I had someone check it out and talk about things you spoke of. Sounds like the water (is traveling) from a distance away cuts through (underground) our home and the one across the street and continues. (he even spoke about picturing a sponge that is full, the extra water that the sponge (ground) can't hold goes into the basement (empty space) to fill up with water.

              I've never ever heard of anything like that. My yard can be bone dry, but the basement is flooded with two sump pumps working full time. the water pumping out is like an open fire hydrant. I guess there isn't a way to detour this water. The home inspector didn't even pick this up when I hired him to look at the house. he said this basement is in great condition and no signs of mold. But the sellers had a dehumidifier down there and took it out during the inspection. When I put one down there after the "flood season" was over. I couldn't believe how well a dehumidifier works. it dried up the cement all around the basement and you can't ever tell there was a flood. My basement now looks like you can turn it into an apartment. but during "flood season" it looks like a built in pool that you can dive into. I can't do expensive work like dig a drence and put pipes around the house. another wrote that would start at 10,000 dollars. another one wrote, Just get more cement and re- cement the basement so the water doesn't get in through cracks. I guess I'll try that.

              thanks for responding with your advice.
              Rose


              nfitz170 <nfitz@...> wrote:
              --- In gwmodel@yahoogroups.com, "beachbodytan2002"
              <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:
              >
              > ... I believe, because I was told there was an
              > underground stream or river or springs under this house. that
              sounds
              > correct due to all the water those two pumps pump during that time
              of
              > year. (my neighbor said that's not true but the water level is very
              > high) causing our house/basement to flood.

              Your neighbour is mostly likely correct. Underground streams and
              rivers tend to be just as much of a myth as unicorns - unless your
              house is built in a most unique place.

              > Would anyone recommend anything else that I can try besides "moving"
              > to stop the water from coming into the basement?

              Everying is site-specific. Where is your house (geologically
              speaking)? Is it at a bottom of a hill? Was the basement
              constructed by blasting it into bedrock? How far from groundsurface
              to bedrock? Do you see springs anywhere near the house? Where is
              the nearest surface water body? Which direction does groundwater
              flow? Do you have soil descriptions for the 10 metres or so from
              groundsurface down?

              Best thing to do is to talk to a professional in your area who is
              well-versed with the local geology. He can likely tell you a lot
              more in 5-minutes just looking at a topographic map than you'll get
              here.
            • Lanya Ross
              Rose, I apologize if you ve already gotten this advice: There are additional small-scale projects that MIGHT help your situation (in addition to sealing cracks
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
                Rose,

                I apologize if you've already gotten this advice:

                There are additional small-scale projects that MIGHT
                help your situation (in addition to sealing cracks in
                your cement basement). They may or may not work,
                depending on the site-specific details of your lot.

                First, make sure the gutters and downspouts are clean.
                If they overflow, water falls onto the ground and
                sinks in immediately next to your foundation.

                During the next rain or snowmelt, check to see if
                runoff is flowing toward your house. Maybe your (or
                your neighbors') gutters are moving water onto your
                yard near your foundation. You may be able to direct
                water to flow past your house instead of sinking into
                your yard. Make sure that gutters direct water away
                from your house; downspouts should be directed at
                least six feet away from your basement walls.

                You may also have problems if your yard (or your
                neighbors' yards) slopes toward your house. Your yard
                could be re-graded slightly to redirect water away
                from the house. Make sure the ground slopes gently
                away from the exterior walls of your home for a
                minimum of six feet. You could also consider
                soft-surface landscaping (like a rain garden) that
                allows stormwater to soak into the ground away from
                your home.

                Good luck!
                Lanya Ross


                -- Rose <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:

                > Dear Niels,
                >
                > that sounds too simple, another person wrote me
                > saying I have to hire a contractor to dig a drench
                > around the house, put drain pipes at the bottom of
                > the basement level, then again at the top (roof) of
                > the basement all around the house, then put gravel
                > around. this expense will start at 10,000.00 (he
                > said) which I don't have. I do have a concrete
                > basement. I will try what you suggested because I
                > don't have a choice to do the other.
                >
                > thank you
                > Rose
                >
                >
                > Niels Hartog <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
                > Dear Rose,
                >
                > I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't
                > need to learn anything
                > about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve
                > your problem you just need
                > to know how to get rid of the leaks in your
                > basement. There are special
                > products for that in your local home hardware store
                > that will help you find
                > and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting
                > your money on a
                > detailed hydrological study.
                >
                > Best Regards,
                > Niels
              • Patrick
                Rose, Although the recommendation to put in the drain around the outside of your basement is accurate there are other much cheaper alternatives that might be
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
                  Rose,
                  Although the recommendation to put in the drain around the outside of
                  your basement is accurate there are other much cheaper alternatives
                  that might be enough to eliminate your problem.

                  Make sure all rain water is diverted away from your house. Route all
                  gutters a good distance from the structure and perferably down slope
                  from the house. Also countour and grade the soil so that it drains
                  away from the house. Most of the problems that you describe are from
                  poor drainage. These modifications can be done very easily and will
                  minimize the water that enters the house.

                  There are products as mentioned (DriLock is one) which can be painted
                  on the walls to prevent any remaining seepage.

                  Follow link it pretty much says the same thing I just did:
                  http://ph.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070628141319AAWnAqf



                  --- In gwmodel@yahoogroups.com, Rose <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Niels,
                  >
                  > that sounds too simple, another person wrote me saying I have to
                  hire a contractor to dig a drench around the house, put drain pipes
                  at the bottom of the basement level, then again at the top (roof) of
                  the basement all around the house, then put gravel around. this
                  expense will start at 10,000.00 (he said) which I don't have. I do
                  have a concrete basement. I will try what you suggested because I
                  don't have a choice to do the other.
                  >
                  > thank you
                  > Rose
                  >
                  >
                  > Niels Hartog <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
                  > Dear Rose,
                  >
                  > I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't need to learn
                  anything
                  > about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your problem you
                  just need
                  > to know how to get rid of the leaks in your basement. There are
                  special
                  > products for that in your local home hardware store that will help
                  you find
                  > and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting your money on a
                  > detailed hydrological study.
                  >
                  > Best Regards,
                  > Niels
                  >
                  >
                  > [ http://www.nielshartog.nl — http://www.linkedin.com/in/niels ]
                  >
                • GEOREGON@aol.com
                  RE. WATER INTO BASEMENT AS STATED -- in letter -- hydrologic study not needed -- BUT -- it is good to collect some data to be able to understand all the
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
                    RE. WATER INTO BASEMENT

                    AS STATED -- in letter -- hydrologic study not needed -- BUT -- it is
                    good to collect some data to be able to understand all the possible things that
                    may happen.

                    !. Sealing at the inside of a concrete wall does not always stop the leaks.
                    (Water rises up or goes laterally to find new "weak" spot.)

                    2. Establishing 2 or 3 piezometers around the upslope side (the direction
                    from which the water in the ground is coming toward the wall) -- will allow
                    the height or head of water behind (and upslope of) the wall to be monitored.

                    3. The effective of sealing/draining - if sump pump used- - can thus be
                    determined.

                    4. If the area of leakage into the basement can be isolated - it may only
                    be necessary to dig short distance
                    outside the wall to reach the area requiring sealing. (Sealing could then be
                    done inside and outside the wall.)

                    5. I have used 12 volt boat bilge pumps -- requiring a small Radio Shack
                    transformer @ +/- $12.95 - to drain rather significant leaks into basements.
                    (Use pump with float switch) -- System cost +/- $70.00..

                    Write if have more questions --

                    Georegon
                  • nfitz170
                    ... The guy has two strong sump pumps running 24/7 for 6 weeks and you think that you can solve the problem with a can of sealer? Gosh, I hope that s not how
                    Message 9 of 14 , Nov 5, 2007
                      --- In gwmodel@yahoogroups.com, "Niels Hartog" <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't need to learn
                      > anything about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your
                      > problem you just need to know how to get rid of the leaks in your
                      > basement. There are special products for that in your local home
                      > hardware store that will help you find and seal leaks. Ask there for
                      > advice, before wasting your money on a detailed hydrological study.

                      The guy has two strong sump pumps running 24/7 for 6 weeks and you
                      think that you can solve the problem with a can of sealer? Gosh, I
                      hope that's not how they fix the dykes these days. Perhaps he can
                      stick his finger in after the sealer fails.

                      I didn't suggest spending money on a detailed hydrological (or surely
                      hydrogeological would be more appropriate) study. I suggested asking
                      someone local who would know 5-minute of questions. Everyone else
                      abuses professionals in this way - most hydrogeologists I know you'd
                      have a hard time shutting up after 5 minutes of describing local
                      conditions ... :-)
                    • Rose
                      Hi George, thank you for responding. A contractor did do # 1 and what you said happened. the water found another weak spot and got in. I feel like I m
                      Message 10 of 14 , Nov 6, 2007
                        Hi George,

                        thank you for responding. A contractor did do # 1 and what you said happened. the water found another weak spot and got in. I feel like I'm playing a chess game with water and I always get check mate. (water gets in another way) I'm just shocked by how fast and how much the water comes in. Thanks for sharing the information with # 5 as well as all the information you posted. I never experienced anything like this, ever. And I can't believe how involved this is to stop this water, If I don't keep up with it, we will have another "fried furnace". I had to replace one already along with the electric box & wires. The water was up to the ceiling. This is not like a broken pipe that I can turn off the valve till the plumber comes. I was told during heavy rains, check on the basement. I didn't know they have alarms to warn me. I'm slowly
                        learning 'basics' with keeping up with the house, so this is extreme for me and scary. Everybody is giving such helpful advice, so when I get the chance to speak with a contractor, I'll have some ideas on what to say.

                        thank you again
                        Rose


                        GEOREGON@... wrote:
                        RE. WATER INTO BASEMENT

                        AS STATED -- in letter -- hydrologic study not needed -- BUT -- it is
                        good to collect some data to be able to understand all the possible things that
                        may happen.

                        !. Sealing at the inside of a concrete wall does not always stop the leaks.
                        (Water rises up or goes laterally to find new "weak" spot.)

                        2. Establishing 2 or 3 piezometers around the upslope side (the direction
                        from which the water in the ground is coming toward the wall) -- will allow
                        the height or head of water behind (and upslope of) the wall to be monitored.

                        3. The effective of sealing/draining - if sump pump used- - can thus be
                        determined.

                        4. If the area of leakage into the basement can be isolated - it may only
                        be necessary to dig short distance
                        outside the wall to reach the area requiring sealing. (Sealing could then be
                        done inside and outside the wall.)

                        5. I have used 12 volt boat bilge pumps -- requiring a small Radio Shack
                        transformer @ +/- $12.95 - to drain rather significant leaks into basements.
                        (Use pump with float switch) -- System cost +/- $70.00..

                        Write if have more questions --

                        Georegon
                      • Rose
                        Dear Patrick I ll WILL start with this. you wrote
                        Message 11 of 14 , Nov 6, 2007
                          Dear Patrick

                          I'll WILL start with this. you wrote <<<make sure all water is diverted away form the house. Route all gutters a good distance from the structure>>> I just saw that this house doesn't have any gutters. (another thing the home inspector didn't tell me). This house is also one floor, so maybe I can install this myself. We are on a strict budget and can't afford the appropriate way to fix this problem which I was told cost start at $10,000 which would never happen when raising two young children by myself and only on my income.. Off topic, but I wish I can make the home inspector responsible, because in his report he said the basement is in very good shape and no signs of water damage. hummm. should of talked to my neighbor first, during "flood time" he would come over to check on us to see if we were OK and needed any help with the pumps. It was the fire dept that told me which ones to buy and how to work them. right now, we are dry and OK. rain is OK too. we didn't get any snow yet, but when we do, and towards the end of winter just before spring when the snow melts. The two pumps run 24/7 for about 6 weeks and I still have ankle deep water in the basement. 'even with both pumps pumping'. I have to check on it several times a day & night to make sure it doesn't come up too high to fry the furnace *again.

                          Thanks again for your time to respond to my post,
                          got lots of good ideas,
                          Rose


                          Patrick <ptara@...> wrote:
                          Rose,
                          Although the recommendation to put in the drain around the outside of
                          your basement is accurate there are other much cheaper alternatives
                          that might be enough to eliminate your problem.

                          Make sure all rain water is diverted away from your house. Route all
                          gutters a good distance from the structure and perferably down slope
                          from the house. Also countour and grade the soil so that it drains
                          away from the house. Most of the problems that you describe are from
                          poor drainage. These modifications can be done very easily and will
                          minimize the water that enters the house.

                          There are products as mentioned (DriLock is one) which can be painted
                          on the walls to prevent any remaining seepage.

                          Follow link it pretty much says the same thing I just did:
                          http://ph.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070628141319AAWnAqf

                          --- In gwmodel@yahoogroups.com, Rose <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Dear Niels,
                          >
                          > that sounds too simple, another person wrote me saying I have to
                          hire a contractor to dig a drench around the house, put drain pipes
                          at the bottom of the basement level, then again at the top (roof) of
                          the basement all around the house, then put gravel around. this
                          expense will start at 10,000.00 (he said) which I don't have. I do
                          have a concrete basement. I will try what you suggested because I
                          don't have a choice to do the other.
                          >
                          > thank you
                          > Rose
                          >
                          >
                          > Niels Hartog <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
                          > Dear Rose,
                          >
                          > I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't need to learn
                          anything
                          > about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve your problem you
                          just need
                          > to know how to get rid of the leaks in your basement. There are
                          special
                          > products for that in your local home hardware store that will help
                          you find
                          > and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting your money on a
                          > detailed hydrological study.
                          >
                          > Best Regards,
                          > Niels
                        • Rose
                          Hi Mr. Ross, You are the 3rd person to write me saying check the gutters and direct them away from the house. I now see we don t have any gutters on the roof
                          Message 12 of 14 , Nov 6, 2007
                            Hi Mr. Ross,

                            You are the 3rd person to write me saying check the gutters and direct them away from the house. I now see we don't have any gutters on the roof of the house at all.

                            Sounds like this would make a difference, I'll try to install them myself. this house is only one floor. our homes are spaced far from each other. their water is not running into our yard. Another amazing thing is when the snow melts, we don't have puddles in our yard. the ground absorbs the water. Also, when the snow is all melted, the yard is dry, water is still getting into the basement (I was told till the water levels drop) and if finds its way in through the cracks in the basement floor, or where the basement wall and floor meet (in two spots). BUT, it got to get in from places I haven't seen due to the size of that crack (small) and the amount of water (ankle deep) with both pumps pumping. Your post sounds hopeful and not a Hugh price to eliminate some of the water.

                            thanks!


                            Lanya Ross <buffalomadness@...> wrote:
                            Rose,

                            I apologize if you've already gotten this advice:

                            There are additional small-scale projects that MIGHT
                            help your situation (in addition to sealing cracks in
                            your cement basement). They may or may not work,
                            depending on the site-specific details of your lot.

                            First, make sure the gutters and downspouts are clean.
                            If they overflow, water falls onto the ground and
                            sinks in immediately next to your foundation.

                            During the next rain or snowmelt, check to see if
                            runoff is flowing toward your house. Maybe your (or
                            your neighbors') gutters are moving water onto your
                            yard near your foundation. You may be able to direct
                            water to flow past your house instead of sinking into
                            your yard. Make sure that gutters direct water away
                            from your house; downspouts should be directed at
                            least six feet away from your basement walls.

                            You may also have problems if your yard (or your
                            neighbors' yards) slopes toward your house. Your yard
                            could be re-graded slightly to redirect water away
                            from the house. Make sure the ground slopes gently
                            away from the exterior walls of your home for a
                            minimum of six feet. You could also consider
                            soft-surface landscaping (like a rain garden) that
                            allows stormwater to soak into the ground away from
                            your home.

                            Good luck!
                            Lanya Ross

                            -- Rose <beachbodytan2002@...> wrote:

                            > Dear Niels,
                            >
                            > that sounds too simple, another person wrote me
                            > saying I have to hire a contractor to dig a drench
                            > around the house, put drain pipes at the bottom of
                            > the basement level, then again at the top (roof) of
                            > the basement all around the house, then put gravel
                            > around. this expense will start at 10,000.00 (he
                            > said) which I don't have. I do have a concrete
                            > basement. I will try what you suggested because I
                            > don't have a choice to do the other.
                            >
                            > thank you
                            > Rose
                            >
                            >
                            > Niels Hartog <niels.hartog@...> wrote:
                            > Dear Rose,
                            >
                            > I'm assuming you have a concrete basement. You don't
                            > need to learn anything
                            > about groundwater to solve your problem. To solve
                            > your problem you just need
                            > to know how to get rid of the leaks in your
                            > basement. There are special
                            > products for that in your local home hardware store
                            > that will help you find
                            > and seal leaks. Ask there for advice, before wasting
                            > your money on a
                            > detailed hydrological study.
                            >
                            > Best Regards,
                            > Niels
                          • henryf@gly.fsu.edu
                            Uh Rose...... Where do you live? Water up to the ceiling? Are you on city water? Are you sure that you are not close to a broken main?
                            Message 13 of 14 , Nov 6, 2007
                              Uh Rose......

                              Where do you live?

                              Water up to the ceiling?

                              Are you on city water? Are you sure that you are not close to a
                              broken main?


                              On 6 Nov 2007 at 4:25, Rose wrote:

                              > Hi George,
                              >
                              > thank you for responding. A contractor did do # 1 and what you
                              > said happened. the water found another weak spot and got in. I
                              > feel like I'm playing a chess game with water and I always get check
                              > mate. (water gets in another way) I'm just shocked by how fast and
                              > how much the water comes in. Thanks for sharing the information
                              > with # 5 as well as all the information you posted. I never
                              > experienced anything like this, ever. And I can't believe how
                              > involved this is to stop this water, If I don't keep up with it, we
                              > will have another "fried furnace". I had to replace one already
                              > along with the electric box & wires. The water was up to the
                              > ceiling. This is not like a broken pipe that I can turn off the
                              > valve till the plumber comes. I was told during heavy rains, check
                              > on the basement. I didn't know they have alarms to warn me. I'm
                              > slowly
                              > learning 'basics' with keeping up with the house, so this is extreme
                              > for me and scary. Everybody is giving such helpful advice, so when
                              > I get the chance to speak with a contractor, I'll have some ideas on
                              > what to say.
                              >
                              > thank you again
                              > Rose
                              >
                              >
                              > GEOREGON@... wrote:
                              > RE. WATER INTO BASEMENT
                              >
                              > AS STATED -- in letter -- hydrologic study not needed -- BUT -- it
                              > is
                              > good to collect some data to be able to understand all the possible
                              > things that
                              > may happen.
                              >
                              > !. Sealing at the inside of a concrete wall does not always stop the
                              > leaks.
                              > (Water rises up or goes laterally to find new "weak" spot.)
                              >
                              > 2. Establishing 2 or 3 piezometers around the upslope side (the
                              > direction
                              > from which the water in the ground is coming toward the wall) --
                              > will allow
                              > the height or head of water behind (and upslope of) the wall to be
                              > monitored.
                              >
                              > 3. The effective of sealing/draining - if sump pump used- - can thus
                              > be
                              > determined.
                              >
                              > 4. If the area of leakage into the basement can be isolated - it may
                              > only
                              > be necessary to dig short distance
                              > outside the wall to reach the area requiring sealing. (Sealing could
                              > then be
                              > done inside and outside the wall.)
                              >
                              > 5. I have used 12 volt boat bilge pumps -- requiring a small Radio
                              > Shack
                              > transformer @ +/- $12.95 - to drain rather significant leaks into
                              > basements.
                              > (Use pump with float switch) -- System cost +/- $70.00..
                              >
                              > Write if have more questions --
                              >
                              > Georegon
                            • Rose
                              Hello Henry, I live upstate NY in a rural area which I am not use to at all. As I explained, I ve never heard of underground water getting into the basement.
                              Message 14 of 14 , Nov 7, 2007
                                Hello Henry,

                                I live upstate NY in a rural area which I am not use to at all. As I explained, I've never heard of underground water getting into the basement. everybody has pumps going during flood season, which is when the snow melts and spring begins. When the cracks were patched, the water did find another weak crack to get in. others wrote in with some suggestions which I'm gonna try. I can't do anything expensive which I know is the best thing to do. But one a tight budget. I know now to check on the basement and watch the water flow. Its amazing, with two sump pumps running 24/7 full force for 6 weeks straight!

                                If you were to look at the basement now, you would see no signs of any water down there. after "flood season" is over, the dehumidifier dries everything so well, no one can tell. but, before I know to do this, the damp cement walls in the basement, traveled up to the apartment and caused mold. ugh! I'm now worried about this "flood season" because I know I have a few more cracks that were formed from last year that are still there. If I have them patched, I was told the water will find another way in.

                                So, what to do?

                                thanks for reading this post
                                Rose


                                henryf@... wrote:
                                Uh Rose......

                                Where do you live?

                                Water up to the ceiling?

                                Are you on city water? Are you sure that you are not close to a
                                broken main?
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