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Bishop's College :A Brief History 1851 - 1882.

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  • Sancho of Nabaclis
    Bishop s College :A Brief History 1851 - 1882. The story of Bishop s College is that of an institution which started as a Theological Seminary, developed as a
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 26, 2005
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      Bishop's College :A Brief  History 1851 - 1882.

      The story of Bishop's College is that of an institution which started as a Theological Seminary, developed as a Training College for teachers and ended as a Girls' Reformatory.
       
      In 1850, through the initiative of Bishop W. P. Austin and hs Chaplain, Rev. R. L. Webber, application was made to the S. P. C. K. "for aid in the establishment of a purely Ecclesiastical College, of an essentially Missionary character with a provision  of a sufficient body of Priests and Deacons for the work of the Church in Town and neighbourhood, supplying the means of training candidates for the Ministry, of preparing others to take part in in the instruction of our people, and acquiring the native languages."

      "The Collegiate Grammar School, together with a similar establishment, as yet in its infancy, in New Amsterdam, was to form the source from which worthy candidates might be drawn. The governing body was to consist of a Warden, Sub-Warden, and four Fellows, the office of the Warden to be filled by the Bishop himself.  The students were to be chiefly engaged in study, preparatory to their entrance into  the Ministry, in the forming of Schools, in visiting the sick, and other like pastoral duties. The whole aim of the institution was the acquisition by its younger members of "that deeper and holier tone of feeling which is so indispensable in forming the character of the youthful members of the body."

      "To this appeal the S. P. C. K. responded by a grant of 1,500 pounds sterling. The Bishop also succeeded in raising more than an equal sum from different congregations, and from friends of the Church in England. Accordingly the College was set on foot in the month of January, 1851. Not two months after, Mr. Henry John May arrived from England to enter as a student of  Bishop's College. At Easter 1851, the Rev. R. L. Webber resigned the charge of Queen's College, and was appointed Sub-Warden of the new  Theological School, commencing a regular routine of College Lectures, at the Parsonage of St. Philip in Charlestown.

      "During the next year (1852), Mr. Robert Hillis, and Mr. Augustus Scudamore Tanner, both from England, were received as students. But some slight modifications were introduced into the original plan. In 1853, the Combined Court voted a sum of money to make provision for the training of young men as Schoolmasters. Five scholarships of $100 each, per annum, were allotted to the Church of England, five to the Church of Scotland, and three to the Wesleyan Body. The College authorities resolved to incorporate this Department with the Theological portion, and the Rev. Robert Morgan Eastman was appointed a Fellow of the College to take special charge of the students to be trained as Schoolmasters.

      "In 1852 (February 2), the new buildings, formerly the Dutch Theatre, were opened as the future College: and thus was brought to completion one of the numerous labours for education conceived and brought to maturity by the Bishop of the Diocese....."

      Bishop's College, "as it has always been appropriately called, has ceased to exist as such, and, being now (1892) a purely Government Institution, has become a Reformatory for Girls."

      "The old idea has thus, by force of circumstances, passed away. But it is an idea which is surley worth reviving."

      The  extending of the scope of the Bishop's College beyond that of a Theological School was due to realising that there was the opportunity to implement Kay Shuttleworth's recommendation concerning a residential Normal School for the training of teachers. At  first students were restricted to Anglicans, Presbyterians, and Methodists: but it was not long before the College threw open its lectures to all (1855).

      The age of entry was between 15 and 18 years of age, and the Qualifications for admission the three R's, Dictation, and Composition. The curriculum was liberal. the emphasis wa on residence and on training in service and identifying themselves with the people. Here there was no room for snobbery. The students were to well trained in knowledge and in the art of living together. They were to focus their attention to this country. They were to go and work and live among the people. dress like the people, elevating them by their teaching and example.

      Too much cannot be said in favour of this worthy ideal and of the way in which it was carried out while the College lasted.

      At first the students proved to be tough material and the early reports showed that much shaping or moulding had to be done. But after a short time the reports changed their tenor and Bishop's College produced some of the most outstanding elementary schoolmasters of the country. These were not only good imparters of knowledge by reason of their sound and extensive education, but disciplinarians and inspirers of the youth to high and noble achievement.



      In 1874, the then Governor, James Robert Longden, appointed a Commission of Inquiry into the Educational System. As a result it was enacted that Elementary Education should be compulsory even though not absolutely free, and that schools be classed as Elementary, Public Elementary (i.e., receiving grants), Industrial Schools, Day Industrial Schools (i.e., ordinary elementary schools which undertook a special branch of instruction in addition to the ordinary work of the school) and Colonial Schools of which there was none at the time.

      With reference to Post-Primary education the Commission made two very important recommendations, namely, that both Queen's College and Bishop's College should be taken over by the government. These recommendations were duly carried out in 1877, and for six years Bishop's College, Charlestown, was a Government Training School for Teachers.
      Before he change over Bishop's College must have been declining somewhat. For in the Official Gazette of 1871 we read that the Government was contributing to the


      Support of 12 pupils at the Training Institution ....$1,800
      Support of Training Master                            .....$1,000
      Grant to Bishop's College                             ......$   900

      In the British Guiana Directory for 1876 when the Warden was Rev. C. Page Wood, B. A., Training Master (Acting) Rev. F. P. L. Josa and Normal Master G. W. McFarlane, there were only nine students in residence -  5 C. of  E. (Messrs. McRae, Bowen, Castello, MacMillan, Waldron), 3 Wesleyan (Gordon, Samuels, Abrahams) and 1 L. M. S. (Waddell). The Normal Master was a Congregationalist who had been trained by the Rev. Joseph Ketley.

      In 1878 there were still only nine males under training who resided in the College; there was then no accommodation for female students. In the 1879 Directory we read that the Court of Policy had "increased the number and raised the value to $100 each".  In the same account we read  that "During the past two years six students had been sent up ( two in 1878) to the Public Examination for Masters' Certificates one of whom  obtained a First Class and the other five Second Class Certificates. 16 Candidates had passed  their Matriculation Examination during the year. Again it was mentioned that there was then no accommodation for female students.

      Bishop's College was not the only training ground for teachers at that time, though its position as a Residential College put it in  a class by itself.  Other Ministers and private  teachers also prepared candidates for the examinations which were very exacting. The Two Bishop's College candidates for 1878 were placed second and fourth in order of merit.

      Source: 
      Cameron, Norman Eustace, Bishop's College - 150 Years of Education in Guyana, 1808 - 1957 : Pages 29, 30 & 31.
      Farrar, Thomas (ed.) Notes on the History of the Church in Guyana : page 98.

      M'lilwana Osanku's Observations, Interests, and Questions:-

      I am very interested in learning :
      • Who were trained at Bishop's College?
      • Biographical accounts of the student teachers of Bishop's College?
      • Who were trained at Mico College; Antigua, Mico College; Jamaica, Rawle College; Barbados, Tranquility College; Trinidad, Shortwood College; Jamaica, and St Joseph's College; Jamaica?
      • Who were trained at Government Teachers' Training Centre, Georgetown, British Guiana, 1932-1934 (the Third Batch)?
      • Biographical accounts, including photographic images of the student teachers of  the Third Batch, 1932-1934?
      • The experiences and contributions of Alumnus of  Bishop's College, especially those who exercised their skills on the East Coast of Demerara.
      • The educators, who influenced members of the Sancho and Young (Younge) families (especially Miss Muriel Sancho, later Mrs. Muriel Ross) and other relatives to pursue careers in the field of education.

      I am aware; Mr. Daniel E. Sharples (Head Master for 40 years at St. Thomas Scots School, beginning on July 1, 1876), Mr. Paul A. Jones (Head Master, Taymouth Manor), Mr. F. A. R. Sutherland (Head Master, Danielstown), Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott and Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson, are numbered among the group of  Schoolmasters who were trained at Bishop's College, (1872 - 1875). Who are the others?

      I have some awareness of  the roles, Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott and Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson, played  in the various phases of life within the villages of  Haslington, Golden Grove and Nabaclis. Thus I would like to learn of the others who participated in Community development in Golden Grove and Nabaclis district.

      I am particularly interested  in the careers and immediate relatives of the following Teachers; Mr. Thomas Arthur Archer; (Mahaica W., Philadelphia S.,), Samuel Augustus Campbell; (St. Philip's E.), Mr. Joseph Alfred Trotman; (Golden Grove W.,), Mr. Hubert Alfred Thompson; (Cove & John E.), James Donald Ainsworth; (Victoria W.),  Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson; (Enmore Front), Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott; (Bachelor's Adventure), (and his brothers;  Mr. Thomas R. F. Elliott, and Mr. John Elliott), M. A. L. Joseph; (Friendship Lower E), Mr. Prince Josephus Patterson, Mr. Cecil Orpheus Philbertus Patterson, Mr. George Henry A. Bunyan,  Mr. L. Evelyn Moe; (St. George's E), Mr. George R. Smith; (St. Stephen's Scots), Mr. Osborne, Mr. Francis Percival  Loncke, Gladys Paul, Rosina Parkinson, Eileen S. Ogle, Mrs. Catherine Cole, Mr. Charles C. Solomon; (Friendship Upper Wesleyan), Moses Rodney; (Beterverwagting M), J. A. Sam (Nonpreil), W. A. Younge; (Friendship Lower E), and J. W. Cox (Cove & John E.) .

      Share with me your knowledge of the following teachers; Miss Muriel Sancho, (known as Mrs. Muriel Ross after January 29, 1943), Mr. T. Anson Sancho, Mr. U. Leebert Sancho, M's. Lorna Sancho, Miss Phyllis Beatrice Archer, Mrs. Catherine Cole, Mr. Birchell Ivan Ralph, Mr. Lloyd Fawcett Bradshaw, Mrs. Nora Elliott Bradshaw-Vigilance, and Mrs. Annie Kathleen Patterson, formerly Miss Annie Kathleen Elliott.

      The histories of the schools including  the stated periods; Golden Grove Methodists (1928-32), St. Andrew's Anglican (1934-1945), Cumberland Methodist (1955- 1966), St. Patrick's (1950 -1966),  No# 68 Government Primary (1966-1972), New Market Anglican (1935 - 1950), Port Mourant Roman Catholic (1945- 1952), and Blairmont Government (1952-1961).

      Let us communicate - shall we?

      M'lilwana Osanku.
      Sancho of Nabaclis.


      Bishop's College :A Brief  History 1851 - 1882.

      The story of Bishop's College is that of an institution which started as a Theological Seminary, developed as a Training College for teachers and ended as a Girls' Reformatory.
       
      In 1850, through the initiative of Bishop W. P. Austin and hs Chaplain, Rev. R. L. Webber, application was made to the S. P. C. K. "for aid in the establishment of a purely Ecclesiastical College, of an essentially Missionary character with a provision  of a sufficient body of Priests and Deacons for the work of the Church in Town and neighbourhood, supplying the means of training candidates for the Ministry, of preparing others to take part in in the instruction of our people, and acquiring the native languages."

      "The Collegiate Grammar School, together with a similar establishment, as yet in its infancy, in New Amsterdam, was to form the source from which worthy candidates might be drawn. The governing body was to consist of a Warden, Sub-Warden, and four Fellows, the office of the Warden to be filled by the Bishop himself.  The students were to be chiefly engaged in study, preparatory to their entrance into  the Ministry, in the forming of Schools, in visiting the sick, and other like pastoral duties. The whole aim of the institution was the acquisition by its younger members of "that deeper and holier tone of feeling which is so indispensable in forming the character of the youthful members of the body."

      "To this appeal the S. P. C. K. responded by a grant of 1,500 pounds sterling. The Bishop also succeeded in raising more than an equal sum from different congregations, and from friends of the Church in England. Accordingly the College was set on foot in the month of January, 1851. Not two months after, Mr. Henry John May arrived from England to enter as a student of  Bishop's College. At Easter 1851, the Rev. R. L. Webber resigned the charge of Queen's College, and was appointed Sub-Warden of the new  Theological School, commencing a regular routine of College Lectures, at the Parsonage of St. Philip in Charlestown.

      "During the next year (1852), Mr. Robert Hillis, and Mr. Augustus Scudamore Tanner, both from England, were received as students. But some slight modifications were introduced into the original plan. In 1853, the Combined Court voted a sum of money to make provision for the training of young men as Schoolmasters. Five scholarships of $100 each, per annum, were allotted to the Church of England, five to the Church of Scotland, and three to the Wesleyan Body. The College authorities resolved to incorporate this Department with the Theological portion, and the Rev. Robert Morgan Eastman was appointed a Fellow of the College to take special charge of the students to be trained as Schoolmasters.

      "In 1852 (February 2), the new buildings, formerly the Dutch Theatre, were opened as the future College: and thus was brought to completion one of the numerous labours for education conceived and brought to maturity by the Bishop of the Diocese....."

      Bishop's College, "as it has always been appropriately called, has ceased to exist as such, and, being now (1892) a purely Government Institution, has become a Reformatory for Girls."

      "The old idea has thus, by force of circumstances, passed away. But it is an idea which is surley worth reviving."

      The  extending of the scope of the Bishop's College beyond that of a Theological School was due to realising that there was the opportunity to implement Kay Shuttleworth's recommendation concerning a residential Normal School for the training of teachers. At  first students were restricted to Anglicans, Presbyterians, and Methodists: but it was not long before the College threw open its lectures to all (1855).

      The age of entry was between 15 and 18 years of age, and the Qualifications for admission the three R's, Dictation, and Composition. The curriculum was liberal. the emphasis wa on residence and on training in service and identifying themselves with the people. Here there was no room for snobbery. The students were to well trained in knowledge and in the art of living together. They were to focus their attention to this country. They were to go and work and live among the people. dress like the people, elevating them by their teaching and example.

      Too much cannot be said in favour of this worthy ideal and of the way in which it was carried out while the College lasted.

      At first the students proved to be tough material and the early reports showed that much shaping or moulding had to be done. But after a short time the reports changed their tenor and Bishop's College produced some of the most outstanding elementary schoolmasters of the country. These were not only good imparters of knowledge by reason of their sound and extensive education, but disciplinarians and inspirers of the youth to high and noble achievement.



      In 1874, the then Governor, James Robert Longden, appointed a Commission of Inquiry into the Educational System. As a result it was enacted that Elementary Education should be compulsory even though not absolutely free, and that schools be classed as Elementary, Public Elementary (i.e., receiving grants), Industrial Schools, Day Industrial Schools (i.e., ordinary elementary schools which undertook a special branch of instruction in addition to the ordinary work of the school) and Colonial Schools of which there was none at the time.

      With reference to Post-Primary education the Commission made two very important recommendations, namely, that both Queen's College and Bishop's College should be taken over by the government. These recommendations were duly carried out in 1877, and for six years Bishop's College, Charlestown, was a Government Training School for Teachers.
      Before he change over Bishop's College must have been declining somewhat. For in the Official Gazette of 1871 we read that the Government was contributing to the


      Support of 12 pupils at the Training Institution ....$1,800
      Support of Training Master                            .....$1,000
      Grant to Bishop's College                             ......$   900

      In the British Guiana Directory for 1876 when the Warden was Rev. C. Page Wood, B. A., Training Master (Acting) Rev. F. P. L. Josa and Normal Master G. W. McFarlane, there were only nine students in residence -  5 C. of  E. (Messrs. McRae, Bowen, Castello, MacMillan, Waldron), 3 Wesleyan (Gordon, Samuels, Abrahams) and 1 L. M. S. (Waddell). The Normal Master was a Congregationalist who had been trained by the Rev. Joseph Ketley.

      In 1878 there were still only nine males under training who resided in the College; there was then no accommodation for female students. In the 1879 Directory we read that the Court of Policy had "increased the number and raised the value to $100 each".  In the same account we read  that "During the past two years six students had been sent up ( two in 1878) to the Public Examination for Masters' Certificates one of whom  obtained a First Class and the other five Second Class Certificates. 16 Candidates had passed  their Matriculation Examination during the year. Again it was mentioned that there was then no accommodation for female students.

      Bishop's College was not the only training ground for teachers at that time, though its position as a Residential College put it in  a class by itself.  Other Ministers and private  teachers also prepared candidates for the examinations which were very exacting. The Two Bishop's College candidates for 1878 were placed second and fourth in order of merit.

      Source: 
      Cameron, Norman Eustace, Bishop's College - 150 Years of Education in Guyana, 1808 - 1957 : Pages 29, 30 & 31.
      Farrar, Thomas (ed.) Notes on the History of the Church in Guyana : page 98.

      M'lilwana Osanku's Observations, Interests, and Questions:-

      I am very interested in learning :
      • Who were trained at Bishop's College?
      • Biographical accounts of the student teachers of Bishop's College?
      • Who were trained at Mico College; Antigua, Mico College; Jamaica, Rawle College; Barbados, Tranquility College; Trinidad, Shortwood College; Jamaica, and St Joseph's College; Jamaica?
      • Who were trained at Government Teachers' Training Centre, Georgetown, British Guiana, 1932-1934 (the Third Batch)?
      • Biographical accounts, including photographic images of the student teachers of  the Third Batch, 1932-1934?
      • The experiences and contributions of Alumnus of  Bishop's College, especially those who exercised their skills on the East Coast of Demerara.
      • The educators, who influenced members of the Sancho and Young (Younge) families (especially Miss Muriel Sancho, later Mrs. Muriel Ross) and other relatives to pursue careers in the field of education.

      I am aware; Mr. Daniel E. Sharples (Head Master for 40 years at St. Thomas Scots School, beginning on July 1, 1876), Mr. Paul A. Jones (Head Master, Taymouth Manor), Mr. F. A. R. Sutherland (Head Master, Danielstown), Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott and Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson, are numbered among the group of  Schoolmasters who were trained at Bishop's College, (1872 - 1875). Who are the others?

      I have some awareness of  the roles, Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott and Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson, played  in the various phases of life within the villages of  Haslington, Golden Grove and Nabaclis. Thus I would like to learn of the others who participated in Community development in Golden Grove and Nabaclis district.

      I am particularly interested  in the careers and immediate relatives of the following Teachers; Mr. Thomas Arthur Archer; (Mahaica W., Philadelphia S.,), Samuel Augustus Campbell; (St. Philip's E.), Mr. Joseph Alfred Trotman; (Golden Grove W.,), Mr. Hubert Alfred Thompson; (Cove & John E.), James Donald Ainsworth; (Victoria W.),  Mr. Joseph A. Parkinson; (Enmore Front), Mr. Tappin Johnson Elliott; (Bachelor's Adventure), (and his brothers;  Mr. Thomas R. F. Elliott, and Mr. John Elliott), M. A. L. Joseph; (Friendship Lower E), Mr. Prince Josephus Patterson, Mr. Cecil Orpheus Philbertus Patterson, Mr. George Henry A. Bunyan,  Mr. L. Evelyn Moe; (St. George's E), Mr. George R. Smith; (St. Stephen's Scots), Mr. Osborne, Mr. Francis Percival  Loncke, Gladys Paul, Rosina Parkinson, Eileen S. Ogle, Mrs. Catherine Cole, Mr. Charles C. Solomon; (Friendship Upper Wesleyan), Moses Rodney; (Beterverwagting M), J. A. Sam (Nonpreil), W. A. Younge; (Friendship Lower E), and J. W. Cox (Cove & John E.) .

      Share with me your knowledge of the following teachers; Miss Muriel Sancho, (known as Mrs. Muriel Ross after January 29, 1943), Mr. T. Anson Sancho, Mr. U. Leebert Sancho, M's. Lorna Sancho, Miss Phyllis Beatrice Archer, Mrs. Catherine Cole, Mr. Birchell Ivan Ralph, Mr. Lloyd Fawcett Bradshaw, Mrs. Nora Elliott Bradshaw-Vigilance, and Mrs. Annie Kathleen Patterson, formerly Miss Annie Kathleen Elliott.

      The histories of the schools including  the stated periods; Golden Grove Methodists (1928-32), St. Andrew's Anglican (1934-1945), Cumberland Methodist (1955- 1966), St. Patrick's (1950 -1966),  No# 68 Government Primary (1966-1972), New Market Anglican (1935 - 1950), Port Mourant Roman Catholic (1945- 1952), and Blairmont Government (1952-1961).

      Let us communicate - shall we?






       
      M'lilwana Osanku -[Selwyn H. Ross]--Sancho of Nabaclis
      Researcher for Sancho Family History
      Golden Grove and Nabaclis, Guyana.


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