Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Fwd: RE: Gaelic Nabocklish (Nabaclis): A Plantation in Guyana - Can you Enlighten Me?

Expand Messages
  • Sancho of Nabaclis
    I would love to share with you the contents of this email. Does n t this prove that Nabaclis is named after the Irish and not after African slaves? Your
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      I would love to share with you the contents of this email. Does n't this prove that Nabaclis is named after the Irish and not after "African" slaves? Your thoughts will be most welcomed.


      To: childrenofsancho@...
      Subject: RE: Gaelic Nabocklish (Nabaclis): A Plantation in Guyana - Can you Enlighten Me?
      Date: Sun, 05 Mar 2006 10:05:43 +0000

      Dear Sancho of Nabocklis,

      Thank you for your email. I am intrigued as to how you came by my email address or who advised you to get in touch with me. I would be most grateful if you would let me know.

      Your query is an interesting one indeed. Yes, Irish people did love and work in 19th century Guyana.
      The first two Roman Catholic bishops of Guyana were Dr William Clancy and Dr John Thomas Hynes a native of Cork. Both of those individuals were to say the least controversial. Some other members of the Cathoilc clergy were also
      from Ireland, (one Fr John Cullen was particularly interesting as he would subsequently go to work in Argentina). The Ursuline sisters were brought to Guyana from Sligo by Dr Hynes. Dr Clancy brought out a group of Presentation Sisters from Cork to Guyana.

      Now to you enquiry. In Ireland people refer to the native language by
      calling it ''Irish'' rather than Gaelic. The ''Nabocklis'' which you ask
      about is most interesting as it is written phonetically for the Irish which
      follows; ''na bac leis'' is the Irish for saying ''don't pay attention (to
      him/her, or to it).

      I don't know anything about Irish families, or Irish plantation owners in
      Demarara or other parts of
      Guyana, such as Essquibeo or around Georgetown. I'm not aware of any
      research has been done
      about the Iirsh in Guyana, but as will be in Dublin in the next few days,
      will make some enquiries
      to bring myself up to date about that topic.

      I will get back to you in the next few weeks. In mean time, many thanks for
      writing and I look forward to hearing from you.
      Sincerely
      Edward Walsh

      >From: Sancho of Nabaclis
      >To: jeogwalsh@...
      >Subject: Gaelic Nabocklish (Nabaclis): A Plantation in Guyana - Can you
      >Enlighten Me?
      >Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 10:09:20 -0800 (PST)
      >
      >Highest blessings!
      >
      > J. Rodway, F.L.S., an early Guyanese historian stated in an article -
      >The Name of our Plantations - “Never mind! (Nooitgedacht) was not only the
      >cry of the Dutchman but of the Irishman, as well when he said in Gaelic
      >Nabocklish (Nabaclis); this is the only distinctly Irish name I can find.
      >Do not mourn!”
      >
      > However, I found a horse and Captain Kennedy’s drawing room in Hogan’s
      >directories of Kilkee 1842-1863 named Nabocklish.
      >
      > It is known that between 1807 and 1848, Bayley, Gainsfort, Reed,
      >Turton, and Walrond were connected to the three neighboring plantations;
      >Haslington, Golden Grove and Nabaclis. Bayley of Haslington, were
      >horseracing enthusiasts. The Bayley family owned Racehorses, which grazed
      >in Haslington. The horses participated in Races, which were held at
      >Belfield, the main racecourse in Guyana, in that era.
      >
      > Two writers give conflicting reports regarding the owners of the cotton
      >estate Golden Grove at the time it was sold to Africans in British Guiana.
      >Traveller, a columnist for the Daily Chronicle, stated Bayley owned both
      >Golden Grove and Haslington. Mr. Bayley sold the plantation to Mr. Bentick
      >Sancho. Sarrabo, a village leader, stated Richard Straker Turton, was the
      >owner who in January 5th, 1848 sold the plantation to a group of
      >shareholders, which included Sancho and forty-seven others.
      >
      >
      >
      > Can pinpoint a location, or place, people, and items, in Ireland and or
      >Europe, which indicate the origins of Nabocklish?
      > Can you recommend some one who will be able to enlighten me concerning
      >the plantation in Demerara being named Nabocklish and its connection to
      >Ireland?
      > Is there catalogue of Irish families who were owners of plantations in
      >Demerara?
      > Are Bayley, Gainsfort, O’Brien, Reed, Turton, and Walrond connected to
      >an Irish background?
      > Can you explain Nabocklish?
      > Is the Kennedy family of USA politicians from Kilkee?
      > How about Reed and O'Brien families are they from Kilkee and did they
      >have business in Demerara?
      >
      >
      >
      > Eternal Blessings, Love, Peace, Power & Unity
      >M'lilwana Osanku - Sancho of Nabaclis.
      > Researching - Sancho, Campbell, Young (Younge), Solomon, Ross & Martin
      >- Families of Guyana.
      >History of Golden Grove and Nabaclis Village District, East Sea Coast
      >Demerara, Guyana.
      >
      > "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and
      >culture is like a tree without roots." The Most Honourable Marcus Garvey
      >(1887-1940) People's Power Forever Vote AFC Tme for Change - down with
      >ethnic politics -
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Mail
      > Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.





      Eternal Blessings, Love, Peace, Power & Unity
      M'lilwana Osanku - Sancho of Nabaclis.
      Researching - Sancho, Campbell, Young (Younge), Solomon, Ross & Martin - Families of Guyana.
      History of Golden Grove and Nabaclis Village District, East Sea Coast Demerara, Guyana.
      "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots." The Most Honourable Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) People's Power Forever Vote AFC Tme for Change - down with ethnic politics -


      Yahoo! Mail
      Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.

    • Jon - Budmart.co.uk
      Hello Sancho It is intriguing as i had never thought of Nabaclis as being Irish before although it is quite possible. Bare in mind that a lot of words and
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 8, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Sancho
         
        It is intriguing as i had never thought of Nabaclis as being Irish before although it is quite possible.
         
        Bare in mind that a lot of words and terms were corrupted so it is possible that Nabaclis could be Irish but it could also derive from another source but be similiar in spelling.
         
        It is worth looking into.
         
        Regards
         
        Jon

        Sancho of Nabaclis <childrenofsancho@...> wrote:
        I would love to share with you the contents of this email. Does n't this prove that Nabaclis is named after the Irish and not after "African" slaves? Your thoughts will be most welcomed.


        To: childrenofsancho@...
        Subject: RE: Gaelic Nabocklish (Nabaclis): A Plantation in Guyana - Can you Enlighten Me?
        Date: Sun, 05 Mar 2006 10:05:43 +0000

        Dear Sancho of Nabocklis,

        Thank you for your email. I am intrigued as to how you came by my email address or who advised you to get in touch with me. I would be most grateful if you would let me know.

        Your query is an interesting one indeed. Yes, Irish people did love and work in 19th century Guyana.
        The first two Roman Catholic bishops of Guyana were Dr William Clancy and Dr John Thomas Hynes a native of Cork. Both of those individuals were to say the least controversial. Some other members of the Cathoilc clergy were also
        from Ireland, (one Fr John Cullen was particularly interesting as he would subsequently go to work in Argentina). The Ursuline sisters were brought to Guyana from Sligo by Dr Hynes. Dr Clancy brought out a group of Presentation Sisters from Cork to Guyana.

        Now to you enquiry. In Ireland people refer to the native language by
        calling it ''Irish'' rather than Gaelic. The ''Nabocklis'' which you ask
        about is most interesting as it is written phonetically for the Irish which
        follows; ''na bac leis'' is the Irish for saying ''don't pay attention (to
        him/her, or to it).

        I don't know anything about Irish families, or Irish plantation owners in
        Demarara or other parts of
        Guyana, such as Essquibeo or around Georgetown. I'm not aware of any
        research has been done
        about the Iirsh in Guyana, but as will be in Dublin in the next few days,
        will make some enquiries
        to bring myself up to date about that topic.

        I will get back to you in the next few weeks. In mean time, many thanks for
        writing and I look forward to hearing from you.
        Sincerely
        Edward Walsh

        >From: Sancho of Nabaclis
        >To: jeogwalsh@...
        >Subject: Gaelic Nabocklish (Nabaclis): A Plantation in Guyana - Can you
        >Enlighten Me?
        >Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2006 10:09:20 -0800 (PST)
        >
        >Highest blessings!
        >
        > J. Rodway, F.L.S., an early Guyanese historian stated in an article -
        >The Name of our Plantations - “Never mind! (Nooitgedacht) was not only the
        >cry of the Dutchman but of the Irishman, as well when he said in Gaelic
        >Nabocklish (Nabaclis); this is the only distinctly Irish name I can find.
        >Do not mourn!”
        >
        > However, I found a horse and Captain Kennedy’s drawing room in Hogan’s
        >directories of Kilkee 1842-1863 named Nabocklish.
        >
        > It is known that between 1807 and 1848, Bayley, Gainsfort, Reed,
        >Turton, and Walrond were connected to the three neighboring plantations;
        >Haslington, Golden Grove and Nabaclis. Bayley of Haslington, were
        >horseracing enthusiasts. The Bayley family owned Racehorses, which grazed
        >in Haslington. The horses participated in Races, which were held at
        >Belfield, the main racecourse in Guyana, in that era.
        >
        > Two writers give conflicting reports regarding the owners of the cotton
        >estate Golden Grove at the time it was sold to Africans in British Guiana.
        >Traveller, a columnist for the Daily Chronicle, stated Bayley owned both
        >Golden Grove and Haslington. Mr. Bayley sold the plantation to Mr. Bentick
        >Sancho. Sarrabo, a village leader, stated Richard Straker Turton, was the
        >owner who in January 5th, 1848 sold the plantation to a group of
        >shareholders, which included Sancho and forty-seven others.
        >
        >
        >
        > Can pinpoint a location, or place, people, and items, in Ireland and or
        >Europe, which indicate the origins of Nabocklish?
        > Can you recommend some one who will be able to enlighten me concerning
        >the plantation in Demerara being named Nabocklish and its connection to
        >Ireland?
        > Is there catalogue of Irish families who were owners of plantations in
        >Demerara?
        > Are Bayley, Gainsfort, O’Brien, Reed, Turton, and Walrond connected to
        >an Irish background?
        > Can you explain Nabocklish?
        > Is the Kennedy family of USA politicians from Kilkee?
        > How about Reed and O'Brien families are they from Kilkee and did they
        >have business in Demerara?
        >
        >
        >
        > Eternal Blessings, Love, Peace, Power & Unity
        >M'lilwana Osanku - Sancho of Nabaclis.
        > Researching - Sancho, Campbell, Young (Younge), Solomon, Ross & Martin
        >- Families of Guyana.
        >History of Golden Grove and Nabaclis Village District, East Sea Coast
        >Demerara, Guyana.
        >
        > "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and
        >culture is like a tree without roots." The Most Honourable Marcus Garvey
        >(1887-1940) People's Power Forever Vote AFC Tme for Change - down with
        >ethnic politics -
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >---------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Mail
        > Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.





        Eternal Blessings, Love, Peace, Power & Unity
        M'lilwana Osanku - Sancho of Nabaclis.
        Researching - Sancho, Campbell, Young (Younge), Solomon, Ross & Martin - Families of Guyana.
        History of Golden Grove and Nabaclis Village District, East Sea Coast Demerara, Guyana.
        "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots." The Most Honourable Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) People's Power Forever Vote AFC Tme for Change - down with ethnic politics -

        Yahoo! Mail
        Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.



        Visit Budmart.co.uk for all your Collecting needs !


        Yahoo! Mail
        Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.