Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Fwd: PRESS: Why African descendants should have free access to slavery records

Expand Messages
  • Sancho of Nabaclis
    Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2007 09:28:38 +0100 Subject: PRESS: Why African descendants should have free access to slavery records ... Why African descendants should
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 30, 2007
    • 0 Attachment

      Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2007 09:28:38 +0100
      Subject: PRESS: Why African descendants should have free access to slavery records



      Why African descendants should have free access to slavery records
      // 30/04/2007 // Deborah Gabriel // Copyright © www.blackbritain.co.uk

      Last week it was announced that a genealogy company plans to put colonial records relating to the chattel enslavement of some three million Africans online. Eventually the archive will hold records for the Caribbean, South Africa and Sri Lanka.

      In order to access records one has to take out a monthly subscription or use the pay-per-view facility, in much the same way that digital satellite services are offered. The company concerned is obviously looking to cash-in on the increased interest during the Bicentenary Year. But I feel strongly, that as the descendant of enslaved Africans whose names may appear in those records, I should not have to subscribe to such a service.

      But my contention is not with the genealogy company, but with the British government. This merely highlights the obligation that it still has to repair some of the damage caused by its forbears. African descendants in the UK - and elsewhere in the Diaspora have been robbed of our history, robbed of our heritage and robbed of our ancestral ties as a consequence of the chattel enslavement of our ancestors.

      As a recent survey revealed, the overwhelming majority of African and African Caribbean people questioned believe that the British government should make reparations for its role in the Maangamizi (African Holocaust). As the word Maangamizi denotes - the mass destruction of African humanity was intentional and has had devastating consequences on the social, cultural, psychological, economic and political development of Africa and its people.

      It is quite apparent that having thrown a few crumbs in the form of funding for so-called projects to commemorate the Bicentenary, that having mumbled a few insincere words of 'regret' about slavery, that having held a sham service to commemorate a year that is of little significance to people of African descent, that Blair and his government are swiftly trying to move the agenda on, to sweep it all under the carpet and get back to business as usual.

      It won't work. The complete and utter lack of respect that has been shown to people of African descent thus far, is itself a motivation to pursue the justice that our ancestors fought for with their bare hands on the plantations and on the continent. I want to know who my ancestors were who were robbed of their freedom and humanity - but I am not paying for the privilege; neither should any other African descendant be expected to.

      Records should be brought out of their hiding places and made public, interrogated and inspected so that the full history - not the doctored, carefully worded and sanitised version - can finally be known. The issue of reparations will never go away- the voices will only multiply and become louder until they are deafening. So the sooner the British government meets its obligations the sooner it will get peace. It can start by helping us to trace our ancestors - free of charge.







       
      Guyana's 1905 Rebellion - Nigel Westmaas


      Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
      Check out new cars at Yahoo! Autos.

    • Joan Seymour
      I agree that we should not have to pay for this service. I wanted to use the free trial for two weeks but still had to give a credit card number and you can
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree that we should not have to pay for this service. I wanted to use
        the "free trial " for two weeks but still had to give a credit card
        number and you can only cancel by telephone call, not on-line. I think
        that is deceptive, Joan

        Sancho of Nabaclis wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2007 09:28:38 +0100
        > Subject: PRESS: Why African descendants should have free access to
        > slavery records
        >
        >
        >
        > <http://adserver.colourfulnetwork.net/a.aspx?ZoneID=28&Task=Click&Mode=HTML&SiteID=1&PageID=36499>
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > *Why African descendants should have free access to slavery records*
        > // 30/04/2007 // Deborah Gabriel // Copyright ©
        > www.blackbritain.co.uk <http://www.blackbritain.co.uk/>
        >
        >
        >
        > Last week it was announced that a genealogy company plans to put
        > colonial records relating to the chattel enslavement of some three
        > million Africans online. Eventually the archive will hold records
        > for the Caribbean, South Africa and Sri Lanka.
        >
        > In order to access records one has to take out a monthly
        > subscription or use the pay-per-view facility, in much the same
        > way that digital satellite services are offered. The company
        > concerned is obviously looking to cash-in on the increased
        > interest during the Bicentenary Year. But I feel strongly, that as
        > the descendant of enslaved Africans whose names may appear in
        > those records, I should not have to subscribe to such a service.
        >
        > But my contention is not with the genealogy company, but with the
        > British government. This merely highlights the obligation that it
        > still has to repair some of the damage caused by its forbears.
        > African descendants in the UK - and elsewhere in the Diaspora have
        > been robbed of our history, robbed of our heritage and robbed of
        > our ancestral ties as a consequence of the chattel enslavement of
        > our ancestors.
        >
        > As a recent survey revealed, the overwhelming majority of African
        > and African Caribbean people questioned believe that the British
        > government should make reparations for its role in the
        > /Maangamizi/ (African Holocaust). As the word /Maangamizi/ denotes
        > - the mass destruction of African humanity was /intentional/ and
        > has had devastating consequences on the social, cultural,
        > psychological, economic and political development of Africa and
        > its people.
        >
        > It is quite apparent that having thrown a few crumbs in the form
        > of funding for so-called projects to commemorate the Bicentenary,
        > that having mumbled a few insincere words of 'regret' about
        > slavery, that having held a sham service to commemorate a year
        > that is of little significance to people of African descent, that
        > Blair and his government are swiftly trying to move the agenda on,
        > to sweep it all under the carpet and get back to business as usual.
        >
        > It won't work. The complete and utter lack of respect that has
        > been shown to people of African descent thus far, is itself a
        > motivation to pursue the justice that our ancestors fought for
        > with their bare hands on the plantations and on the continent. I
        > want to know who my ancestors were who were robbed of their
        > freedom and humanity - but I am not paying for the privilege;
        > neither should any other African descendant be expected to.
        >
        > Records should be brought out of their hiding places and made
        > public, interrogated and inspected so that the full history - not
        > the doctored, carefully worded and sanitised version - can finally
        > be known. The issue of reparations will never go away- the voices
        > will only multiply and become louder until they are deafening. So
        > the sooner the British government meets its obligations the sooner
        > it will get peace. It can start by helping us to trace our
        > ancestors - free of charge.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > "The people are doing nothing. It is the Government who are rioting
        > and shooting down the people." —Guyanese worker to British soldier:
        > /Guiana Chronicle/, 5th December 1905
        > <http://www.myspace.com/baobabspirittree>
        > Guyana's 1905 Rebellion - Nigel Westmaas
        > *http://www.solidarity-us.org/node/1139
        > <http://www.solidarity-us.org/node/1139>*
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
        > Check out new cars at Yahoo! Autos.
        > <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=48245/*http://autos.yahoo.com/new_cars.html;_ylc=X3oDMTE1YW1jcXJ2BF9TAzk3MTA3MDc2BHNlYwNtYWlsdGFncwRzbGsDbmV3LWNhcnM->
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        > Version: 7.5.467 / Virus Database: 269.6.1/778 - Release Date: 4/27/2007 1:39 PM
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.