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Re: [GTh] L29 dwell?

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  • timster132@aol.com
    I got a question for all you coptophiles . In L29, Jesus marvels at how wealth (=spirit) has come to dwell in poverty (=flesh/body). The Coptic word for
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 15, 2011
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      I got a question for all you "coptophiles".
       
      In L29, Jesus marvels at how wealth (=spirit) has come to dwell in poverty (=flesh/body).
       
      The Coptic word for "dwell" is "oyox", but it doesn't mean to inhabit or dwell, it simply means “to place”.  It is used elsewhere in the Gospel of Thomas in L64 referring to "the placing" of "an order". It would seem the literal meaning of this sentence is that wealth (spirit) is simply located in the same place as poverty (matter/body).
       
      It made me wonder if "dwell" comes from the influence of John 1:14 where the Word comes to dwell (Greek: eskhnwsen, literally “to pitch a tent”) among humanity. 
       
      Or is the Coptic word "oyox" also used in other coptic mss to refer to dwell or inhabit?
       
       
      always marvelling,
       
      Timster
    • M.W. Grondin
      ... Well, this is variously translated. Lambdin has made its home instead of come to dwell . Robinson et al have taken up residence . My own interlinear
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 16, 2011
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        "Timster" writes:
        > In L29, Jesus marvels at how wealth (=spirit) has come to dwell in poverty (=flesh/body).
         
        Well, this is variously translated. Lambdin has "made its home" instead of "come to dwell".
        Robinson et al have "taken up residence". My own interlinear has "was placed", which
        differs from the others in being passive rather than active.

        > The Coptic word for "dwell" is "oyox" [ouwx], but it doesn't mean to inhabit or dwell,
        > it simply means “to place”.  It is used elsewhere in the Gospel of Thomas in L64 referring
        > to "the placing" of "an order". It would seem the literal meaning of this sentence is that wealth
        > (spirit) is simply located in the same place as poverty (matter/body).
         
        ouwx can also mean 'dwell, reside, be situated", according to Lambdin (Intro to Sahidic
        Coptic, p.300), when used intransitively, and that is how it's used in L29. So ISTM
        correct to translate the word as '(to) place' in L64, where there's a direct object ('orders'),
        and also correct to translate it as 'dwell' in L29, where there's no direct object. My own
        translation of L29 seems to be OK, based on the passive intransitive meaning 'be situated',
        and has the added virtue (to my mind) of employing the same English word for the same
        Coptic word in L64.

        > It made me wonder if "dwell" comes from the influence of John 1:14 where the Word
        > comes to dwell (Greek: eskhnwsen, literally “to pitch a tent”) among humanity.
         
        In what remains of the Greek version of L29, the corresponding word has been
        reconstructed as 'enoikei', which evidently also means 'dwell'.
         
        Best,
        Mike
        p.s.: I've used the font called 'Coptic' in this note. If it doesn't display properly in
        anyone's emailer, please contact me offlist.
      • timster132@aol.com
        Mike, Thanks for your reply. I like your choice of situated for ouwx in L29. That definitely expresses the passive. I noticed Davies has appeared . I
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 21, 2011
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          Mike,
           
          Thanks for your reply. 
           
          I like your choice of "situated" for "ouwx" in L29.  That definitely expresses the passive. I noticed Davies has "appeared".  I believe its time I broke down and bought a real Coptic dictionary.
           
          Thank you again.
           
          Timster
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