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RE: [GTh] Logion 7

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  • David C Hindley
    Thanks for the correction re transliteration sources, Mike. Obviously I did not see the forest for the trees (got only as far as Coptic Fonts ... and stopped
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 19, 2010
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      Thanks for the correction re transliteration sources, Mike.
       
      Obviously I did not see the forest for the trees (got only as far as "Coptic Fonts ..." and stopped reading the label right there).
       
      Yes, sometimes one has to distinguish the sound from the arbitrary symbol chosen for transliteration schemes. Chances are I will, in future, use the standard B-Greek transliterations for letters borrowed from Greek and Carlson's symbols for the Coptic letters. If I try to represent the sounds, which will not be often, I will of course utilize your suggestions.
       

      Respectfully,

      Dave Hindley
      Newton Falls, Ohio USA

       


      From: gthomas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gthomas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of M.W. Grondin
      Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2010 12:26 AM
      To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [GTh] Logion 7

      > ... I would have added long-i 'y', as in 'psyche', and Takla
      seems
      > to support that.
       
      Sorry, scratch that. The rule I misunderstood is "as a Greek vowell, 'i'".
      I was reading the letter 'i' as in English, as the sound of 'eye'. But my 
      rudimentary sources tell me that iota had two sounds - long as in 'feet'
      or short as in 'fit' - neither of which is the 'eye' sound in the English
      pronunciation of 'psyche'. The long-iota 'ee' sound seems to support
      Plumley's choice of 'we' as the name of the Coptic upsilon, but to add to
      the confusion, Takla indicates that the Coptic 'I' could also have the 'ee'
      sound. For purposes of transliteration, however, (as opposed to a
      representation of the sound of a word) the best choices seem to be 'Y'
      or 'U'- the former because that's the English letter that the uncial Coptic
      letter most closely resembles, the latter because it accords with standard
      Greek translit schemes (which in turn are balancing acts between form
      and sound.)
       
      Mike
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