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Re: [GTh] Re: Logion 64 & Luke 14:15-24

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  • M.W. Grondin
    ... I think you may be using Lambdin, whose translation of 64.1 is this: A man had received visitors. And when he had prepared the dinner, he sent his servant
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 7, 2010
      [Dave Hindley]:
      > Perhaps I am put off track by the fact the version I used (I think it is yours,
      > but maybe not) says he received (past tense) visitors. Then goes out and
      > invites (more? the same?) guests as if the dinner was not preplanned.
       
      I think you may be using Lambdin, whose translation of 64.1 is this:
       
      "A man had received visitors. And when he had prepared the dinner,
      he sent his servant to invite the guests."
       
      This wording does indeed suggest that the invited guests are different from
      the visitors, but that's unsupported by the underlying Coptic. As I said, it's
      the same Coptic word in both places. I adopted 'visitors' for both; most
      other translations have 'guests' for both. We have no way of knowing why
      Lambdin used different English words in the two places, but that's not
      uncommon in free translations (though rarely in such close proximity to each
      other, when the source-language word in question isn't being used in different
      senses), so we have to be alert to the danger of using a single translation, as
      well as going from the English alone.
       
      > Does Coptic have past and future tenses like Greek, or is it more like punctiliar
      > vs continuous action that can be interpreted as past or future action, as in Hebrew?
       
      Coptic has a variety of verb tenses, including past and future.
       
      Mike G.
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