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Re: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: format of papyrus sheets

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  • Michael Grondin
    ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
      > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
      > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
      > See the Wikipedia.

      As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
      from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
      didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
      usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

      "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
      to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
      which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
      to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
      of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

      Mike
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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