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Re: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Michael Grondin
    Hi Bob, I notice that your note includes links to wikipedia articles on vellum and parchment . Was that your own doing or was it generated automatically?
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010
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      Hi Bob,

      I notice that your note includes links to wikipedia articles on 'vellum'
      and 'parchment'. Was that your own doing or was it generated
      automatically? (Just curious - the sheets are papyrus, BTW.) As to
      your questions, they're somewhat beyond me. I can tell you that the
      sizes of the codices aren't uniform, and that Codices II and III are the
      largest (both 37 sheets, not including endpapers). Further information
      can be found on a section of my site that I put up back in '97-98,
      titled "Maps of the Nag Hammadi Codices":
      http://www.geocities.com/Athens/9068/x_cdxmap.htm

      Mike
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
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        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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