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Re: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Bob Schacht
    ... Mike, Does the codex seem to be a full set of quires (each consisting of 4 folded sheets of vellum or
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010
      At 09:06 PM 2/7/2010, Michael Grondin wrote:
       

      ...When the codex is open, an even-numbered page is on the left, an odd-
      numbered page on the right, so one would open to pages 32-33, e.g.,
      and pages 31-32 would be on opposite sides of the left-hand leaf, pages
      33-34 on opposite sides of the other. (The codex wasn't originally
      paginated, but the facsimile pagination seems to be well-based.)

      Mike,
      Does the codex seem to be a full set of quires (each consisting of 4 folded sheets of vellum or parchment, i.e. 8 leaves, 16 pages) , with the first and last pages intact, or what? I'm thinking of what Crossan talked about as the functioning unit of papyrus that would have been available in the markets where the scribes would have obtained their blank codices. Has this been determined for the NH archive, or were the codex blanks more variable? In other words, how standardized were the blank codices available to the scribes?

      Bob in AZ
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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