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RE: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Rick Hubbard
    Judy wrote: ... been ... variations in the ... the ... I ll save the details for when I send in the note about Page 33, but yes, there is a significant
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010
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      Judy wrote:

      <snip>

      ||
      ||This really is a very small "inflection" especially in something that has
      been
      ||hand-written. It will be interesting to see if there are similar
      variations in the
      ||other pages, and also if they vary between the pages that are written with
      the
      ||horizontal fibres on top and those with the vertical fibres on top.
      ||

      I'll save the details for when I send in the note about Page 33, but yes,
      there is a significant difference in the slope of the line (at least in
      relative terms) on Page 33 compared to Page 32. It is of course possible to
      see the difference with the naked eye, but when you see the actual numbers,
      you might be surprised. Probably most surprising is the deviation in the
      standard variation between that of Page 32 and Page 33 (the writer wandered
      a lot with the pend. Too tired, maybe?).

      Since Mike is the "Keeper of the Holy Facsimile Edition" maybe he could give
      us a quick run-down on the direction of the fibers on each page. That would
      indeed be helpful.

      Best Regards,

      Rick Hubbard
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
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        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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