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RE: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Judy Redman
    Rick wrote in response to John: It seems me infinitely more likely that what we see here is simply the work of a different scriptor, the presence of which is
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010

       

       

       

      Rick wrote in response to John:


      It seems me infinitely more likely that what we see here is simply the work
      of a different scriptor, the presence of which is simply unclear. (I favor
      the idea that scribe A went home for lunch and a co-worker filled in
      <grin>).

      Although I am no handwriting expert, It looks to me like the work of another scriptor – the formation of the characters is somewhat different as well as the spacing being different.  As I said in my previous post, like Rick I think there is a more prosaic explanation for the change in writers rather than a deliberate attempt for emphasis.

      Judy

       

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      Judy Redman
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      University of New England
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    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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