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RE: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Judy Redman
    Rick says: Since my initial note on this issue, I have devised a way to calculate the trajectory of the line slant, or skew (again using a CAD type program).
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010
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      Rick says:

      Since my initial note on this issue, I have devised a way to calculate the
      trajectory of the line slant, or skew (again using a CAD type program). It
      turns out that my original observation that the lines are indeed, "more or
      less" level. In fact, all the lines on Page 32 skew ever so slightly upward
      (they inflect). By ever so slightly I mean that the standard deviation in
      skew is .3 degrees of inflection (rise from left to right).

      This really is a very small “inflection” especially in something that has been hand-written.  It will be interesting to see if there are similar variations in the other pages, and also if they vary between the pages that are written with the horizontal fibres on top and those with the vertical fibres on top.

      Judy

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      Judy Redman
      PhD Candidate, School of Humanities
      University of New England
      Armidale 2351 Australia
      ph:  +61 2 6773 3401
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    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
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        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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