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RE: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Rick Hubbard
    John Wrote: ... It seems to me that this is unlikely. The first 8 lines of Page 34 contain pretty much only the last sentence of L 78 ( ....Upon them
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 7, 2010
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      John Wrote:

      <snip>

      ||
      ||Are the Larger scribe b lines more significant to the Thomasines?.
      ||

      It seems to me that this is unlikely. The first 8 lines of Page 34 contain
      pretty much only the last sentence of L 78 ("....Upon them are fine garments
      and they are unable to discern the truth.) and the first half or so of L 79
      (A woman from the crowd asked him, 'Blessed are the womb which bore you and
      the breasts which nourished you.' He said to [her], 'Blessed are those who
      have heard the word of the father and have truly kept it......"). I'm not
      too sure if this would qualify as something particularly significant to
      readers.

      It seems me infinitely more likely that what we see here is simply the work
      of a different scriptor, the presence of which is simply unclear. (I favor
      the idea that scribe A went home for lunch and a co-worker filled in
      <grin>).

      Best Regards,

      Rick Hubbard




      ||That would be something that even the new reader might fall upon.
      ||
      ||I note that today in many Bibles this same method is used( A larger type
      or
      ||different script) to emphasis say the words of Jesus.
      ||
      ||That is, are these larger line intentional? If so, then why?
      ||
      ||
      ||Thanks you
      ||
      ||regards
      ||John Moon
      ||Springfield , Tn 37172
      ||=
      ||
      ||
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10, 2010
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        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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