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RE: [GTh] Manuscript Notes: Page 32

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  • Rick Hubbard
    Hi Judy- ... written ... That s a good point. Not that I have looked carefully at a great number of MSS, but I guess I never really paid that much
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 6 5:42 PM
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      Hi Judy-

      You write:

      ||This is quite a normal feature of texts of the time, whether they were
      written
      ||in Coptic or Greek....

      <snip>

      That's a good point. Not that I have looked carefully at a great number of
      MSS, but I guess I never really paid that much attention to those I have
      seen. It's been thirty odd years since I've seen any of the facsimile
      editions of the NHC (other than the Thomas MS) so I can't conjure up a
      picture in my mind about how carefully the left and right sides were
      justified.

      Judy writes:

      ||............................Probably (my opinion) this is less likely to
      happen when an
      ||experienced professional copyist is at work because s/he was better at
      keeping
      ||the letter spacing even across the line. It would also be more likely to
      happen
      ||on the first version of a MS than in copies because in the first version
      it would
      ||be less clear what characters one was going to need to fit into each line.

      That having been said, a couple of questions come to mind:

      First, Page 32 would then seem to qualify as the work of an "experienced"
      copyist since such care was taken to keep the lines horizontally and
      vertically "plumb and square." Moreover, if that is the case, could we dare
      infer that what we have here on this page is not only the work of an
      experienced scriptor, but that we are also looking at a version of the MS
      that is **not** the first edition?

      Second, providing that Page 32 is indeed the work of a pro and that it is
      **not** the copyist's first attempt with the text, what are we to make of
      those pages subsequent to Page 32 that seem to be much less well
      orthographically structured? As yet I certainly haven't gotten to the point
      of measuring them in the same way I did with the first page, but I think by
      just eye-balling the differences one must begin to wonder about the basic
      integrity of the MS. So far as I know, no one has seriously challenged the
      supposition that a single hand is present throughout the Thomas MS (based I
      suppose on the orthographic style). In other words, it seems to be broadly
      accepted that only one person was responsible for composing the text as we
      now have it. But could one advance the theory that apparent differences in
      the care with which various pages were composed might point to a document
      that was put together, taken apart and then put back together again by the
      same person?

      I think that as I work through these pages some more, asking such questions
      might have merit.

      Best Regards,

      Rick Hubbard
    • Michael Grondin
      ... As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson didn t use the
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 10 10:35 AM
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        > In the Middle Ages, ['quire'] had a number of specific meanings, with
        > specific names. In modern times, it refers to 1/20th of a ream, IIRC.
        > See the Wikipedia.

        As I said earlier, Bob, regardless of this and other definitions deriving
        from non-ancient binding and publishing processes, James Robinson
        didn't use the word that way in his Intro to the Facsimile edition. In his
        usage, a quire is an indefinite number of leaves folded together:

        "A *codex* is made up of one or more *gatherings", usually referred
        to as *quires*. For although this term is derived from *quaterniones*,
        which is the designation for gatherings of four sheets (which came
        to predominate), it has taken on the broader meaning of gatherings
        of any number of *sheets* or *bifolios*." (p.32)

        Mike
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