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Re: [GTh] Blog News

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  • Michael Grondin
    ... Thanks for this extraordinarily perceptive and fecund point, Mark. It s one aspect of orality that seems most concrete and graspable. I m not much of a
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 15, 2009
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      Mark wrote:
      > [Pagels] may simply have forgotten the measurements and then,
      > having said "six-foot jar" once, made it part of the repeated story.
      > That can happen in story-telling. We introduce an error inadvertently,
      > but then re-tell it and embed it in our story until we forget the origin
      > of it.

      Thanks for this extraordinarily perceptive and fecund point, Mark.
      It's one aspect of orality that seems most concrete and graspable.
      I'm not much of a story-teller myself, and not much of a fan of oral story-
      telling either, but it's not uncommon among the folks I know, and I presume
      that it was much more common the farther back in time we go. Off the top
      of my head, I would guess that two aspects of the (oral) story-teller's art
      are (1) exaggeration for effect, and (2) the elimination of details that
      detract from the story. (Interestingly, the result would be amplification
      of some parts of the story, simplification of others.) With respect to a
      point under discussion, it strikes me that the move from the complexity of
      "12 codices plus one treatise" to the simplicity of "13 codices" may well
      be an example of aspect (2). In any case, I think that story-telling is an
      important subject well worth investigating, not so much for Gos.Thom.
      as for other gospels and religious stories, both canonical and non, that
      have a significant story-line to them.

      Regards,
      Mike
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