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Re: [GTh] L.90: naxb and chrestos

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  • Exolinguist
    ... Since writing the above, I ve had a chance to do a little checking. The Sinaitic Syriac, the Curetonian Syriac, and the Palestinian Syriac Lectionary all
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 28, 2008
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      I wrote, in my earlier post:

      >
      > Thomas never used it [Christ/Christos] because Thomas did not come from a milieu of Pauline
      > Christianity. The Jewish Christians did not use the term "Christ," and neither
      > did the early Old Syriac textual tradition, based on what we see in Shem Tob's
      > Hebrew Matthew.
      >

      Since writing the above, I've had a chance to do a little checking. The Sinaitic Syriac, the Curetonian Syriac, and the Palestinian Syriac Lectionary all use the term "mashiha" (messiah) instead of the word Christ. Shem Tob's Hebrew Matthew does too ("m√Ęshiach"), although he glosses it once as "kristus/kristos" to explain it. It's impossible to say for sure which vowel Shem Tob intended in the last syllable (making the word respectively either Latin or Greek), because the Hebrew is unpointed. Elsewhere Shem Tob has even glossed in Spanish, so the choice of vowel really doesn't matter.

      It is interesting to note that, in translating the Sinaitic Syriac, Agnes Lewis used the word "Christ," even though the word is never used in the Syriac text. Clearly, the influence of the Greek textual tradition has overwhelmed the older, Aramaic tradition, just as Pauline Christianity overwhelmed Jewish Christianity.

      Holiday greetings to all,

      --Don
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