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P.Brown's Hyperlinear

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  • Michael Grondin
    Paterson Brown (with whom I have had a long internet acquaintance, and who is, I believe, a member of the group) has informed me that he has created and posted
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 4, 2008
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      Paterson Brown (with whom I have had a long internet acquaintance,
      and who is, I believe, a member of the group) has informed me that
      he has created and posted a hyperlinear version of Thomas to his
      Metalogos site:

      www.metalog.org/files/th_interlin.html

      (As far as I know, there are no other GTh interlinears available.)
      In addition to the English and Coptic, Brown has added below each word a
      helpful link to Crum's Coptic Dictionary and/or Plumley's Coptic Grammar.
      (This must have taken a great deal of work, and I commend him for it.)
      The Coptic presentation follows mine (and is properly attributed) with
      respect to line-breaks (which in turn follow the text) and separation of
      combined phrases into mnemonic parts (which is my device). The English
      is Brown's own.

      Looking over but the first few sayings, and comparing the translation with
      my own, I have to say that it seems to me that there are some patterns that
      are not as satisfactory. To take one example, Brown (perhaps following
      Plumley?) translates the Coptic N6I as 'i.e.,' ('that is') instead of 'viz.'
      ('namely'). My examination of usages indicates that the latter more
      accurately captures the meaning of the word as used in GTh. (The verbiage
      following 'i.e.,' should have the same meaning as that which precedes it,
      but in other words; the verbiage following 'viz.' specifies more precisely
      one of the elements (but not all) that precedes it. I think one will find
      that it's the latter function which is performed by N6I in GTh.)

      A second example is the translation of the verbal component -VVAN-.
      Following Lambdin, I translate it as 'should(-verb)'. Brown translates it
      as 'habitually(-verbs)'. But in logion 2, for example, 'habitually' pretty
      clearly does some violence to the intended meaning. (Brown has, e.g.,
      'when he habitually finds, he shall be troubled', which implies that if
      one finds only once, or but a few times, he won't be!) Furthermore,
      in other logions, 'habitually' almost never fits.

      With respect to formatting, Brown uses HTML, while I used GIF files.
      The former is easier to change, and allows for hyperlinks, but has the
      disadvantage of causing some characters and marks to lose proper
      viewability, causing Brown to use underscores in place of overstrokes,
      and perhaps also being unable to represent hyphens in the text (if
      that's the reason they aren't there.)

      One minor complaint - the English over-line occasionally breaks out
      into a larger font. (A problem with editing HTML code.)

      In any case, members may want to peruse Brown's presentation and
      comment on it. There are almost certainly places where Brown's translation
      is preferable to mine, and I would be glad to hear of it, so that I could
      either defend my choice or change it for the better. (Remember that both
      Brown's and my above-the-line English are word-for-word, hence
      necessarily awkward.)

      Mike Grondin
      Mt. Clemens, MI
    • Michael Grondin
      ... Sorry, I meant hypostrophes . There s about 500 of these in the text, many of which are slipped overstrokes , i.e., they follow a letter which should be
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 4, 2008
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        > ... perhaps also being unable to represent hyphens in the text (if
        > that's the reason they aren't there.)

        Sorry, I meant 'hypostrophes'. There's about 500 of these in the
        text, many of which are "slipped overstrokes", i.e., they follow a
        letter which should be overstroked, but isn't. With respect to
        hyphens, however, members may note that my Coptic text
        employs hyphens at the end of lines where a word is continued
        onto the next line. These are not in the text, and Brown doesn't
        use this device. (Such word-breaks, BTW, follow the same
        convention as ours, viz., splitting after a syllable.)

        Mike Grondin
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