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Re: [GTh] Does disrobing in saying 37 refer to baptism?

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  • Jim Bauer
    Jonathon Z. Smith also held to this belief, but I don t have the reference readily available. Jim Bauer ... From: danw888 To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com Sent:
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 24, 2007
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      Jonathon Z. Smith also held to this belief, but I don't have the reference readily available.

      Jim Bauer
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: danw888
      To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2007 11:17 AM
      Subject: [GTh] Does disrobing in saying 37 refer to baptism?


      His disciples said, when will you be revealed to us and when shall we
      see you. "When you disrobe without being ashamed and and take up your
      garments and place them under your feet and trample on them like
      little children, then you will see the son of the living one and not
      be afraid."

      It came to me in the night that there actually is a time in john/jesus
      practice where one publically disrobes.

      In John's baptism one confesses one's sins to the assembled crowd and
      then enters the Jordan, presumably naked. According to Josephus
      writing on John's baptism, baptism was the outward sign of the inward
      change. In other words, one confessed, was forgiven, was no longer
      ashamed, and could strip in public and receive the baptismal water as
      the outward sign.

      The didache, I believe, says that christian baptism should be done in
      living water, but if not available, etc. This means that early
      Christain baptism was still an immersion baptism not a sprinkling
      baptism.

      When will you see Jesus - in baptism, when you feel forgiven enough
      and open enough to strip in public, you will recieve the son of the
      living one, the spirit of Jesus, and not be afraid.

      Trampling on the garments probably refers to putting off the body and
      being clothed in light, symbolized by recieving a white robe at
      baptism, a custom that I believe goes back to New Testament times.

      Here stripping in public functions as a test of one's internal state,
      something like fire-walking in new age psycho/religion.

      Whaddya think?

      Is this new? Is this true?

      Dan W.





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