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Re: [GTh] Adventures in Cyberspace

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  • Michael Grondin
    ... Yes, gospelthomas.net and .org are available, and that s one of the options Peter is considering. Unfortunately, we here in the States seem to disregard
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 11, 2006
      [Judy Redman wrote]:
      > If Peter were putting up a site in Australia, he would
      > not be able to use .com, because it's an extension that's
      > only supposed to be used by commercial organisations.
      > More to the point, commercial organisations are not
      > allowed to use .org and .net domain names, so they are
      > much cheaper than .com ones. Maybe simply changing
      > to one of those would work - I imagine they're not as
      > desirable for commercial organisations, so he's less
      > likely to run into this problem again.

      Yes, 'gospelthomas.net' and .org are available, and that's
      one of the options Peter is considering. Unfortunately, we
      here in the States seem to disregard the meaning of the
      suffixes and assume that every address ends with '.com'.
      My last employer, for example, was a non-profit organization
      that should have used '.org', but instead spent some time
      dickering with a guy who had the '.com' suffix they wanted,
      and was asking $7000 for it. (Eventually, they settled on
      '.org', but not without worrying that nobody would find their
      site, because they believed that everyone else would
      assume a '.com' suffix.) Is there an organization in Australia
      that controls these things? I don't believe there's one in the
      States, and I'm not aware that the internat'l organization
      looks into this very carefully at all. I could be wrong, though.

      BTW, I looked into whether the name 'gospelthomas.net'
      was available thru Geocities - my own host site. (I assume
      that they would put in a request for it on my behalf). It looks
      as if it is, and that I could get it for no more than I'm paying
      now - which is $5 per month (basically to prevent Geocities
      advertising from popping up on my site). Not that I'm seriously
      thinking of doing this (even if I were, I'd give Peter first shot),
      but I wonder if having a domain-name might not have certain
      indirect beneficial results. Would it be more likely to receive
      notice in print and on scholarly sites? Dunno. But what about
      the downside? Would the existing address still work? (That's
      important, cuz there's links to it all over, and it's also in print.)
      Any thoughts on this, or on domain-name versus personal
      page? (To me, a rose by any other name ... but names can
      influence us, even if not consciously.)

      > One wonders who "they" think is going to pay an
      > outrageous prices for "gospelthomas.com", incidentally.

      Whoever got the name was apparently a domain-name
      speculator, since they didn't make use of it, but put it
      up for sale with a company called 'Sedo', that auctions
      off domain-names, claiming to have over 5 million of
      them. (Maybe Sedo itself got the name by putting in a
      back-order for it even as Peter was using it. When he
      failed to pay the annual fee on time, the next requestor
      on backorder got it.) The interesting thing to me is that
      Sedo uses _previous traffic_ to the site as a selling-
      point - as if whoever buys the name could count on that
      same amount of traffic no matter what the content!

      Regards,
      Mike Grondin
    • Michael Grondin
      ... Bearing this and other considerations in mind, I ve decided to delete the duplicate files with lower-case names from my site. The other considerations
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 11, 2006
        [Peter Kirby wrote]:
        > Canonical names (URLs, not title fields) are important for
        > search engines. If you are thought to be duplicating content,
        > you could be severely penalized by Google.

        Bearing this and other considerations in mind, I've decided
        to delete the duplicate files with lower-case names from my
        site. The "other considerations" are that Google and Yahoo
        search-engines have both picked up 'JOHNSON.HTM' (which
        is my short note), that Google has picked up 'IYERTRAN.HTM'
        (which is the Iyer rendition), and that I've used caps in referring
        to those pages both here and in several private notes.

        Cheers,
        Mike
      • Michael Grondin
        Took a look at Brandon Wason s blog Sitz im Leben tonight. In particular, his entry of July 24th titled Commentaries on the Gospel of Thomas , link as
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 6 11:56 PM
          Took a look at Brandon Wason's blog "Sitz im Leben" tonight.
          In particular, his entry of July 24th titled "Commentaries on the
          Gospel of Thomas", link as follows:

          http://sitzimleben.com/2009/07/24/commentaries-on-the-gospel-of-thomas/

          Brandon starts out by saying:

          "In light of some recent posts on the Gospel of Thomas around the
          blogosphere (Michael Bird, Roger Pearse, and Michael Heiser), I have
          put together a short annotated bibliography of commentaries on this text."

          The Michael Bird reference has been mentioned previously here, and
          I've linked to some of Roger Pearse's stuff, so I knew about him*, but I
          hadn't heard of Michael Heiser before, so I followed the link in the above
          sentence. Didn't learn much about Heiser, and wasn't too impressed
          with the referenced item (which links to a 2006 paper by Nick Perrin,
          which Heiser calls "a recent article"), but at the end of it was a thingy
          called 'Technorati tags' which I'd never seen before. Curious, I clicked
          on the "Technorati tag" for Gospel of Thomas. It wasn't what I expected.
          What I had expected was the kind of tag that most blogs have, which
          brings up all the entries in that blog for the tagged subject (depending
          on the consistency of the individual blogger). The Technorati tag, though,
          brings up tagged stuff on technorati.com, which isn't under the control
          of the blogger. The "stuff" includes links to blog entries and videos.
          Among the videos was the following, which I found rather good, and so
          am passing along:

          http://technorati.com/videos/youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dl9ocv9AJI88

          The 9-minute clip appears to be a professional production, but I couldn't
          find any date or producer listed. The "talking heads" are Stephen Emmel
          and Bart Ehrman, and the clip features some nice views of the manuscript.
          It seems to have come from YouTube, since one can click on the words
          'YouTube' within the Technorati video screen and be taken to a somewhat
          larger video screen on YouTube which shows the same thing.

          I should mention that I looked at a couple other videos, but wasn't
          impressed enough to recommend them. If anyone finds one they think
          is well-done and informative, please pass it along so we all can take a
          look at it. I may add links to these on my website.

          Cheers,
          Mike Grondin

          *Roger Pearse is mentioned in James Robinson's book on the Gospel
          of Judas. Roger had suggested on his website that the Tchakos Codex,
          which contains the Gospel of Judas, might have been a missing 13th codex
          from Nag Hammadi. In his Judas book, Robinson corrected him, saying
          that there wasn't any missing 13th codex. Unfortunately, Robinson didn't
          acknowledge that he himself had been at least partially responsible for
          speculation about the number of Nag Hammadi codices, in his various
          writings up to that point. Indeed, I ran across a YouTube video featuring a
          youngish James Robinson saying that the Egyptian peasants who made
          the Nag Hammadi find couldn't divide up "the 13 books" evenly among
          the eight of them. (That was perhaps before Robinson determined that
          the so-called 'Codex XIII' wasn't part of a codex that had been put in
          the jar, but was rather a single tractate that had been removed from a
          codex when the jar was being packed, and was inserted into Codex VI.
          BTW, Roger accepted Robinson's correction.)
        • Judy Redman
          Mike, The video you found is part of a BBCFour (ie part of the British Broadcasting Commission) TV program, so it s definitely of professional quality. It has
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 7 4:11 AM
            Mike,

            The video you found is part of a BBCFour (ie part of the British
            Broadcasting Commission) TV program, so it's definitely of professional
            quality. It has definitely not been put up on YouTube by the BBC, though -
            doesn't have any intro or credits to say who the man in the hat is etc. It's
            most likely to have been taped off the TV, edited and uploaded, but the
            BBCFour logo can still be seen in the top left of the picture.

            It's an interesting video. It struck me as odd, though, that the man in the
            hat said that we could tell from the fact that so many fragments had been
            found that it was widely distributed. I would have thought that compared
            with the number of fragments of the Synoptics, the number of fragments of
            Thomas was miniscule and not widely distributed at all.

            A little detective work reveals that the man in the hat is Rev Peter
            Owen-Jones, an advertising executive turned Anglican priest. It is taken
            from a series that he did for the BBC on "The Lost Gospels" where he talks
            about the other early gospels and the different kinds of Christianity that
            they represent. The first part can be seen at
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-L7cQ3BrD5U&feature=related In it, he and
            Bart Ehrman go to the Hummra Dam cliffs where the Nag Hammadi library was
            found and Ehrman tells the story of the discover of the library. It's highly
            likely that you can buy a legal copy of it. :-)

            I was aware of Technorati, but haven't previously looked around it to see
            how they tag things. Thanks.

            Judy


            --
            Rev Judy Redman
            Uniting Church Chaplain
            University of New England
            Armidale 2351 Australia
            ph: +61 2 6773 3739
            fax: +61 2 6773 3749
            web: http://www.une.edu.au/chaplaincy/uniting/ and
            http://blog.une.edu.au/unitingchaplaincy/
            email: jredman@...

            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: gthomas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gthomas@yahoogroups.com] On
            > Behalf Of Michael Grondin
            > Sent: Friday, 7 August 2009 4:57 PM
            > To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [GTh] Adventures in Cyberspace
            >
            > Took a look at Brandon Wason's blog "Sitz im Leben" tonight.
            > In particular, his entry of July 24th titled "Commentaries on the
            > Gospel of Thomas", link as follows:
            >
            > http://sitzimleben.com/2009/07/24/commentaries-on-the-gospel-of-thomas/
            >
            > Brandon starts out by saying:
            >
            > "In light of some recent posts on the Gospel of Thomas around the
            > blogosphere (Michael Bird, Roger Pearse, and Michael Heiser), I have
            > put together a short annotated bibliography of commentaries on this
            > text."
            >
            > The Michael Bird reference has been mentioned previously here, and
            > I've linked to some of Roger Pearse's stuff, so I knew about him*, but
            > I
            > hadn't heard of Michael Heiser before, so I followed the link in the
            > above
            > sentence. Didn't learn much about Heiser, and wasn't too impressed
            > with the referenced item (which links to a 2006 paper by Nick Perrin,
            > which Heiser calls "a recent article"), but at the end of it was a
            > thingy
            > called 'Technorati tags' which I'd never seen before. Curious, I
            > clicked
            > on the "Technorati tag" for Gospel of Thomas. It wasn't what I
            > expected.
            > What I had expected was the kind of tag that most blogs have, which
            > brings up all the entries in that blog for the tagged subject
            > (depending
            > on the consistency of the individual blogger). The Technorati tag,
            > though,
            > brings up tagged stuff on technorati.com, which isn't under the control
            > of the blogger. The "stuff" includes links to blog entries and videos.
            > Among the videos was the following, which I found rather good, and so
            > am passing along:
            >
            > http://technorati.com/videos/youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dl9ocv9AJI88
            >
            > The 9-minute clip appears to be a professional production, but I
            > couldn't
            > find any date or producer listed. The "talking heads" are Stephen Emmel
            > and Bart Ehrman, and the clip features some nice views of the
            > manuscript.
            > It seems to have come from YouTube, since one can click on the words
            > 'YouTube' within the Technorati video screen and be taken to a somewhat
            > larger video screen on YouTube which shows the same thing.
            >
            > I should mention that I looked at a couple other videos, but wasn't
            > impressed enough to recommend them. If anyone finds one they think
            > is well-done and informative, please pass it along so we all can take a
            > look at it. I may add links to these on my website.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Mike Grondin
            >
            > *Roger Pearse is mentioned in James Robinson's book on the Gospel
            > of Judas. Roger had suggested on his website that the Tchakos Codex,
            > which contains the Gospel of Judas, might have been a missing 13th
            > codex
            > from Nag Hammadi. In his Judas book, Robinson corrected him, saying
            > that there wasn't any missing 13th codex. Unfortunately, Robinson
            > didn't
            > acknowledge that he himself had been at least partially responsible for
            > speculation about the number of Nag Hammadi codices, in his various
            > writings up to that point. Indeed, I ran across a YouTube video
            > featuring a
            > youngish James Robinson saying that the Egyptian peasants who made
            > the Nag Hammadi find couldn't divide up "the 13 books" evenly among
            > the eight of them. (That was perhaps before Robinson determined that
            > the so-called 'Codex XIII' wasn't part of a codex that had been put in
            > the jar, but was rather a single tractate that had been removed from a
            > codex when the jar was being packed, and was inserted into Codex VI.
            > BTW, Roger accepted Robinson's correction.)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Gospel of Thomas Homepage: http://home.epix.net/~miser17/Thomas.html
            > Interlinear translation:
            > http://www.geocities.com/mwgrondin/x_transl.htm
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • Judy Redman
            Sorry folks, I hit send before I trimmed the unnecessary text from my response to Mike s post. Even moderators make mistakes, but ours go straight through to
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 7 3:19 PM
              Sorry folks,

              I hit send before I trimmed the unnecessary text from my response to Mike's
              post.

              Even moderators make mistakes, but ours go straight through to the list. :-)

              Judy

              --
              Rev Judy Redman
              Uniting Church Chaplain
              University of New England
              Armidale 2351 Australia
              ph: +61 2 6773 3739
              fax: +61 2 6773 3749
              web: http://www.une.edu.au/chaplaincy/uniting/ and
              http://blog.une.edu.au/unitingchaplaincy/
              email: jredman@...
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