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Re: [GTh] Body vs Flesh

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  • fmmccoy
    ... From: Judy Redman To: Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2005 6:58 AM Subject: RE: [GTh] Body vs Flesh (snip)
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 7, 2005
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Judy Redman" <jredman@...>
      To: <gthomas@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2005 6:58 AM
      Subject: RE: [GTh] Body vs Flesh

      (snip)

      (Frank McCoy)
      > > THE TWO BASIC CLASSES OF HUMAN BEINGS
      > >
      > > In Thomas thought, while a human being apparently has three
      > > basic aspects, there apparently are two basic classes of human beings.
      > >
      > > Let us look at T7, "Blessed is the lion which becomes man
      > > when consumed by man; and cursed is the man whom the lion
      > > comsumes, and the lion becomes man."
      > >
      > > Here, the man who consumes the lion in the beginning of this
      > > passage and the man who consumes the lion in the ending of
      > > this passage are two different men. The first is the inner
      > > man and it is the spirit. The second is the outer man and it
      > > is the body of flesh.

      (Judy Redman)
      > I am not sure that I quite follow your reasoning here, but if it is based
      on
      > the first sentence of the above para, there is a problem, since the first
      > man *eats* the lion, whereas the second man *is eaten by* the lion. Your
      > first sentence suggests that the man is doing the eating in both cases.

      Hi Judy!

      Ouch! I apologize for being losing my focus and making a very sloppy error.

      Here is, hopefully, an explanation without as egregious a gaffe.

      There are three mentions of "man" in T7. In the first two mentions, the
      "man" is the "inner man" of the spirit. In the last mention, the "man" is
      the "outer man" of the body of flesh. As for the "lion", it is the psyche.

      Compare II Cor. 4:16, where Paul states, "Therefore we do not lose heart,
      but if indeed our outward man is being decayed, yet our inward man is being
      renewed day by day. Here, I suggest, the outward man is the body of flesh,
      while the inward man is the spirit.

      Let us now turn to the first part of T7, "Blessed is the lion which becomes
      man when consumed by man;...".

      Here, the psyche is absorbed by the spirit, thereby becoming (a part of)
      this inner man. This psyche is blessed because it, thereby, shares in the
      potential immortality of the spirit.

      Next, let us turn to the last part of T7, "And cursed is the man whom the
      lion comsumes, and the lion becomes man."

      This relates to a two-step process. In the first step, the inner man of the
      spirit is absorbed by the psyche. In the second step,. the psyche, in turn,
      is absorbed by the outer man of the body of flesh, thereby becoming (a part
      of) this outer man. This inner man of the spirit is cursed because it ends
      up becoming (a part of) the outer man of the body of flesh, which is mortal,
      and, therefore, this inner man of the spirit loses its potential for being
      immortal.

      (snip)

      (Judy)
      > I like simple, rather than complex, which is why I am interested in your
      > posts about sources without Q, although I haven't had a chance to read
      them
      > through carefully.

      Yes, Ockham's razor definitely comes into play here. Why postulate Q when
      it is unnecesary to do so?

      Regards,

      Frank McCoy
      1905 N. English Apt. 15
      Maplewood, MN USA 55109
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