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Philip (was Re: [GTh] Thomas #43)

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  • Jim Bauer
    ... Two questions: 1) Has anyone who knows both Coptic and math ever done a factor analysis of these two gospels? If not, someone should undertake it.
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 5, 2003
      Mike Grondin writes:
      > Well, I think that one *should* question whether Thomas meant
      > "passers-by", especially in light of the fact that the Gospel of Philip -
      > the author(s) of which seem familiar with, and sympathetic to, Thomas -
      > refer to a time "when we were Hebrews" - a time *past*, mind you. I find it
      > difficult to believe that GPh would so directly contravene one of the most
      > important - if not THE most important - injunctions in GTh. But if the
      > Schoedel reading is in view, "coming into being" as Christians while they
      > were "passing away" as Hebrews is fully consistent with Th42. In addition
      > to that, however, I think that "Come into being as you pass away" is more
      > internally consistent with other Thomas themes than is "Become passers-by".

      Two questions: 1) Has anyone who knows both Coptic and math ever done a
      factor analysis of these two gospels? If not, someone should undertake it.
      Factor analyses look for common elements between groups (of just about
      anything), and such a study might help determine if Philip was, indeed,
      derivative.

      2) Philip says, "May our whole offering obtain salt, for without salt, no
      offering is acceptable. But this Sophie who was called barren is the Mother
      of Angels". The medieval alchemists used to speak of "sophic sal", the
      "salt of wisdom". Could this be an ancestral form of it? I asked historian
      of science Allen Debus about it a couple years back, and he commented, "It
      would depend on how well the Gospel of Philip was known in classical
      antiquity". I'm also wondering whether the statement could be Hermetic, but
      I'm not terribly familiar with that era of alchemy.

      Jim Bauer
      Havre, MT
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