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Re: [GTh] Lions

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  • Michael Mozina
    Tom This is just one possibility but it typifies the Thomas methodology of being able to give the sayings multiple interpretations and combine sayings with
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 28, 2002
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      Tom>>This is just one possibility but it typifies the Thomas methodology of
      being able to give the sayings multiple interpretations and combine sayings
      with sayings. This appears intentional to me.

      To me as well. You could substitute almost any vice in the place of lion
      (hate), and opposing virtue (love) into the word human and have it make
      sense. There seems to be a reference here to "inner self", and the conflict
      within each of us between what we know is the right thing to do (selfless),
      and what is "selfish". Many of these saying do have multiple "valid"
      interpretations. From my point of view, they often seem to to apply to the
      "inner" self, and the conflict within between selfishness and selflessness,
      pride, vs. humility, love and forgiveness vs. hate and intolerance.

      Michael Mozina
      Mt. Shasta, CA
    • Michael Mozina
      ... consideration of the self as it relates to society. This shows magnificent insight into sociodynamics which can actually be applied. This is
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 29, 2002
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        Tom Saunders writes:
        > The GTh seems to not only reference the inner self but there is
        consideration of the 'self' as it relates to society. This shows
        magnificent insight into sociodynamics which can actually be applied. This
        is definitely outside the box in the belief that others, outside the first
        Christian Jewish culture, could become Christian. It connotes a sameness
        for the inner self in all of us.

        I agree. There do seem to be some pervasive themes in these sayings: Unity
        in God, and "inner" enlightenment being two primary themes as I see it.
        Interestingly enough, these sayings are as applicable to the reader of
        today, some 2000 years later, as they were to the audience to which they
        were first spoken. As you point out, the cultural "tagging" going on
        wasn't that severe, and these sayings remain applicable to someone in our
        culture today as well as to those in his original audience. I find that
        remarkable and fascinating.

        >The closest I have come to figuring out the scheme in Thomas as far as it
        applies to the self is to relate 'states of grace' the inner self, the
        social self, and the spiritual self to the text. Some of the sayings
        reflect all three, and some one or two. There could be a pattern, but it is
        awfully easy to make another arrangement of Thomas, which turns out as valid
        as the next.

        I agree with that thinking. I also think there's a pervasive theme here
        about our ultimate unity in God as well, and how this affects our
        relationship to the community in an *ETERNAL* sense.
      • Michael Mozina
        I m curious what might be a good reference source that talks about literacy rates in Jerusalem during the early first century. I keep hearing that it was very
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 2, 2002
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          I'm curious what might be a good reference source that talks about literacy
          rates in Jerusalem during the early first century. I keep hearing that it
          was very low, but I've yet to hear a lot of hard facts to support these
          numbers.

          Michael Mozina
          Mt. Shasta, CA
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