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Re: [gthomas] Re: The "House" of Logion 71

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  • odell mcguire
    ... be there for what we would nowadays regard as secular reasons, or for religious reasons which had nothing to do with Torah, and would continue to live,
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 16, 2000
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      RS BRENCHLY wrote:
      >> This makes good sense. Doubtless the people in the 'assembly of
      >freedmen' had a variety of motives for being in Jerusalem. Some would
      be there for what we would nowadays regard as 'secular' reasons, or for
      religious reasons which had nothing to do with Torah, and would continue to
      live, as far as possible, in the manner they had been accustomed to in the
      Diaspora. This group would be marginalised within Jerusalem, might well be seen
      as dodgy on Torah observance, and if some of them had been attracted to the
      Jesus movement, could have produced a Stephen. I am assuming, incidentally, that
      J's interests did not lie in the details of Torah observance, and thus there was
      room for those with a variety of views among his< followers.<<

      >Other Hellenists would have been more like Saul/Paul; hardliners who
      were attracted by Torah-observant groups, who might well have been attracted to
      Jerusalem for that very reason. If both types were present within the Hellenist
      community, quarrels of the type described could easily follow, especially if
      some of them joined a group which was critical of the Temple, which would add
      further fuel to a mix which would have been
      inflammable already.<

      Regards, Robert Brenchley<

      Thanks for the interest. I share your views more or less fully on this. I
      wrote a post either to this list or Crosstalk a couple weeks ago in which I
      emphasized the likelihood of great variability of views vis a vis the law among
      freed Jews coming to Jerusalem from various diaspora localities. I also
      speculated that an antilegalism party had probably formed among them before J
      was ever known in that town. Etc. But I agree with you. Most (but not quite)
      all of the evidence suggests that HJ was no partisan of the law. The 7, all with
      Greek names and presumably former diaspora Jews belonging to this antilegal
      faction, quickly made cause with the Galilean apostles, received their
      commission to minister to Greek speaking believers, and the rest of their story
      is told with a fair degree of accuracy in Acts6.1-9.30. Thats my take on it and
      yours sounds much the same.
      --
      Best wishes, Odell

      Odell McGuire
      omcguire@...
      Prof. Geology Em., W&L
      Lexington, VA
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