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Re: [gthomas] Re: context of GOT

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  • joe lieb
    Yuri Kuchinsky wrote: Joe, I agree with you that 1c and later Judaism was quite attractive to Gentiles. There s this whole debate (on Loisy-list) about
    Message 1 of 7 , May 5, 2000
      Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
      Joe, I agree with you that 1c and later Judaism was quite attractive to
      Gentiles. There's this whole debate (on Loisy-list) about God-fearers that is quite relevant here.

      Yuri,
      Thank you for inviting me to share in the debate on Loisy list. I have checked out some archives and it looks interesting. That list deals with all of biblical history. Currently I am concentrating on Gospels of Mathew and Thomas and so my energies are being focused on Thomas egroup.
      I agree with you that Judaism was quite widespread around the time of the birth of Christianity. And indeed that is how I explain many of the Jewish references in Mathew. I brought this topic up in order to clarify the context of Thomas. Mathew was intended to be universal in appeal whereas Thomas had a more specialised appeal. When egroup members criticised my argument by saying that Mathew was intended for Jews alone I vigorously defended my original assertion because it was not just a flippant remark.
      The question of how many Jews there were in the audience of Mathew or of Thomas does not interest me. Rather I am trying to understand what sort of person the preacher was aiming at. It seems to me that 'Thomas' was deliberately trying to impress the contemplative type of person. Such people can be found amongst Christians, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, Moslems, animists and atheists but rarely form a majority in any given crowd.

      Regards,
      - Joe.



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    • Jack Kilmon
      ... Perhaps a factor that causes much misunderstanding of GoT is our only complete text being found in a gnostic context. The tendency, therefore is to
      Message 2 of 7 , May 5, 2000
        joe lieb wrote:
        > The question of how many Jews there were in the audience of Mathew or of Thomas does not interest me. Rather I am trying to understand what sort of person the preacher was aiming at. It seems to me that 'Thomas' was deliberately trying to impress the contemplative type of person. Such people can be found amongst Christians, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, Moslems, animists and atheists but rarely form a majority in any given crowd.

        Perhaps a factor that causes much misunderstanding of GoT is our only
        complete
        text being found in a gnostic context. The tendency, therefore is to
        interpret various logia as gnostic. I would claim that GoT is an
        ascetic
        work that could easily have fit, neutrally, in a gnostic library. I wont
        argue an occasional gnostic "tweak" in the verbiage of Coptic Thomas but
        I would not identify GoT as a gnostic text. Its asceticism, therfore,
        would have me agree with your statement.


        Jack

        --
        ______________________________________________

        taybutheh d'maran yeshua masheecha am kulkon

        Jack Kilmon
        jkilmon@...

        http://www.historian.net

        sharing a meal for free.
        http://www.thehungersite.com/
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