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May I introduce myself

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  • didymus84@yahoo.com
    My name is Thomas, and for that reason i chose long ago to use didymus as my nickname; not in any pride or identification. About the only thing i share with
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2000
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      My name is Thomas, and for that reason i chose long ago to use
      didymus as my nickname; not in any pride or identification. About the
      only thing i share with Thomas is that i often need to see things
      with my "own eyes".
      I am pretty much a self-taught student. I learned my Latin the hard
      way-4 years of Catholic high school. Shortly after that i became a
      self-named christian agnostic. I believed/believe in Yeshua but not
      sure of much else. After over 25 years of self study i joined a
      Lutheran, Missouri Synod church. For many reasons, after 8 years we
      parted company. I continue my own research. I am particularly
      interested in the ante-Nicene church. I am curious as to how various
      dogmas and accepted beliefs came into being. In particular interest
      is how the role of women changed so drastically from the days of
      Lydia, Phoebe, Prisca, and Junias to the misogynistic church of
      Origen and Tertullian.
      I believe the accepted canon of the New Testament to be inspired
      writings. I also believe that there is a lot of Truth in the GOT and
      other so-called apocryphal writings.
      I would like to address two items i see being discussed-my two
      cents worth.
      I believe Matthews gospel to be indeed universal in intent. The
      parable of the tenants and the parable of the wedding banquet both
      illustrate this universality. In Matt27:46 the author translates
      Yeshua's Aramaic into Greek. If the readers were all Jews, there
      would be little need for this translation from the lingua franca of
      even the Jews of the Dispersion. Secondly, the Great Commission
      orders them to "make disciples of all nations" not just the Jews.
      The opening sentences of Luke's gospel refers to many accounts of
      what had happened among them. Was he talking about Q or other
      "sayings gospels"-perhaps. Obviously there many who had partaken the
      task of writing about Yeshua. Still Luke felt compelled to write an
      "orderly account". Will these other accounts ever be found? One
      hundred years ago, scholars were still arguing over the GOT. The Nag
      Hammadi library has given us what they did not have. Who can say what
      else may be found?
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