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[gthomas] Re: Passing Away(#42)

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  • odell mcguire
    ... I see. But that doesn t do much to change the rest of what I wrote. GINOMAI, like you say of the Coptic verb, has the absolute sense, without inflection
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 6, 2000
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      Michael Grondin wrote:

      > At 09:20 PM 02/05/00 +0000, odell mcguire wrote:
      > >I guess what you're saying here is that there is no other reason
      > >to think the second term in the Coptic, which has the verb PARAGE
      > >at its core, is a noun except that the first term 'become' requires an
      > object.
      >
      > No, no, no. I'm not saying that the first term ('shope') requires an
      > object, but rather that when it doesn't have one (as I don't believe it
      > does in #42), it doesn't make sense to translate it as 'become'. Rather, it
      > can stand on its own as the imperative "Come into being", which I take to
      > be modified in #42 by the second verb "as/while you are passing away",
      > which specifies the time at or during which the imperative is to be performed.

      I see. But that doesn't do much to change the rest of what I wrote. GINOMAI, like you
      say of the Coptic verb, has the absolute sense, without inflection or object: *come
      into being*. So I feel sure that GINOMAI, which is as common as dirt in the NT
      anyway, stands behind the Coptic. Otherwise I would not have attempted the
      retranslation. But Greek verbs do not come without inflection, and the only
      imperative attested in my NT glossary is in the passive voice; in fact GINOMAI is a
      deponent verb, does not have, strictly speaking, an active voice; only a middle and a
      passive. So, 'come into being' as a hard command is a little harsh for the word. Its
      like the command "Be born." Rather, GINOMAI has an imperative of the type: "Let them
      eat cake" or "Give yourself a break" or even "Let there be light". But I'm almost as
      tired of lecturing as you are of hearing it. I think "Let youselves come into being as
      you pass by" (away?) or "Become yourselves- - " are a shade truer to the Greek as I
      have written it.
      I think Joe Baxter's post of this morning has some additional and interesting
      insights into this saying, but I haven't had time tofully digest them.

      Best wishes, Odell

      Odell McGuire
      omcguire@...
      Prof. Geology Em., W&L
      Lexington, VA
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