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[gthomas] Re: Deification in GOT:life/death

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  • Yuri Kuchinsky
    Dear Tom Kopecek, What you wrote about deification in GOT surely makes sense. Certainly these elements in GOT would have been quite appealing to the monks who
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1 12:32 PM
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      Dear Tom Kopecek,

      What you wrote about deification in GOT surely makes sense. Certainly
      these elements in GOT would have been quite appealing to the monks who
      presumably transmitted it. But what I was trying to do was to consider a
      broader question, namely, Are we justified in seeing GOT as primarily a
      religious document, as opposed to seeing is as some kind of a secular
      philosophical tract? So I think you may agree with me that GOT does not
      look like a work of secular philosophy.

      But if we see GOT as primarily a religious work, then the next question is
      whether or not it can be seen as a work consistent with traditional
      Judaism. I think it is, and the evidence that you gave in another context
      from the Didache and the pseudo-Clementines seems to provide support for
      this. So do you agree with me that, if we set aside some possibly later
      additions, GOT is quite consistent with traditional Judaism?

      Now, regarding what you described as the "trinitarian" verse 30, can this
      verse be seen as a criticism of trinitarianism that emerged in later
      Christian theology, thus implying that its author was more inclined to
      traditional Jewish monotheism?

      Regards,

      Yuri.

      Yuri Kuchinsky -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku

      "It is so much easier to assume than to prove; it is so much less painful
      to believe than to doubt; there is such a charm in the repose of
      prejudice, when no discordant voice jars upon the harmony of belief; there
      is such a thrilling pang when cherished dreams are scattered, and old
      creeds abandoned, that it is not surprising that men close their eyes to
      the unwelcome light" -- W.E.H. Lecky (A History of Rationalism)
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