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[gthomas] Q2 and Thomas part 3

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  • Paul Miller
    From: Stevan Davies To: crosstalk@info.harpercollins.com Date: Mon, 8 Apr 1996 15:34:27 +0000Subject: Re: Q2 and Thomas
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 18, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      From: "Stevan Davies" <miser17@...>To: crosstalk@...
      Date: Mon, 8 Apr 1996 15:34:27 +0000Subject: Re: Q2 and
      Thomas
      Thank you to Bill Arnal. Once I've read his letter a couple
      more times I'll be considerably more knowledgable about
      the sayings traditions than I was when I got up this morning.
      And I don't mean that sarcastically!
      But let's leave Klop and Mack aside and bring ol' Marcus Borg
      on stage for awhile. He himself believes, and he has insisted in
      print that it is the consensus among scholars, that
      Jesus was not an apocalypticist and therefore sayings such as the
      future Son of Man sayings are later creations.
      However, if it is the case that Q2 is pulling those sayings out of
      existing tradition rather than making them up only two possibilities
      occur to me.1. Jesus said them.
      2. There was some other community, not the Q folks, who
      had some sort of message that was rejected by the masses
      and this peeved them to such a degree that they made up the apoc. sayings.
      But this is a bit much, as it would mean
      that the complicated arguments that Mack makes to show the
      mindset of the frustrated Q folks applied also to some other
      otherwise unknown group who did make up such sayings
      at a period quite considerably earlier than Q2 such that their
      sayings became an accepted part of the oral tradition from
      which Q2 took its stuff when the Q folks also got frustrated.
      So, evidently, there was a collection of rather savage
      Kingdom of God as vengeance sayings circulating prior to
      Q2. Wouldn't that imply pretty strongly that Q1 would have
      known them but deliberately chose to leave them out?
      The only other alternative is that they came into being between
      the time of Q1 and Q2 in some other community than Q. Subsequently
      those sayings, or at least their ideology, was picked up by Q and
      Mt Mk Lk Pl and it was known to Jn and Th.
      If the sayings derive from Jesus we do have reason to think
      that Thomas knew of that sort of saying and left them out.
      If Q1 also did so then there may be interesting evidence of a somewhat
      widespread pre-synoptic tendency to reject one principal element
      of Jesus' messageStage one: The eschatological Jesus 30AD
      Stage two: Q1/Th rejection of the eschatological Jesus 50AD
      Stage three: Q2 etc. reaffirmation of the eschatological Jesus 60AD
      [Stage four: Re-rejection of the eschatological Jesus 1980AD]
      That would make the Q1/Thomas stage a particularly
      interesting one to explore, it seems to me. What have we
      got there? A sapientializing of eschatology followed by
      an eschatologizing of the sapiential? That sounds silly,
      but it is what you are left with, I think, if you assume that Q
      didn't make up the Q2 eschatological sayings.
      So, enlighten me WA or somebody. Where did the Q style
      day of the Son of Man sayings come from? The Q people
      didn't make them up (Klop) and Jesus didn't make them up
      (Borg). Or did Jesus make them up? Isn't that the simplest
      hypothesis that fits the evidence, even Klop's Q1/Q2 evidence?
      But even those who think J spoke of a coming Kingdom in some
      sense or other do NOT usually prefer to think that the Kingdom
      expected to be anything like what the Q sayings say it will be like,
      i.e. fire and brimstone and flood and lightning and woe unto Bethsaida
      and Capurnaum cast into hell, and I will come on the clouds with the
      angels whilst the stars fall from their spheres and woe unto her
      who is with child in those days.
      E.P. Sanders writes in *The Historical Figure of Jesus*
      "As a desperate measure, people whom this [Jesus' eschatological
      message] makes uncomfortable can say that everybody
      misunderstood Jesus completely. He really wanted economic and social reform.
      The disciples dropped that part of his teaching and made up sayings
      about the future kingdom of God - which they then had to start
      retracting, since the kingdom did not arrive. This assumes that we
      can 'know' things for which there is no evidence, while
      simultaneously 'knowing' that the evidence we have is based on total
      incomprehension. Such views merely show the triumph of wishful
      thinking." (page 183).
      I think on 'crosstalk' this would be regarded as a 'flame' by
      Sanders against Crossan and Borg and Kaylor and the JSem consensus.
      So did Jesus offer the view that God would kill everyone on
      earth except those who agreed with Jesus?
      Or was this a later invention and, if so, by whom and why?What's going on
      here?
      Steve

      Date: Mon, 8 Apr 1996 22:52:47 -0400 (EDT)
      From: William Arnal <warnal@...>
      To: Stevan Davies <miser17@...>
      Subject: Re: Q2 and Thomas

      On Mon, 8 Apr 1996, Stevan Davies wrote:

      > But let's leave Klop and Mack aside and bring ol' Marcus Borg
      > on stage for awhile. He himself believes, and he has insisted in
      > print that it is the consensus among scholars, that
      > Jesus was not an apocalypticist and therefore sayings such as the
      > future Son of Man sayings are later creations.

      At the risk of giving offense again, Borg's assertion here is CRAPOLA.
      There's no such consensus. Borg just uses this to escape having to make
      the argument himself. I figure that's just sheer laziness. The really
      weird thing is, Borg touts this "consensus" without himself, I believe,
      accepting Q's stratification. Go figure.

      > So, evidently, there was a collection of rather savage
      > Kingdom of God as vengeance sayings circulating prior to
      > Q2. Wouldn't that imply pretty strongly that Q1 would have
      > known them but deliberately chose to leave them out?
      >
      > The only other alternative is that they came into being between
      > the time of Q1 and Q2 in some other community than Q. Subsequently
      > those sayings, or at least their ideology, was picked up by Q and
      > Mt Mk Lk Pl and it was known to Jn and Th.

      I don't find this as difficult a scenario as you evidently do. Who knows
      how much time elasped between Q1 and Q2? Presumably, there could be an
      oral tradition developing between the two, in which many of these sayings=

      were composed. And Q2 redaction probably supplied some more. The other
      thing is that Q2's ideology did not emerge out of thin air. Polemic due
      to frustration is a way of explaining why Q2 utilized an apocalyptic
      ideology that was "already in the air", but it does not explain why Q2
      chose THIS vehicle as opposed to a range of others that might also have
      sufficed (and in fact it played with several: the invocation of John, the=

      deuteronomistic scheme, the prophets, Wisdom personfied, etc.). For it to=

      have occurred to the Q2 redactor that apocalypticism was a good way to
      rationalize the Jesus traditions, it's quite possible a nudge in this
      direction was needed. Why not say that nudge was the fact that the oral
      tradition at this point was already doing so to some degree, but with
      slightly less choler than Q2 employed? So it's not like Q2 INVENTED
      apocalypticism (as I've said before), and so we're spared of the
      embarrassment of having to explain why Q2, which was not a source for
      Thomas, John, Mark, etc., managed to disseminate its ideology all over
      the place anyhow. And if this strikes one as GROSSLY hypothetical, let me=

      point out that it's not much different than saying that e.g., Mark is
      redactionally interested in portraying Jesus as the Son of God, even
      though this is a theme that was already SECONDARILY present in the
      tradition.

      > So, enlighten me WA or somebody. Where did the Q style
      > day of the Son of Man sayings come from? The Q people
      > didn't make them up (Klop) and Jesus didn't make them up
      > (Borg). Or did Jesus make them up? Isn't that the simplest
      > hypothesis that fits the evidence, even Klop's Q1/Q2 evidence?

      Schurmann ( along time ago): They were made up somewhere in between. If
      we're going to assume a creative oral tradiotion, why balk at this?

      But let's look at the Son of Man sayings in Q. I'll just list references,=

      rather than citing the text in full (I'm lazier than Davies on this
      score!), and I'll assume for the sake of argument that "Son of Man" is
      original Q even if only one evangelist using this specific wording. They
      are:

      Q 6:22. This text is from the FIRST layer of Q. Mack puts it in Q2, but
      sloppily and for all the wrong reasons. If anyone wants to dispute me on
      this, I'll argue it, but for now, all I'll just hope y'all will take my
      word for it. There is a parallel to this text in Thomas (68, 69), but the=

      Thomas parallel does not contain reference to Son of Man. The term is
      used as a title for Jesus himself.

      Q 7:34: This is from Q2. There is not Thomas parallel. The term is used
      as a title for Jesus himself, specifically NOT the resurrected or
      returning Jesus.

      Q 9:58: This is from the FIRST layer of Q. The reference in Q is to
      either Jesus as a human being, or to human beings in general. Therfe is a=

      Thomas parallel (86), and it is the ONLY parallel in Thomas with which
      used shares a reference to "Son of man".

      Q 11:30: This is Q2, and refers to the Son of Man as a Jonah-like sign
      for "this generation." This is probably apocalyptic for Q, given its
      context, but the saying itself does not require an apocalyptic
      interpretation. And it is unclear whether the son of man refers to Jesus
      being a prophet of repentance, and acting as a "sign" in that sense, or
      whether it refers to Son of Man as judge, who will serve as a
      self-evidence "sign." There is no parallel in Thomas.

      Q 12:8: Q2, I think, with no Thomas parallels. This is the
      "eschatological correlative" -- whoever confesses Jesus, the Son of Man
      with confess in heaven. Again, this is only apocalyptic in context, it
      assumes something of a disparity between Jesus himself and this son of
      man figure, and does not require an apocalyptic judgement scene. In many
      ways, it is little different from "whoever knows me knows him who sent
      me," etc.

      Q 12:10: Q2, an absolutely incomprehensible saying about blasphemy against
      the Son of Man. It LOOKS like the term refers to Jesus here, since a
      CONTRAST is made with the spirit, in which case the saying is decidely NOT
      apocalyptic. There is a Thomas parallel (44), which seems to retain the
      same sense as Q, but which does not refer to "the son of man", only to
      "the son".

      Q 12:40: Q2. No one knows the hour of the coming of the Son of Man.
      Oddly, there is a Thomas parallel here (21, 103; as well as: 1 Thess
      5:1-2, Mark 13:35, 2 Peter 3:10, Rev 16:15!). NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THESE
      PARALLELS REFERS TO THE SON OF MAN (wow!). Many of the parallels are
      apocalyptic without using the son of man terminology, while Thomas is not=

      apocalyptic at all: it's more a warning to know what to expect, and be
      prepared, much like the parable of the assassin.

      Q 17:24, 26, 30: all from Q2, no Thomas parallels, all refer to the
      PAROUSIA of the Son of man and are clearly apocalyptic. Equally clearly,
      they all were part of the little apocalyptic speech which gets
      incorporated into Q at this point.

      Q 22:28: Q2, possibly apocalyptic, refers to the exaltation of the Son
      of man and the judging activity of his followers. It's rather muted,
      though. No Thomas parallel.

      I have not attempted to tabulate Marcan parallels to these, but it could
      be done easily enough.

      Stats for Thomas: 1. Absolute use of *prome* (The Man): 7 (?), 8 (as
      replacement for "kingdom," apparently). 2. Son of man, singular: #86
      (used in sense of "human being," but perhaps with connotation of
      "righteous" human being, or perhaps Jesus himself). 3. "Sons of man": 28,=

      106: sense is of saved human beings in the second case, humans generally
      in the first. #86 is the only parallel with "son of man," #106 is
      paralleled in the synoptics, but without this term.

      SO: where does all this tedium lead us? It suggests several things to me:=

      1. First and foremost, the son of man sayings, even in Q, are not at all
      homogeneous. They mean different things at different times, and do not
      even seem to refer consistently to Jesus. This should be something of a
      tip-off that Q redaction did not create the term, and was not even
      particularly redactionally interested in it: at least not enough to
      smooth out the references and make them consistent.
      2. While the term appears much more frequently in Q2 than in Q1, it does
      occur twice in Q1, and even is used inconsistently in these two
      references. So Q1 already knows of a tendency to call Jesus the son of
      man, certainly in 6:22, maybe in 9:58.
      3. Thomas also emplys the term inconsistently. He uses it much less
      frequently, but does not show an aversion to it. He uses it in places
      where his parallels do not, which suggests that we should be careful
      about talking about a Thomas tendency to delete the term. But he also
      fails to use it in places where his parallels have it. In at least one
      instance (the hour when the theif is coming=A9, the tradition supports
      Thomas against Q -- Son of Man is almost certainly secondary, because no
      other traditions agree in having it.
      3. Only once does the term appear in parallel Q/Thomas material, and
      here with an unclear referent. It is in any case not apocalyptic in
      either source.
      4. The only strongly, unequivocally apocalyptic references to teh Son of
      Man occur in a single cluster, unparalleled in Thomas. I believe (off the=

      top of my head -- I didn't check) that Marks shares some of this
      material, so it's reasonable enough to conclude that at some point,
      pre-Q2, apocalyptic son of man sayings developed.

      In sum: all of this suggests to me what Schurmann already said: that Son
      of Man appears to arise secondarily in the oral tradition (it is only
      VERY infrequently shared in independent parallel material), and yet does
      not appear as part of the redactional interest of Q (or Thomas, for that
      matter; Mark is a different story). But even more importantly, it
      suggests that Son of Man was circulating in the tradition WITHOUT
      apocalyptic connotations. In fact, judging from the instances enumerated,
      most of the time "Son of Man" in Q is either not apocalyptic or is so
      only by virtue of the context in which it appears: with the exception of
      3 instances in chapter 17, "Son of man" in the tradition does not have a
      clear apocalyptic reference. Q, apparently inherited the term, was
      interested enough to interpret it apocalyptically where such a reading
      was fairly obvious already, but was not enough interested to emend it in
      other instances. It's all much more complicated, I guess, than a lot of
      this discussion would imply.

      > Or was this a later invention and, if so, by whom and why?
      > What's going on here?

      I don't know. Do the Son of Man stats I've offered suggest anything more
      specific than what I've said? Or even something contrary (God forbid!) to=

      what I've said? Would it help to work in Marcan parallels and see what
      they tell us? Etc. Agaian, I think this is a case of something arising
      post Jesus and pre documents, and it seems so incredibly inconsistent
      that it's hard to tell what happened. I would suggest that the term "son
      of man" was loaded enough, or mysterious enough, that once it worked its
      way into the tradition, it could be harnessed to a variety of uses. This
      does not prove that the term didn't originate with Jesus or didn't have
      apocalyptic connotations at that point. But it does suggest that the that=

      mere presence of the term prior to documentary redaction does not in
      itself indicate that Jesus was an apocalyptist. This, coupled with the
      remarks I made in response to Maureen's recent post, suggest to me that
      the apocalyptic Jesus is not the OBVIOUS or commonsense view (Sanders
      takes that rhetorically FAR too often IMHO), and requires as much defense=

      and substantial argumentation as the sapiential Jesus.

      Comments?

      And apologies for typos and such; also any failures to make sense -- I was
      interrupted half way through, and tried to pick up my thread again, I'm
      not sure how successfully. I'd apologize for length, too, but anyone who
      has read this far probably doesn't mind anyway.

      later,
      Bill




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