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YG Bungles Badly

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  • Mike Grondin
    In revising a piece of software, the standard procedure is to roll out a beta-version for testing, while retaining the current version. In what must be
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 5, 2013
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      In revising a piece of software, the standard procedure is to roll out a
      beta-version for testing, while retaining the current version. In what must
      be considered the worst case of corporate misjudgement since "the new
      Coke", Yahoogroups has reversed this procedure. It has rolled out a
      god-awful beta version and closed off access to what has worked well.
      The introductory video claims that "All the features you're familiar with
      are still there." No, they aren't, and the proof of that can be found in the
      near-unanimously negative response from users/owners to be found at:
      The YG people keep saying "we're working on that". Hello, that's what
      a beta-version is for - and that's why you keep the current version around
      until the beta-version has been well-tested! I'll be working with it to try
      to do things like getting our picture back, but I'm disgusted with YG.
       
      Mike Grondin
    • Rick Hubbard
      As one person said, Why try to fix something that worked fine? . What is with this outfit. I did hear that the new CEO had been in charge of user experience
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 6, 2013
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        As one person said, "Why try to fix something that worked fine?". What is with this outfit. 

        I did hear that the new CEO had been in charge of "user experience" at Google. Maybe she should spoken a little more with her peers who were in charge of "functionality". 

        Looking at the user comments and YG's responses, it looks like there are a lot more  "under reviews" than "planned" or "fixed". Yeeesh!


        Sent from my iPhone

        On Sep 5, 2013, at 7:15 PM, "Mike Grondin" <mwgrondin@...> wrote:

         

        In revising a piece of software, the standard procedure is to roll out a
        beta-version for testing, while retaining the current version. In what must
        be considered the worst case of corporate misjudgement since "the new
        Coke", Yahoogroups has reversed this procedure. It has rolled out a
        god-awful beta version and closed off access to what has worked well.
        The introductory video claims that "All the features you're familiar with
        are still there." No, they aren't, and the proof of that can be found in the
        near-unanimously negative response from users/owners to be found at:
        The YG people keep saying "we're working on that". Hello, that's what
        a beta-version is for - and that's why you keep the current version around
        until the beta-version has been well-tested! I'll be working with it to try
        to do things like getting our picture back, but I'm disgusted with YG.
         
        Mike Grondin

      • Tom Reynolds
        All-   Based on some of my posts in another thread, Tim Staker recommended a book A History of Christian Thought, Vol 1 by Justo L. Gonzales for me.
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 7, 2013
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          All-
           
          Based on some of my posts in another thread, Tim Staker recommended a book "A History of Christian Thought, Vol 1" by Justo L. Gonzales for me.
          Gonzales dedicates considerable analysis for the period just after the New Testament. To summarize what Gonzales says, Christian thought of that period can be summarized:
          1-Explanation of Christianity in Greek philosophical terms. This was as much apologetics as it was evangelical. The Christians wanted acceptance from the Greek majority.
           
          2-Defense against heresies.  As a group the Christian writers presented a proto-Trinitarian concept against various heresies.
          3-Refutation of opponent’s charges.  Essentially refuting opponent’s charges that Christians were atheists, cannibals, etc.
          4-Development of a moral code.
          Gonzales also summarizes the heresies of the period.
          This viewpoint covers essentially the period between AD95 (Clement of Rome) to about AD 160 (Justin Martyr).
          What I find most interesting is that Gospel of Thomas does not seem to fall into the genre of that period, either from a proto-orthodox or heretical perspective. True, one can interpret individual GTh passages similar to proto-orthodox or heretical views but GTH seems to contain elements of neither the Christian elements summarized above nor a presentation of heretical views of that period.
          The above suggests that GTh is not a product of the dominate Christian thought of that period, either proto-orthodox or heretical.
          Regards,
          Tom Reynolds
           
          .
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