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on HTR delay in publishing "GJW"

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  • Stephen Goranson
    Not really big news, more a confirmation, but AP (in the Boston Globe) reports (Dec. 4) that tests have not been completed to authenticate the papyrus, so K.
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 4, 2012
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      Not really big news, more a confirmation, but AP (in the Boston Globe) reports (Dec. 4) that tests have not been completed "to authenticate the papyrus," so K. King's paper will not be in the January issue.

      http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2012/12/04/jan-publication-jesus-wife-research-unlikely/YEaq6iswC7khagGKrqt12H/story.html

      Stephen Goranson
      www.duke.edu/~goranson
    • Mike Grondin
      Hi Stephen, What I find mysterious is that there s been no mention of the ink test lately. It was originally scheduled for (mid? end?) October, as I understand
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 5, 2012
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        Hi Stephen,
         
        What I find mysterious is that there's been no mention of the ink
        test lately. It was originally scheduled for (mid? end?) October, as
        I understand it. In the Nov 11th Boston Globe article that Tom
        Hickcox noted onlist, Karen King was quoted as saying that she
        was waiting for its results, but here we are 3-4 weeks later, and
        the recent AP article from Harvard Divinity School doesn't even
        mention it. Was it folded into the larger set of authenticity tests?
        Lisa Wangsness, the author of the Boston Globe piece, suggests
        so in her response (nothing confidential in it) to a note I sent her
        today, but it hasn't been confirmed:

        Hi Mike, My understanding is that the testing would begin mid-October but could take a couple of months and may not be ready in time for the Jan. issue of the HTR – and indeed the AP had something yesterday saying that the tests would not be completed in time for that edition. My understanding is that the ink tests are part of a series of tests all being done at once, including carbon 14 dating of the papyrus, although I have not interviewed those conducting the tests. I have been really busy with other stories so haven’t had time to check but will try! Thanks for your note. L

        Mike Grondin
      • Tom Hickcox
        My degree is in chemistry and I worked as an analytical chemist in industry as well as a lab supervisor. I have seen nothing online about what procedures are
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 5, 2012
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          My degree is in chemistry and I worked as an analytical chemist in industry as well as a lab supervisor.

          I have seen nothing online about what procedures are going to be used.  I would WAG that the analyses are not the sort any lab can do, and I would surmise expertise in this sort of thing is very limited.  The lab or labs probably have a backlog and moving the tests to the front of the line isn't the sort of thing that is done w/o paying a lot or having a lot of clout.  For one thing, you aggravate clients who are ahead of you in line, and, while this issue is important to many of us, it doesn't rank very high in the general scheme of things.

          So, there are a lot of factors that might not be obvious to those here.

          Put away your conspiracy theories.

          Tom Hickcox
          Danville, Ky.

          On 12/5/2012 13:49, Mike Grondin wrote:
          Hi Stephen,
           
          What I find mysterious is that there's been no mention of the ink
          test lately. It was originally scheduled for (mid? end?) October, as
          I understand it. In the Nov 11th Boston Globe article that Tom
          Hickcox noted onlist, Karen King was quoted as saying that she
          was waiting for its results, but here we are 3-4 weeks later, and
          the recent AP article from Harvard Divinity School doesn't even
          mention it. Was it folded into the larger set of authenticity tests?
          Lisa Wangsness, the author of the Boston Globe piece, suggests
          so in her response (nothing confidential in it) to a note I sent her
          today, but it hasn't been confirmed:

          Hi Mike, My understanding is that the testing would begin mid-October but could take a couple of months and may not be ready in time for the Jan. issue of the HTR – and indeed the AP had something yesterday saying that the tests would not be completed in time for that edition. My understanding is that the ink tests are part of a series of tests all being done at once, including carbon 14 dating of the papyrus, although I have not interviewed those conducting the tests. I have been really busy with other stories so haven’t had time to check but will try! Thanks for your note. L

          Mike Grondin




        • Andrew Bernhard
          Tom- I greatly appreciate the perspective on laboratories that you are able to offer here. You offer a plausible enough explanation. However, I think that
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 6, 2012
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            Tom-

             

            I greatly appreciate the perspective on laboratories that you are able to offer here. You offer a plausible enough explanation.

             

            However, I think that reason that people are growing concerned is that the more time goes by, the less we seem to hear about the tests. If there is a simple explanation like the one you propose, I just wish someone at Harvard would simply share it with a reporter following up on the story so we could get some kind of progress report.

             

            Best,

            Andrew

             

            From: gthomas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gthomas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom Hickcox
            Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 3:42 PM
            To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [GTh] on HTR delay in publishing "GJW"

             

             


            My degree is in chemistry and I worked as an analytical chemist in industry as well as a lab supervisor.

            I have seen nothing online about what procedures are going to be used.  I would WAG that the analyses are not the sort any lab can do, and I would surmise expertise in this sort of thing is very limited.  The lab or labs probably have a backlog and moving the tests to the front of the line isn't the sort of thing that is done w/o paying a lot or having a lot of clout.  For one thing, you aggravate clients who are ahead of you in line, and, while this issue is important to many of us, it doesn't rank very high in the general scheme of things.

            So, there are a lot of factors that might not be obvious to those here.

            Put away your conspiracy theories.

            Tom Hickcox
            Danville, Ky.

            On 12/5/2012 13:49, Mike Grondin wrote:

            Hi Stephen,

             

            What I find mysterious is that there's been no mention of the ink

            test lately. It was originally scheduled for (mid? end?) October, as

            I understand it. In the Nov 11th Boston Globe article that Tom

            Hickcox noted onlist, Karen King was quoted as saying that she

            was waiting for its results, but here we are 3-4 weeks later, and

            the recent AP article from Harvard Divinity School doesn't even

            mention it. Was it folded into the larger set of authenticity tests?

            Lisa Wangsness, the author of the Boston Globe piece, suggests

            so in her response (nothing confidential in it) to a note I sent her

            today, but it hasn't been confirmed:

            Hi Mike, My understanding is that the testing would begin mid-October but could take a couple of months and may not be ready in time for the Jan. issue of the HTR – and indeed the AP had something yesterday saying that the tests would not be completed in time for that edition. My understanding is that the ink tests are part of a series of tests all being done at once, including carbon 14 dating of the papyrus, although I have not interviewed those conducting the tests. I have been really busy with other stories so haven’t had time to check but will try! Thanks for your note. L

            Mike Grondin

             



          • Tom Hickcox
            Thanks, Andrew. I agree they could be more transparent about the process. They likely have a promised by date and could share that. Tom
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 6, 2012
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              Thanks, Andrew.

              I agree they could be more transparent about the process.  They likely have a promised by date and could share that.

              Tom

              On 12/6/2012 19:53, Andrew Bernhard wrote:

              Tom-

               

              I greatly appreciate the perspective on laboratories that you are able to offer here. You offer a plausible enough explanation.

               

              However, I think that reason that people are growing concerned is that the more time goes by, the less we seem to hear about the tests. If there is a simple explanation like the one you propose, I just wish someone at Harvard would simply share it with a reporter following up on the story so we could get some kind of progress report.

               

              Best,

              Andrew

               

              From: gthomas@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gthomas@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tom Hickcox
              Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2012 3:42 PM
              To: gthomas@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [GTh] on HTR delay in publishing "GJW"

               

               


              My degree is in chemistry and I worked as an analytical chemist in industry as well as a lab supervisor.

              I have seen nothing online about what procedures are going to be used.  I would WAG that the analyses are not the sort any lab can do, and I would surmise expertise in this sort of thing is very limited.  The lab or labs probably have a backlog and moving the tests to the front of the line isn't the sort of thing that is done w/o paying a lot or having a lot of clout.  For one thing, you aggravate clients who are ahead of you in line, and, while this issue is important to many of us, it doesn't rank very high in the general scheme of things.

              So, there are a lot of factors that might not be obvious to those here.

              Put away your conspiracy theories.

              Tom Hickcox
              Danville, Ky.

              On 12/5/2012 13:49, Mike Grondin wrote:

              Hi Stephen,

               

              What I find mysterious is that there's been no mention of the ink

              test lately. It was originally scheduled for (mid? end?) October, as

              I understand it. In the Nov 11th Boston Globe article that Tom

              Hickcox noted onlist, Karen King was quoted as saying that she

              was waiting for its results, but here we are 3-4 weeks later, and

              the recent AP article from Harvard Divinity School doesn't even

              mention it. Was it folded into the larger set of authenticity tests?

              Lisa Wangsness, the author of the Boston Globe piece, suggests

              so in her response (nothing confidential in it) to a note I sent her

              today, but it hasn't been confirmed:

              Hi Mike, My understanding is that the testing would begin mid-October but could take a couple of months and may not be ready in time for the Jan. issue of the HTR – and indeed the AP had something yesterday saying that the tests would not be completed in time for that edition. My understanding is that the ink tests are part of a series of tests all being done at once, including carbon 14 dating of the papyrus, although I have not interviewed those conducting the tests. I have been really busy with other stories so haven’t had time to check but will try! Thanks for your note. L

              Mike Grondin

               




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